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Corn roots growing video

A lot of corn has been planted and it is now rooting down. Have you ever wondered what that looks like? The Gilroy lab funded by the NSF & NASA studies how plants sense and respond to stress, and how roots grow. The had this video linked to their website.    As the root pushes down it develops root hairs to increase its surface area so it increases its nutrient and water absorbing capacity.     The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!
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Windbreaks Increase Yields

If you want great soil quality, you have to make sure the soil stays in your field. While wind erosion has declined in the last 20 years, recent land values, adoption of no-till, larger farm equipment, and aging windbreak plantings have led to the removal of windbreak. It may surprise many growers that windbreaks offer an overall yield increase. A worldwide study found that within the protected zone of the windbreak, spring wheat yields increased an average of 8%, corn by 12%, soybeans by 13%, and winter wheat by 23%. You can learn more by reading the article A Break for Higher Yields found in the Furrow.     The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more.…
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What is soil quality?

We have always talked about the importance of soil quality. Improving soil quality is the number one thing you can do to improve yields on your farm. What is it that we are talking about when we say "Soil Quality"? At soilquality.org they have a couple of definitions. "Fitness for use" (Larson and Pierce, 1991) and "the capacity of a soil to function” (Karlen et al., 1997). Taken together, these two definitions means that soil quality is the ability of the soil to perform the functions necessary for its intended use. and Probably the most comprehensive definition of soil quality to date was published by the Soil Science Society of America's Ad Hoc Committee on Soil Quality (S-581) as "the capacity of a specific kind of soil to function, within natural or managed ecosystem boundaries, to sustain plant and animal productivity, maintain or enhance water and air quality, and support…
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Better Roots for Better Soil

Could better corn roots be the key to better quality soil and water? According to the article “How Corn Roots Got Better by Accident, traditional plant breeding has also made roots better at taking up nitrogen, though more research is need to understand the mechanisms. Here are some key points from the article: Image: Courtesy of Larry York Using a Penn State-developed computer program called SimRoot, researchers modeled the average root architecture of modern corn hybrids (shown) to help compare it to that of older varieties. “About half of the yield gains in commercial corn hybrids in the last 100 years have come from improved plant genetics, explains Larry York, recent PhD graduate in ecology, now a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Nottingham. The other half came largely from agronomic practices, such as fertilizer use and higher planting densities.” “A lot of research has focused on the shoots…
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Maintained by Craig Dick, blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing, we have a wide array of blog articles from Craig and some expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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