Calcium Products - Displaying items by tag: supercals04
Calcium Product 98G

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Update from Iowa Soybean Association On-Farm Network on Sulfur

A few weeks ago, we had the pleasure of attending the Iowa Soybean Association’s On-Farm Network (OFN) conference in Ames. One of the highlights of the conference for me was the presentation by Dr. Tracy Blackmer about sulfur.

Sulfur application over the past 30 years was generally considered non-essential due to the high levels found in our atmosphere from power plant emissions high in sulfur, thereby satisfying plant needs. Times and emission standards have changed and, as a result, sulfur levels are much lower in atmosphere and soil than they were in 80s and 90s. Dr. Blackmer observed sulfur deficient corn in recent years and even dug out some old photos during his time at the University of Nebraska that showed sulfur deficiencies—at the time unnoticed, which was very surprising to him. Perhaps we have negated the benefits of sulfur application for far too long!

Gypsum (calcium sulfate) is a great source of sulfur and our gypsum product (SuperCal SO4) has been included in strip trials—on both corn and beans—within the OFN for the past few years. Some observations from aerial photography have shown strips that received gypsum are much darker green than those that didn’t. Looking further into the data, these same farms showed a corn yield increase from 0.5 to 8.8 bushel from sulfur application, as well as tissue testing that confirmed sulfur deficiency in the untreated strips. There is some thought that the sulfur being present in requisite amounts helps the plant use nitrogen more efficiently.

We look forward to further investigation of the benefits of sulfur application on corn in the upcoming season and beyond! Our thanks to all the cooperators within the OFN.

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Crop Nutrient Deficiency App

Hard to believe its been almost 2 years since we first did a blog on Smart phones apps for farmers.

We have another addition:

The Crop Nutrient Deficiency Photo Library for iPhone and iPad by IPNI.

This app is a comprehensive collection of crop nutrient deficiency photos. A range of nutrient deficiency examples are provided for 14 prominent crops. Text and diagrammatic descriptions are also provided.

While we think this app is great and can help you diagnose a problem, we highly suggest soil testing and making sure you are fertilizing for the most deficient nutrients. Did you know that some nutrients can take up to two weeks before a visible deficiency occurs? It can take another two weeks to correct the deficiency. That whole time you are losing yield you can never recover.

Even worse you can have nutrient deficiency that are not severe enough to show visual signs. Give us a call or send us your soil test we can help you sort it out before yield robbing visual signs occur!

Do you have other apps not on this list you can't live without, let us know and we'll add them to the list!!

 

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More sulfur updates...

While reading the 2012 Annual Farm Progress Reports from Iowa State University's Northern Research Farm in Kanawha, IA, we discovered another trial investigating sulfur fertilization via gypsum on corn. The impetus for the study was the same as the Iowa Soybean Association's; sulfur deficiencies are becoming widespread in both corn and alfalfa in Iowa and many other midwestern states. The experiment was performed by Dr. John Sawyer and David Rueber of Iowa State University.

Four rates of sulfur (5, 10, 20, 40 lbs/A) were applied to two different soils—one with low organic matter and a slope, and one with higher OM and less slope—as was a non-treated control (no sulfur) to compare differences throughout 2011 and 2012. These rates were applied to corn in 2011 and soybeans in 2012. The 2011 plots were planted to corn after soybean in 2011 and planted to corn again in 2012 to test residual effects of sulfur application. In 2012, additional plots were planted to soybean from corn the previous year.

In June 2011, corn leaf greenness was visibly different among plots that had sulfur applied vs. those that did not, as well as having taller plants. By late June, there was still a height difference but the color differences were diminished. Despite visual differences, there was no difference in yield between the treated and non-treated pltos.

This is where it gets interesting...

In 2012, the plots that had received sulfur in 2011 showed no visible differences from those that did not, unlike the differences in 2011. However, when harvest time came, there was an increase in corn yield for sulfur treated plots as a whole when averaged and compared against the non-treated control plots. So, there's something happening with the sulfur in the soil from year to year that isn't being accounted for that has increased corn yield as a residual effect. This is similar to what we saw with the Iowa Soybean Association On-Farm Network trials over the last few years; residual activity from sulfur application making a yield difference a year after we thought it would.

Soybeans did not show any statistically different response to the sulfur application in 2012.

This study will continue in 2013 and we are excited to see the results.

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Check out our new SuperCal SO4 plant!

We are pleased to announce our new Fort Dodge plant is up and running and sending SuperCal SO4 all over the world. Take a peek below.

This will make it easier for dealers to get the product in so you can use it on your fields. We know you want SuperCal SO4 and we've been working constantly to make it more available. Now you'll be able to get the best calcium source for your crops — never settle for something less!

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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SuperCal SO4 with Zn and N on Corn

SuperCal SO4 has been shown to increase nitrogen uptake as sulfur in SuperCal SO4 aids in the nitrification process. Calcium helps to stabilize nitrogen by decreasing volatilization loss. Calcium is essential to the biochemical process of plants to absorb nutrients. Adding SuperCal SO4 to your fertility program will make your expensive nitrogen and zinc work better.

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SuperCal SO4 on Soybeans with White Mold

Plot Map

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• Planted soybeans (Stine 2500) on May 16, 1998 at 50 lbs/A
• 20 acre field
• 5 Replications
• 2 Treatments

CaSO4 Soybean with White Mold Yield Map 1998

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The average of the areas receiving SuperCal SO4 yielded 48.4 bushels, the areas that did not get treated averaged 38.6 bushels, which was a difference of 9.8 bu/A. At $10 soybeans that is a return of over $65 per acre.

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SuperCal SO4 and Nitrogen Utilization on Corn

SuperCal SO4 was applied to a high pH 7.5 field with corn at Cedar Falls, Iowa in 2002. Four replications of six treatments were arranged in a randomized complete block design. This was an excellent year for corn and good yields were noted throughout the area. A moisture stress period was noted in midsummer, but timely rains contributed to good yields.

Yields increased from 207.6 bu/A for control to 221.8 bu/A with 300 lbs/A SuperCal SO4 applied at planting. A base rate of 140 lbs/A nitrogen (N) was applied as anhydrous ammonia to soybean ground, considering a rough credit 50 lbs. N/A for the contribution of soybeans in the rotation. However, the addition of 80 lbs N/A at sidedress time resulted in only a 2.1 bu/A yield increase over the 140 lbs N/A areas. One could speculate that the maximum nitrogen response rate had been reached with 140 + 50 + 80 = 270 lbs/A N with soybean credits. Yields did not increase with 300 lbs/A SuperCal SO4 plus 80 lbs N/A at sidedress time, and it is speculated the plants may have grown too much prior to the moisture stress period. Early application of SuperCal SO4 at planting may have contributed to promoting plant growth at the right time, and resulted in increased partitioning of photosynthates into the kernel.

Nitrogen-Utilization

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Copy of SuperCal SO4 Calculator Instructions

SuperCal SO4 Calculator Instructions

Calculator gives you the ability to compare the costs of SuperCal SO4 to other sulfur fertilizers. Follow these simple steps.

  • 1. Select your crop
  • 2. Input your yield goal
  • 3. Input your acres to be grown
  • 4. Select your alternate sulfur fertilizer
  • 5. Input the cost / lb for the alternate source
  • 6. Input the cost / lb for SuperCal SO4

 

 

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SuperCal SO4 Calculator Instructions

SuperCal SO4 Calculator Instructions

Calculator gives you the ability to compare the costs of SuperCal SO4 to other sulfur fertilizers. Follow these simple steps.

  • 1. Select your crop
  • 2. Input your yield goal
  • 3. Input your acres to be grown
  • 4. Select your alternate sulfur fertilizer
  • 5. Input the cost / lb for the alternate source
  • 6. Input the cost / lb for SuperCal SO4

 

 

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