Calcium Products - Displaying items by tag: limestone

Calcium Products - Displaying items by tag: limestone

Precision ag lime, seriously....

On Friday I was driving from Fort Dodge to Gilmore City, I thought there was a combine fire. Fortuneatly it was only a precision ag lime application, if there is such a thing. Friday was a relatively calm day, winds were less than 5 mph. You wouldn't expect much drift, but did you know that up to 1/4 of the lime you apply can drift off the field? Below are some of the pictures of a precision ag lime spread. 

 2 miles away I could get a picture of the ag lime cloud
This is precision application of ag lime
 When will the lime hit the ground? Better yet, where will it land?
 I wasn't aware ag lime applicators spread 120' patterns....
 Whoa, now they are speading a 480' swath! Talk about efficient!
 Since this is likely a grid sampled field, how to you control where the lime goes? Note the cool dust devil in the upper left corner, visable from the ag lime dust!
 Looks like most of the lime is landing on the next grid over, do you think this operator will still apply lime to that grid? How does he compensate for the drift?
 I have a feeling he doesn't like me photographing his work...
 
 No, I am sure he doesn't want me taking pictures!!
 There goes the product the farmer paid for!!
The lime drifts Read more...

I apply ag grade potassium...

How many farmers or dealers are applying a coarse ag grade, phosphorite, Kainite, or sylvinite

The answer is, almost none.

Why? Because highly efficient plant-available sources are available. While the cost of these products on a per ton basis is many times higher than the ore they are derived from, the per acre cost is lower due to the efficiencies gained through the processing and pelletizing or granulation of these materials. This makes the product less expensive and more effective on a per acre basis than shipping and applying many tons of a low grade ore.

Wouldn't it be great if there was someone who manufacted a highly efficient, very pure lime or gypsum product?

Lucky for the farmer there is. SuperCal 98G is the highest quality, highest efficiency liming material avaialble for agriculture. SuperCal SO4 is the country's most effective gypsum product.

Call us, we can show you how to increase yields while decreasing costs!

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, the blogronomist and VP of sales and marketing at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at blog.calciumproducts.com.

 

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Flood Related Lime Shortage?

Our thoughts are with those affected by the Missouri River flooding. Not just with the farmers that will be unable to harvest a crop this year, but also with the residents of the area. Most buildings in the flood area will have to be demolished after sitting in a flood waters for 3+ months.

The Missouri River Flood of 2011 will not have a significant impact on dealers & farmers along its boundaries, but those farther away as well. Impacts, real or potential could include:

  •                 Disruption of logistics-barge, rail & truck traffic
  •                 Infrastructure problems/closures-roads, bridges, rail lines
  •                 Manufacturing-production facilities, storage terminals not operational
  •                 Delays/changes in scheduling & shipments

Time will have the most severe impact on everything, in particular since the forecasts for the river suggest that current levels may be maintained well into August, & perhaps longer.  Many of the flood levees were not designed for 6-8 weeks of saturation, & may very well be unable to endure for that length of time.  

 

Fertilizer production & shipments are being affected.   Read more...

Pelletized lime, How quickly does it react?

 
Since not all pellet limes are the same we first need to talk about the properties of lime that is used. One of the most important characteristics of minerals is particle size. If you are like me, you slept through physics class and surface area to volume ratio may not mean much. However it is vitally important to how quickly lime reacts.
 
Surface area to volume ratio is a relatively simply property that is very important. It's why your wife can be cold while your sweating. Why road rock doesn't break down very fast, why sand leaches and clay doesn't let go of fertilizer.
 
Surface area to volume ratio is also important when choosing a fertilizer or soil amendment.  The surface-area-to-volume ratio is an important factor for the reactivity or the rate at which the chemical reaction will  take place. 
 
Materials with large surface area to volume ratios (e.g., very small diameter, like the base lime in SuperCal 98G) react at much faster rates than larger materials, because more particle surface is available to react. An example is grain dust; while grain is not typically flammable, grain dust is explosive. Another example is steel wool. Steel wool will burn, but take a nail and try and light it on fire. It take a lot of time and a lot of heat to get that nail to just melt.
 
Many people think that a ton of lime is a ton of lime. So why don't they just dump a 1 ton boulder in the field and call it limed? The finer the lime the more complete and quicker the reaction.
 
In an article by Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (published 30/03/2004) 'Reactivity is controlled by the electrons and electronic structure of the particles, which changes as the particle gets smaller,' Madden explains. In a smaller hunk of matter, more of the atoms are at the surface.'
 
In this test, we are showing how reactive a product is.
 
The rate at which the acid reacts with the limestone, dolomite of other calcareaous earth formation, is a function of acid concentration, temperature, velocity, the particular type of calcareous material or rock, and the rock surface area to volume ratio.
 
In other words, when you have small pure particles it just works better!
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ . 
 

 

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SuperCal 98G Better than the Next Big Thing

The next big thing is doing something with an old thing.

No limestone is not new. Knowledge of the value of lime in agriculture is ancient, but agricultural use only became widely possible when the use of coal made it cheap in the late 13th century.

Back in the day before high powered crushers lime was quarried through burning it. This quick lime was mainly used in mortar, but some did reach farm fields.

In the 1950’s when mechanization became main stream and we were in the height of road building, cheap crushed limestone became the norm. This is the product most still use today. The chips and dust from making aggregate for road stone and cement.

While we didn’t invent the use of limestone in agriculture we are improving on it. Our process takes some of the purest limestone on the planet, grinding it past 100 mesh, and then pelletizing* it for ease of handling. It is the purity and fineness of grind that makes it so effective.


Ag Leader didn’t make GPS, they made it more effective for farming

John Deere didn’t invent the plow, he made it better

Henry Ford didn’t develop the car, he helped get it to the masses

With apologies to Seth

*No pelletizing isn't new, its been around since the 70's. However everyone is pelletzing the course ground leftovers of crushing aggreget. This doesn't make it more effective, just more expensive!

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ Read more...

Wet soils require extra nutrients for high yields

How will all the excess moisture from this growing season affect your fertility plans?
 
Did you know that wet soils can cause deficnecies in nutrients other than Nitogens?
 
Here is some excerpts from an article written by Neil Kinsey 
...excess moisture has caused some fertilizer nutrients needed for good crop production to be leached out, washed downward out of the topsoil. This is especially true for nitrogen, sulfur and
boron, which is generally expected to be the case with highly active soil water systems. But often overlooked is the loss of calcium, which is another element that can be lost from higher rates of moisture.
 
But just applying some type of lime to correct the pH is not the best answer. In fact, some of the fields that have received high magnesium (dolomite) lime can still have an adequate pH and yet be limiting your crop yields.
 
When dolomite is applied in too large a quantity, it can cause an excess of magnesium and have a negative effect on yields. In corn, on medium to heavy soils, a high level of magnesium (above 15 percent) costs the farmer 10 bushels of corn per acre. Above 20 percent magnesium on the soil test reduces the yield by another 5 or more bushels per acre. In addition, it will require more nitrogen to produce each bushel of corn every year until the problem is corrected. In legumes, taking soybeans as an example, 13 to 14 percent magnesium levels can cause losses of 10 bushels per acre per year, even when all other nutrients are present in the proper amounts.
 
For more information on wet soils http://blog.calciumproducts.com/posts/how-floods-affect-soil.cfm
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .
 
 
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Change

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.  ~Author unknown

Life is about change. Change you socks, change your shoes, make change, change a tire, change the channel, a change in the weather, change seed varieties, change implements. Every day we change hundreds of things, many without thinking about it. Change is not a bad thing. Driving to work today in almost blizzard conditions I cannot wait for the weather to change.

If things didn’t change farming would not be possible. Farming needs change. The sky changes from night to day, the soil changes from black to rows of green. If things didn’t change you could not grow a crop. If you don’t change the way you farm from year to year, how do you expect to stay profitable?

What about your input supplier? Have they recommend changes to keep you profitable? What about you supplier that has not been able to get ag lime spread for the past 3 years because the weather has changed? Many climatologist are predicting that winters will be much more severe than the past 10 years. If they have not been able to spread the past three, are the next 10 going to be any better?

SuperCal 98G is a big change for farmers and agronomists. I understand that it is difficult understand how applying less lime gets better results. This is a huge change in thinking. Over ten years SuperCal 98G has shown to increase soil pH and yields. We would love to Prove It to you. Contact one of our sales representatives to find out how you can conduct an on farm trial.

Greg Ervin, MN, WI, ND, SD, North East IA, Canada
Glen Howell, NE, South and East IA, IL, MO, KS
Craig Dick, all other areas

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How does your lime measure up?

Ever wonder just how good the lime is from your local quarry? The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, Commercial Feed and Fertilizer Bureau checks all the quarries that sell lime into Iowa. It has released a new Ag Limestone Quarry Certification Report. It can be accessed on their site by clicking on the hyperlink above. 

The Fertilizer bureau does not check every quarry every quarter so you may have to check some old reports to find your quarry.

If your soil test calls for 2 tons of 90% ECCE ag lime, and your local quarry only has 45% ag lime then you will need to apply 4 tons to meet the requirements of your soil test. This is why many farmers complain that they applied ag lime and saw no results, they didn't apply enough to do any good. More importantly they applied too much product that will never do any good for them, wasting valuable input dollars.

Much of the limestone in Iowa either has too much inert ingredients (clay, sand, marl, etc.) or is not crushed fine enough to get results in your life time. Make sure your money is working for you and not buying garbage.

SuperCal 98G is crushed to minus 100 mesh, meaning it's finer than ag lime and pelletized to reach the field where it goes to work making you money instantly. The purity and fineness combine to make it 5 times more effective than 1 ton of ag lime.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Liming, The Best Value in 2008

If you have acidic soils there is no better time to lime than this year. With phosphates and potash at all time highs, lime is comparatively cheap. Not to mention that where lime is needed you can expect a 10%-40% yield increase, according to the University of Wisconsin. Few crop inputs can boast this type of response.

With commodity prices sliding, farmers have been questioning every input. One that we deal with is, isn't ag lime cheaper and lasts longer than SuperCal 98G?

In many cases for equivalent rates of SuperCal 98G is actually cheaper than ag lime. This is because since 100% of 98G works in the field, you have to haul less to the field. Most ag lime is only 50% effective, but you'll pay the truck freight for the whole ton. Since SuperCal 98G is pelleted it can be spread with other fertilizers reducing application costs. Also you do not lose hundreds of pounds of 98G to drift like with ag lime.

What about longevity of lime? Isn't ag lime the best choice for a landowner? We don't think so, and here's why. The longevity of ag lime is due to how coarse it is. Since most ag lime averages 20-30 mesh, after 4 years is only 45% available. Or to put in another way you spend $40 per acre for 2 tons of lime and don't get a payback for 8 years.

Think of lime like phosphates, you could put 8 years of phosphate out and you technically wouldn't be wasting your money, it becomes available over a number of years. Is that really the most efficient way to apply phosphates? Not only do you tie up a tremendous amount of money, you could be throwing your soil out of balance and making some nutrients unavailable. This is exactly what happens when you only lime every 3-5 years.

There is a much more efficient way to lime, a way the returns money on your investment in the same year. In a test plot I had with a neighbor we applied 400# of SuperCal 98G after the corn was planted and received a 30-bushel gain. That's a return of $150 for $25 investment in the same year.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us! 

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