Calcium Products - Displaying items by tag: science

Calcium Products - Displaying items by tag: science

Is your turf protected for the winter?

It’s not too late to winterize your turf and protect it from the harmful effects of the winter climate. If your turf is not properly prepared for the harsh winter climates it is going to struggle to re-establish this Spring when it comes out of dormancy.

Did you know that gypsum is the perfect winterizer. If you are not applying gypsum to your lawn before the first day of winter you are really placing undo harm to the turf. Gypsum creates a great enviroment for your turf to go into dormancy. It creates soil structure that allows space for the roots, increases the water holding capacity of the soil so the turf doesn’t go thirsty and it provides an area for maximum oxygen intake for the plant. While all these are great reason to apply gypsum to your turf, the most important reason to apply gypsum before the first day of winter is because of it amazing ability to provide protection against the copius amounts of salt and winter de-icers we apply to our sidewalks, driveways and parking lots. These are the products that not only keep us safe but “burn” the turf in the spring.

If the excess sodium levels are removed from the rootzone, your turf has an excellent chance of survival in the spring. When gypsum is applied the calcium in the gypsum preps the soil for the turf to survive and the sulfur bonds to the sodium  from the salts and de-icers products and flushes the sodium out of the root zone into the sub-soil where it cannot be harmful to the plant.

Give gypsum a try, your turf will thank you for it and your neighbors will wonder why your turf appearance is better than theirs in April and May.

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Anderson’s to close their Fairmont, IL facility

On December 13th the Anderson’s announced in a letter to their customers that they “elected to cease production of pelletized products at our Fairmount, Illinois facility.”

This is a big surprise since they closed the plant in spring of 2010 for repairs and upgrades. That closure caused wide spread shortage of pelletized lime and pelletized gypsum in the spring of 2010.

Many suppliers upon hearing such news would raise their prices 20-30%. Calcium Products will be keeping its current spring pricing in place. Though we strongly encourage all our dealers to contact their sales reps to plan out their spring needs. History has shown that when this plant is not operating there is a shortage of product in the market place. We are committed to ensuring our customers that prepay, that they will have good product supply for spring.

The one thing that we have going for us is we have some advanced warning of the shortage. We plan on running all plants at full capacity to try and meet the demand but storage is limited. We are working to find additional storage at satellite warehouses and with dealers. Those that can take product early are strongly encouraged to do so.

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A Guide to 16 Essential Plant Nutrients

There are 16 nutrients required to grow plants. Knowing these nutrients required to grow plants is only one aspect of successful plant development. Optimum production also requires knowing the rates of application, method and time of applications and the source of nutrients to use. Each of these nutrients is equally important to the plant, yet each is required in vastly different amounts. These differences have led to the grouping of these essential elements into 3 categories: primary (macro) nutrients, secondary nutrients and micronutrients. 3 of the Nutrients are taken up from either Air or Water; those are carbon (C), hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O). The remaining 13 nutrients are taken up from the soil.

PRIMARY NUTRIENTS

NITROGEN

  • Necessary for formation of amino acids, the building blocks of protein
  • Essential for plant cell division, vital for plant growth
  • Directly involved in photosynthesis
  • Aids in production and use of carbohydrates
  • Affects energy reactions in the plant

PHOSPHOROUS

  • Involved in photosynthesis, respiration, energy storage and transfer, cell division and enlargement
  • Promotes early root formation and growth
  • Improves quality of fruits, vegetables, and grains
  • Vital to seed formation
  • Helps plants survive the harsh winter conditions
  • Increases water-use efficiency
  • Hastens maturity

POTASSIUM

  • Carbohydrate metabolism and break down and translocation of starches
  • Increases photosynthesis
  • Increases water-use efficiency
  • Essential to protein synthesis
  • Important in fruit formation
  • Activates enzymes and controls their reaction rates
  • Improves quality of seeds and fruit
  • Improves winter hardiness
  • Increase disease resistance

SECONDARY NUTRIENTS

CALCIUM

  • Utilized for continuous cell division and formation
  • Involved in nitrogen metabolism
  • Reduces plant respiration
  • Aids translocation of photosynthesis from leaves of fruiting organs
  • Increases fruit set
  • Essential for nut development on peanuts
  • Stimulates microbial activity

MAGNESIUM

  • Key elements of chlorophyll production
  • Improves utilization and mobility of phosphorous
  • Activator and component of many plant enzymes
  • Directly related to grass tetany
  • Increases iron utilization in plants
  • Influences earliness and uniformity of maturity

SULPHUR

  • Integral part of amino acids
  • Helps develop enzymes and vitamins
  • Promotes nodule formation on legumes
  • Aids in seed production
  • Necessary in chlorophyll formation

MICRONUTRIENTS

BORON

  • Essential of germination of pollen grains and growth of pollen tubes
  • Essential for seeds and cell wall formation
  • Promotes maturity
  • Necessary for sugar translocation
  • Affects nitrogen and carbohydrate

CHLORINE

  • Not much information about its function
  • Interferes with P uptake
  • Enhances maturity of small grains on some soils

COPPER

  • Catalyzes several plant processes
  • Major function in photosynthesis
  • Major function in reproductive stages
  • Indirect role of chlorophyll production
  • Increases sugar content
  • Intensifies color
  • Improves flavor of fruits and vegetables

IRON

  • Promote formation of chlorophyll
  • Acts as an oxygen carrier
  • Reactions involving cell divisions and growth

MAGANESE

  • Functions as a part of certain enzyme systems
  • Aids in chlorophyll synthesis
  • Increases the availability of P and Ca

MOLYBDENUM

  • Required to form the enzyme “nitrate reductas” which reduces nitrates to ammonium in plant
  • Aids in the formation of legume nodules
  • Needed to convert inorganic phosphates to organic forms in the plants

ZINC

  • Aids in growth hormones and enzyme system
  • Necessary for chlorophyll production
  • Necessary for carbohydrate formation
  • Necessary for starch formation
  • Aids in seed formation
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Not just a Calcium Products company…

With my job and I am very fortunate to travel all across this great country of ours. I have an opportunity to meet people from all walks of life and introduce them to Calcium Products, Inc. Typically, I give them my 30 second elevator speech about who Calcium Products are and then depending on who I am talking with I will expand into a more detailed account of our company.

Most people can figure out what we do simply by looking at our company name, but we are so much more than that. While calcium certainly plays a huge role in our base ingredients for manufacturing we actually blend 9 of the 16 essential  plant nutrients in our base calcium products. You could make a very strong case however we blend  12 out of 16 if you include Carbon, Hydrogen and Oxygen.

If you are going to be growing anything, whether it is corn or beans to flowers and turf, all plant life needs to have some percentage of all 16 nutrients to survive. Three of the 16 essentials are provided from air and water; carbon (C), hydrogen (h) and oxygen (O), the remaining 13 are taken up from the soil; nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), sulphur (S), magnesium (Mg), boron (B), chlorine (Cl), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), zinc (Zn).

If 81% of the essential nutrients are taken up from the soil, wouldn’t a grower need to have the properly conditioned soil to grow in? Our answer at Calcium Products is yes!

You see, at Calcium Products we strive to create the most ideal soil environment to feed the world, inspire outdoor recreation and develop products that are vital to the stewardship of land and water resources.

Here is a look at our products and the nutrients we supply to the growers of the world:

SuperCal SO4–  21% calcium (Ca), 17% sulphur (S) {in our gypsum, we actually have 2 extra water molecules attached to the crystalline structure of the gypsum, therefore you can include hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) to the nutrient mix.}

SuperCal 98G–  36% calcium (Ca), <0.5% magnesium (Mg)

Triplicity  13% carbon (C), 37% calcium (Ca), 0.5% sulphur (S), 0.3% magnesium (Mg)

HumaCal–  18% calcium (Ca), 5% sulphur (S) {also contains 30% humate materials}

SuperCal 15K–  15% potassium (K2O), 1% calcium (Ca), 9% sulphur (S)

MicroHume–  5% calcium (Ca), 8% sulphur (S), 2% boron (B), 1% copper (Cu), 2% manganese (Mn), 3% zinc (Zn)

Sulphur Plus–  2% potassium (K2O), 1% calcium (Ca), 9% sulphur (S) 

Whether you’re a farmer or a gardener, a turf professional or a homeowner, you need products that can supply the nutrients that your plant needs to survive. So the next time you are looking for a full line of products, remember Calcium Products isn’t just a calcium company!

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GCSAA members – the unseen heroes of many a golf course!

Golf Course superintendents’ work is often seen, but they are rarely seen or their work realized. It is not an uncommon practice for the maintenance staff at a golf facility to be up working well before the sun comes up.

As a PGA member since 1999, I certainly appreciate the hard work and dedication it takes to be in the golf industry, but I know it takes even more hard work and dedication to be in charge of the grounds and maintenance. More times than not, GCSAA members and their colleagues do not get the accolades they deserve. I consider golf course superintendents the unsung heros of the golf industry.

Next time you see your golf course superintendent keep in mind, their jobs are often 24/7 shifts. It takes time, patience, flexibility, and supreme organization to manage 100 acres or more of managed turf, not to mention their staff and their families.

Yes, it is true; superintendents do mow grass, rake bunkers and pick up trash but consider this:

 

YOUR GCSAA MEMBER IS ALSO:

An ambassador for your facility

An environmental steward

A mentor to their staff

An agronomist for the facility

A communicator to the membership

Facility manager for the ground department

Human resources director for their area

OSHA director

Financial planner managing the facility’s largest portion of the budget

Material scheduler and planner

Landscape and golf course architect

A certified, licensed applicator

An artist

A mechanic

An irrigation technician

Meteorologist

Public speaker

An educator

A political activist

ALL IN A SINGLE DAY’S WORK!

The next time you head out the golf course, be sure to spend a couple of minutes getting to know the golf course superintendent and thank him for all the hard work and commitment they provide for your golfing enjoyment!

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Oceans, glaciers, volcanos & giants…A look @ Iowa’s past

One of the many reasons Calcium Products has premium products is the extremely high-quality, pure limestone and gypsum we use. I thought it’d be interesting to share some of Iowa’s history that made our lime and gypsum so amazing. It also contributes to the rich Iowa farmland we hear lots about. Check out this article from IPTV about the land history. Below is an excerpt:

Iowa has been under water in one form or another for much of its history. Ancient seas covered Iowa while it was located near the equator. For millions of years, the continental plate on which Iowa sits has slowly wandered around the globe. At one time the plate split apart, creating a rift. Then it moved back together. Several other times, it crashed into other plates. These crashes caused parts of the land to get pushed up out of the water. These earth-quaking events often formed mountains. The oldest mountain remnants in Iowa are found as Sioux Quartzite in the northwest corner of the state. 

When the land was above water, waves and rain worked to wear away the rocks. When plates crashed together again, the land often got pushed back down. While underwater, the land became covered with layers of sediment. Each layer of sediment holds clues to the past. Some layers have fossil crinoids, trilobites or even tree pollen. Most of these layers are buried under newer rocks and soil. But the bluffs that line the Mississippi River in northeast Iowa are an exposed outcrop of ancient sea sediments.

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