Calcium Products - Displaying items by tag: liming

Calcium Products - Displaying items by tag: liming

Still Time for Lime

So your dealer has told you that your local quarry has shut down and your dealer cannot get your lime applied.

Now what?!?

If you need lime, there is no substitute. The University of Wisconsin says that if you need lime you should see a 20%-40% increase in yields.

But my P and K numbers are low? If I can't get lime shouldn't I at least apply P & K.

No, if you pH is below 6.0, 25%-50% of N, P and K are unavailable to you crop. Only liming will make these nutrients available to your crop.

Applying fertilizer to soil that has low pH is like trying to bail out a boat before you fix the hole in it. Fertilizer is the main cause of acidity.

In test conducted by one of our customers, applying 600 lbs of SuperCal 98G to a soil pH of 5.1 increased the K by 23% and  P 8% in the soil. No other P or K was applied. The pH was increased to 5.7, while this is a big increase there is still work to be done on this field. Application of another 600-1000 lbs will bring this field into optimal range.

Don't let the quarry cost you money in lost yields and higher fertilizer bills. Apply SuperCal 98G up to planting to increase yields and make soil nutrients available to plants this year.

Every year you wait to apply lime could cost you $200 or more per acre in lost opportunity. Ask your dealer to apply SuperCal 98G today or find one that will on our dealer locator.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Liming, The Best Value in 2008

If you have acidic soils there is no better time to lime than this year. With phosphates and potash at all time highs, lime is comparatively cheap. Not to mention that where lime is needed you can expect a 10%-40% yield increase, according to the University of Wisconsin. Few crop inputs can boast this type of response.

With commodity prices sliding, farmers have been questioning every input. One that we deal with is, isn't ag lime cheaper and lasts longer than SuperCal 98G?

In many cases for equivalent rates of SuperCal 98G is actually cheaper than ag lime. This is because since 100% of 98G works in the field, you have to haul less to the field. Most ag lime is only 50% effective, but you'll pay the truck freight for the whole ton. Since SuperCal 98G is pelleted it can be spread with other fertilizers reducing application costs. Also you do not lose hundreds of pounds of 98G to drift like with ag lime.

What about longevity of lime? Isn't ag lime the best choice for a landowner? We don't think so, and here's why. The longevity of ag lime is due to how coarse it is. Since most ag lime averages 20-30 mesh, after 4 years is only 45% available. Or to put in another way you spend $40 per acre for 2 tons of lime and don't get a payback for 8 years.

Think of lime like phosphates, you could put 8 years of phosphate out and you technically wouldn't be wasting your money, it becomes available over a number of years. Is that really the most efficient way to apply phosphates? Not only do you tie up a tremendous amount of money, you could be throwing your soil out of balance and making some nutrients unavailable. This is exactly what happens when you only lime every 3-5 years.

There is a much more efficient way to lime, a way the returns money on your investment in the same year. In a test plot I had with a neighbor we applied 400# of SuperCal 98G after the corn was planted and received a 30-bushel gain. That's a return of $150 for $25 investment in the same year.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us! 

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Do you use facial tissue... or Kleenex?

Are you using pel-lime or SuperCal 98G?

What's the difference?

This article from Early To Rise does a good job explaining it.

It's Good to Know: Brand Names So Good, We Use Them All the Time

By Suzanne Richardson

Recently, Google has been up in arms because people are using ""google"" as a verb. That's all well and good when you're talking about using Google to google something. But when "google" applies to searching on any search engine, they get a little testy. And no wonder. It IS possible for a brand name to become so popular that it slips into the common vernacular... and loses all traces of its corporate identity in the process.

Do you use facial tissue... or Kleenex? And if you blow your nose with Puffs or Scott, do you still call it kleenex?

When you use the copy machine, are you photocopying or xeroxing?

Kleenex and Xerox aren't alone. Zipper, elevator, cellophane, thermos, and escalator are other examples of brand names turned generic.

This article appears courtesy of Early To Rise, the Internet’s most popular health, wealth, and success e-zine. For a complimentary subscription, visit http://www.earlytorise.com.


All "Pel-Lime" is not the same. Pel-lime is the generic term for pelletized limestone. Anyone can pelletize any quality of limestone. The pelletizing doesn't make it better.

SuperCal 98G has a higher purity and is ground finer than any other "pel-lime" in the country. This makes it much more effective than all others. When applying pelletized lime, ask for SuperCal 98G.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Rolaids for your soil

Many enjoyed a long weekend filled with friends, grilling and lots of food. Ever notice how the first bratwursts tastes way better than the fifth?

I might have over done it on brats, burgers, cookies, and ice cream this weekend!
By Monday afternoon the only thing that sounded good was a couple of Rolaids and a nap.

The same thing happens when you over feed your soil. You don’t get near the yield (enjoyment) from the last 50 pounds of nitrogen as the first 50. In fact adding too much nitrogen requires that you add lime to you soil. Liming your soil works like Rolaids in your belly. It reduces the acidity of the soil, so when you add more food (N), you enjoy higher yields.

With the costs of fertilizer inputs, now is the time to look at a program to lime fields that have proper fertility levels. By keeping you pH neutral you can increase plant available N, P, and K 25%-100% versus letting your soil get acid.

Avoid low available fertilizer, poor root growth, and low yields by keeping your pH neutral with SuperCal 98G

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Blossom-End Rot

We have received a number of phone calls recently on SuperCal SO4 and SuperCal 98G for tomatoes. SuperCal SO4 is the best product on the market to eleminate blossom-end rot. As always start with a proper soil analysis, then add fertilizers and amendments as need.

Blossom end rot:

Blossom-end rot is a nonparasitic disease of tomato, pepper and watermelon. Losses can vary from a trace to more than 50%.

Symptoms

The first symptom is a slight water-soaked area on or near the blossom end of the fruit. The affected area soon darkens and enlarges in a constantly widening circle until the fruit begins to ripen. The tissues are dark and shrunken and have a dry, leathery appearance. With pepper the rot is tan in color and should not be confused with sunscald, which is white. The affected area may be merely a speck or it may involve half or more of the fruit. Secondary microorganisms may grow on the decayed area.

Cause

Blossom end rot is caused by a lack of calcium in the developing fruit. This may be due to a lack of calcium uptake from the soil or to extreme fluctuations in water supply. Incidence of blossom-end rot is also increased where there is a low ratio of calcium to certain other nutrients such as potassium and nitrogen.

Control

Although the most desirable calcium levels for preventing blossom-end rot have not been determined, the application of lime (SuperCal 98G) to fields known to be low in calcium has helped to prevent the disease. Soil should be limed according to recommendations of soil analysis report, usually to pH 6.5-6.8. The use of gypsum (SuperCal SO4), at rates of 500 to 1000 pounds per acre (1 to 2 pounds per 100 square feet) can be be used at all soil pH's.

SuperCal 98G and SuperCal SO4 can be applied 2 weeks in advance of planting due to the fineness of the base material. Other lime and gypsum materials may need to be applied months in advance.

source: http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/pp/notes/oldnotes/vg19.htm

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Soil Biology - Azotobacter

We talk a lot about soil quality and soil biology. When we hear soil biology, earthworms and rhizobium are the first things that come to mind. There are many other soil life forms that deserve our attention. I will present information on the most beneficially ones over the next few months. As fertilizer prices continue to raise, it will be important to not only feed the crop, but also feed the organisms that enable the plant to access those high priced inputs.

I present Azotobacter

Azotobacter is a bacterium that can fix atmospheric nitrogen into the soil without the aid of a legume. It is a great source of nitrogen to meet the needs of crops, has the capability rejuvenate the soil, and provides nutrients for other microbiology to max out nitrogen fixation. Its main fuel is carbon (organic matter), but it also requires calcium, and micronutrients for nitrogen fixation.

Besides N fixation Azotobacter improves seed germination, produces plant growth promoting hormones, and fungicidal substances. Azotobacter is the heaviest breathing organism and requires a large amount of organic carbon for its growth. It thrives in alkaline soils and is less effective in soils with poor organic matter content, low pH and high salts.

Azotobacter produces Thiamin, Riboflavin, B12, B1, Biotin, Gibberellins, and Cytocinins. Azotobacter produces substances that are required for Rhizobium bacteria, and Mycorrhize growth. Rhizobium is primarily responsible for nitrogen fixation in legumes. Plants growing in the presence of Mycorrhize have improved nutrient and water uptake, disease resistance and superior growth.

Azotobacter also has a symbiotic relationship with Phosphobacteria. Phosphobacteria as it’s name implies transfers phosphate from insoluble soil particles directly to the plant in soluble from. Azotobacter and Phosphobacteria fix phosphate more efficiently together than alone. Phosphobacteria alone increased potato yields by 6%, while together with Azotobacter increased yields 33%.

Ensure that your not missing out on free nitrogen, keep your pH at 6.5 or higher, supply the necessary carbon and calcium that this extremely beneficial bacteria needs with SuperCal 98G pelletized lime.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!   

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Website Tools

"

We are constantly updating our website to bring you valuable information. Here is a short list of items you might find useful.

The State of Iowa Lime Report
Every quarter the Iowa Department of Agriculture samples lime quality of all liming products sold into the state of Iowa. Find out if the lime your using is any good or not.
 To get there, click on “Resources”, then “Links”, then “Lime Links”

Test Plot Results
We have been testing SuperCal SO4 and SuperCal 98G for over 10 years. See what others have found out, 98G raises pH, faster and more effectively than other products. Want to test our products on your farm? Contact you local agronomist or contact us here.
 To get there, click on “Resources”, then “Test Plot Results”

Customer Testimonials
Find out what other producers have discovered. SuperCal 98G and SO4 works on their farms. We have testimonials from farmers from North Dakota to Missouri. Have a great story how SuperCal 98G or SO4 increased production or decreased costs on your farm, let us know here.
 To get there, click on “Resources”, then “Customer Testimonials”

Event Calendar
Find out which farm shows and events we’ll be at. Click on the show name for all the details. We love talking with our customers and friends, and meeting new ones.
 To get there, click on “Resources”, then “Calendar”

We hope you find the information useful, thanks for reading.

"
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I might sail off the edge of the earth

The sun revolves around the earth

The world is flat

It takes 1.2 lbs of Nitrogen to make one bushel of corn

 

These are a just a few once held beliefs that come to mind. There are lots of them out there. Why do they persist and why does it take so long for people to let go of them. There is one main reasons; fear of loss.

Fear of loss can mean a number of things, fear of change, loss of yield, loss of a customer, loss of reputation.  There are still people who think the world is flat; they cannot accept change. If a crop consultant recommends a low N rate, and his client has poor yields, he will be blamed for the failure, even if N rate is not the reason. The fear of loss of that customer and being ridiculed keeps the status quos in place.

Western Union passed on the telephone, stating it is an unusable technology. They were so heavily invested in the telegraph system that they refused, or couldn’t see the benefits of the new technology. They had such domination on the communications industry that they could not believe that telephones could work.

What practices are you or your consults so heavily invested in that nothing else could work on your operations? Have you tried different N rates, applying sulfur, or cover crops? Yes, changing what your currently doing could cause some loss in the short term and may even take a little extra work. Don’t forget to consider what may be gained if your new practice works, lower fertilizer input costs, more income, more free time.

In 1899, then Patent Commissioner, Charles H. Duell reportedly announced, "everything that can be invented has been invented." We know that is not true and new and innovative inventions and ideas are developed every day

While liming is not new, the way we think about it is new. Would you expect good gains feeding cattle if you feed them 2 years of feed at once? Do you expect excellent return on investment by applying 5 years of phosphates at once? Applying SuperCal 98G pelletized lime reduce wild pH swings, is less expensive than ag lime, yields better, and makes all your other inputs work more efficiently.

Have a great Thanksgiving, and thanks for reading.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Buffer pH (BpH)

Soil pH measures the active acidity, while the buffer pH indicates the potential acidity. The amount of potential acidity for any given soil pH will depend upon the amount and type of clay and the level of organic matter in that soil. Therefore, it is possible to have two soils with the same soil pH but with different buffer pH's. A lower buffer pH represents a larger amount of potential acidity and thus more limestone is needed to increase the soil pH to a given level


Two buffer test that most labs use.

SMP Buffer Test (pHSMP)
This test measures the total soluble and exchangeable hydrogen and aluminum. It is reliable for soils with a greater than 1 Ton/acre lime requirement and it is also well adapted for acid soils with a pH below 5.8 containing less than 10% organic matter and having appreciable amounts of aluminum. If the soil pH is greater than 6.5, the SMP buffer test is not made, since lime is not needed for most crops.

Adams-Evans Buffer Test
This buffer method is primarily an adaptation of the SMP buffer, but it is specifically designed for low organic matter, sandy soils where amounts of lime are needed in small quantities and the possibility of over-liming exists. The chemistry of the Adams-Evans buffer solution works in the same manner as the SMP buffer solution. The pH of the Adams-Evans buffer solution is 8.0. When the buffer solution is added to an acid soil, the original pH of the buffer will be lowered. Since it is known how much acid is required to lower the buffer solution pH to any given level, the total acidity of the soil can be determined.

The buffer pH is the sample pH after the laboratory has added a liming material. The laboratory adds the buffering solution, which acts like an extremely fast-acting lime. Each soil sample receives the same amount of buffering solution; therefore the resulting pH is different for each sample.

To determine a lime recommendation, the laboratory looks at the difference between the original soil pH and the ending pH after the buffering solution has reacted with the soil. If the difference between the two pH measurements is large, it means that the soil pH is easily changed, and a low rate of lime will be sufficient. If the soil pH changes only a little after the buffering solution has reacted, it means that the soil pH is difficult to change and a larger lime addition is needed to reach the desired pH for the crop.

The reasons that a soil may require differing amounts of lime to change the soil pH relates to the soil CEC and the "reserve" acidity that is contained by the soil. Soil acidity is controlled by the amount of hydrogen (H+) and the aluminum (Al+++) that is either contained in, or generated by the soil and soil components. Soils with a high CEC have a greater capacity to contain or generate these sources of acidity. Therefore, at a given soil pH, a soil with a higher CEC (thus a lower buffered pH) will normally require more lime to reach a given target pH than a soil with a lower CEC.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Is Your Corn Suffocating?

In a past blog post on Silage I mentioned having poor OM (organic matter) can short your corn crop the number one nutrient needed for growth.

That nutrient is carbon, more specifically Carbon Dioxide. You may have noticed that CO2 has been getting a lot of press lately, but did you know; the atmosphere contains 400 ppm or 0.04% carbon dioxide, this present-day atmosphere concentration is just above "suffocation" level for green plants.

On a hot windless July day when your corn is in full tassel, it uses more CO2 than is available in the atmosphere. Where then can your crop get enough CO2 to continue respiration? It comes from having a quality soil that is high in OM and humus. As the OM breaks down, CO2 is released to be used by the plant for growth, making more OM in the form of increased plant growth and oxygen.

Here is a great article on CO2 from HighBrix Gardens, and why high quality soils are essential for increased yield.

Quick points;

An often-overlooked component in a plants ability to manufacture sugars is carbon dioxide (CO2).
The goal is to build up the carbon reserves in soil in the form of humus, so CO2 is released as gas during the growing phase of the new crop.
Iowa crop advisor Mike McNeil maintains that CO2 release and amount of nighttime buildup is a quality indicator of soils.
The greenhouse industry has known this for many years and regularly enhances the CO2 level in greenhouses to several thousand parts per million. The result: significant yield increase.
Older farmers will remember what happened when they cultivated young corn—it would grow six inches almost overnight after cultivation. Why, soil conductivity was increased and CO2 release was sped up. Combined these two factors caused tremendous crop growth.
Limestone is calcium carbonate, CaCO3. Not only does it provide calcium, it also provides carbon. Did you know that a 500 lb. application of high calcium limestone provides 190 lbs. of calcium and 60 lbs. of carbon?

Don't let high yields suffocate, applying SuperCal 98G pelletized lime, will help to build high quality soils, increase CO2 concentration in your fields, and increase yields.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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