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Calcium Product 98G

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Rescuing Sulfur Deficiency with Topdress Application of SO4

Photo above: 2016 sulfur trial on corn in Kanawha, Iowa at the ISU Northern Research Farm. SO4 applied at 150 lbs/acre (left) and no sulfur applied (right). SO4 application resulted in a 30 bu/acre increase compared to no sulfur. Expect Sulfur Deficiency With seemingly endless rainfall this spring, we can expect widespread sulfur deficiency as corn continues to emerge. The problem is that sulfate is easily leached from where the young corn roots need it in wet years. Sulfur deficiency shows up in the youngest leaves of the plant, and consists of green and yellow stripes in the leaves. Many confuse nitrogen deficiency with sulfur deficiency, and the most likely scenario is that it’s sulfur and not nitrogen since most growers typically put out more than enough nitrogen to meet crop needs. To compound this problem, wet springs often mean that sulfur applications were skipped or postponed in lieu of…
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Soil Testing Helps Inform Application Decisions

Why soil test? Soil testing is an important part of our philosophy at Calcium Products – without knowing the nutrient status of your soil, how are you to make informed decisions about what to apply to it? Turf managers are normally good about soil testing, but if you haven’t been consistent about it or have been thinking about starting a soil testing program, now is the time to do so. With environmental regulations being administered in certain areas of the U.S., soil testing will help you maximize your fertilizer investment and make educated decisions on the best type of fertilizers to supply exactly what you need. What a soil test measures There are a wide variety of soil tests available that can help you gain insight into your nutrient status, soil type/texture, infiltration rates, water holding capacity, etc. A basic soil test is likely to provide you with the following…
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Soybean Nodules Adversely Affected by Low Soil pH

Soybean nodules supply plant available nitrogen Nodules on soybean roots are formed by a specific genus of soil-borne bacteria, Rhizobium, which form a symbiotic relationship with the plant. The nodules fix nitrogen from the atmosphere and transform it into plant available nitrogen, while the plant supplies necessary nutrients and energy for the bacteria to multiply and thrive. Typically, nitrogen fixation via nodules supplies most of the nitrogen that a soybean crop needs during a given year and additional nitrogen applications are not advised as that can have a detrimental effect on nodules. If there is nitrogen available from applied fertilizer, the relationship between the nodules and the plants suffer, ultimately hindering the ability of the nodules to fix nitrogen. It’s a costly move for both growers and the plant-bacteria interaction. Nodules hindered by low soil pH Nodule formation and performance is hindered by soil pH below 5.7. Many fields in…
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How to repair sodic soils

Sodium problems are becoming more widespread Sodic soils are one of the most difficult challenges facing turf managers in areas where they exist. With the rise of effluent water use for golf course and athletic field irrigation, sodium problems are becoming more widespread than they were in the past. High levels of sodium create a toxic environment for plant health and destroy the physical structure of soils. Sodium becomes a problem when it reaches levels that overwhelm the natural equilibrium of the soil. It causes soil clay particles to swell and disperse, causing soil pores to become blocked, limiting water infiltration and drainage of the soil. Plants trying to grow in sodic soils exhibit symptoms of drought due to excessive uptake of sodium and lack of water infiltration into the soil where roots normally grow. Check out our document on using SO4 and 98G to manage sodium affected soils. Del…
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Can 98G and SO4 be Applied on Frozen Ground?

We are often asked about applying our products on snow-covered or frozen ground. While it may seem intuitive that products should not be applied to frozen ground, in general, applications can be made during late fall or winter and have similar considerations as other times of the year, such as water and ground conditions. When determining if conditions are adequate to apply SO4 and 98G, keep these considerations in mind. Potential for water runoff Water influences movement of surface applied inputs. When water has potential to runoff and not infiltrate, then perhaps applications should be delayed. Late fall and early winter before the ground is completely frozen can be a good time to make applications. As long as there’s not a substantial amount of snow on the ground (less than 6 inches), applications of 98G and SO4 can still be made. If snow comes early, there’s potential that it will…
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