Calcium Products - Glen Howell
Calcium Product 98G

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Glen Howell

Glen Howell

Calcium, Honeybees, Memory

Long-term memory formation in honeybees is instigated by a calcium ion cascade. Researchers have shown that calcium acts as a switch between short- and long-term storage of learned information.

Jean-Christophe Sandoz led a team of researchers from the CNRS, the Université de Toulouse and the French Calcium Research Network, who carried out the neurological honeybee experiments. Sandoz and his colleagues studied a learned behaviour in the bees, extension of the proboscis in response to olfactory stimuli associated with food. Three days after decreasing calcium levels during learning, the bees stopped responding to the odor, and three days after increasing calcium during learning, bees' response to the odor were stronger. In addition, the researchers found that the increased memory performance in bees induced by increased calcium depended on protein synthesis. According to Sandoz, "We have found here that the modulation of calcium during learning affects long-term memory specifically while leaving learning and short-term memory intact".

Link: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/7/30/abstract

I (Glen) wonder if this applies to our memory also?

 

 

 The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Fertilizer & Cattle

Have you ever had cattle consume fertilizer?  It can happen, and depending on the product, can be a significant problem.  If it contains nitrate (ammonium nitrate or potassium nitrate), it can lead to nitrate poisoning.  Nitrate itself is not poisonous, but it is converted to nitrite in the digestive system.  According to Charlie Stoltenow, North Dakota State University Extension Service veterinarian, nitrite is 10x more toxic than nitrate. 

Nitrite is absorbed into the red blood cells and combines with hemoglobin to form methemoglobin. Methemoglobin cannot transport oxygen as effectively as hemoglobin, so the animal’s heart rate and respiration increase. The blood and tissues of the animal take on a blue to chocolate brown tinge, muscle tremors can develop, staggering occurs and the animal eventually suffocates.

“Fertilizer is good for plants, but not good for cattle,” Stoltenow says. 

I wonder what he thinks about using urea or urea-based feeds as a protein source in finishing cattle?

According to the article, the best way of preventing fertilizer-related nitrate poisoning in cattle is by controlling access to fertilizer. Avoid letting cattle graze immediately after spreading fertilizer and clean up fertilizer spills. Areas where the fertilizer spreader turns or areas where filling (and consequently spilling) take place may have excessive quantities of nitrate available to the cattle. Also, do not allow cattle to have access to areas where fertilizers are stored.

You can read more here:

http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/news/newsreleases/2009/june-8-2009/fertilizer-and-cattle-do-not-mix/

SuperCal 98G & SuperCal SO4 are produced from products that are commonly found in nature (calcium carbonate & calcium sulfate, respectively).  They are not toxic to humans or animals. 

 

 

 The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

 

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Creating healthier lettuce

The darker color in leafy vegetables are associated with antixoxidants, which are thoughts to have many health benefits.  A team of plant physiologists at the USDA facility in Beltsville, MD has used ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to make lettuce darker and redder, i.e. healthier.

This may allow for the opportunity to improve the quality of food grown in greenhouses, especially during the winter.  It may also be used to maintain the quality of food already in storage.

Link: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090518172659.htm

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Could soil help us in fighting infection?

Could soil help us in fighting infection?

Historical anecdotes of the red soils from the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan tell of people using the soils to treat skin infections and diaper rash. A multinational group of researchers suggest the healing power may be due to antibiotic-producing bacteria they have found living in the soil. This discovery may ultimately lead to new antibiotic treatments against harmful pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. The researchers report their findings in the May 2008 issue of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Link: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090518222202.htm

A reasons why soil quality, while hard to measure, is of huge importance.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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