Calcium Products - Displaying items by tag: turf and ornamentals
Calcium Product 98G

title-blogronomist

Localized Dry Spot

Localized Dry Spot

What is localized dry spot?

With an unusually hot start to the late spring/summer season, localized dry spot (LDS) is showing up earlier and more vigorously than normal. LDS shows up as somewhat randomized, dry looking areas of turf. It is generally seen on sand-based greens, but can occur on other turfs that have been heavily topdressed with sand over the years. Sand-based soil has greater propensity for hydrophobic conditions, which is the main sign of LDS.

What causes localized dry spot?
The deeper cause, beyond sand-based soils, are believed to be organic acids and residue that coat the soil or sand particles. These organic compounds are not completely understood, but are the result of typical decomposition of leaf tissue, roots, fungal biomass and organic soil amendments included in the original root zone mix. These compounds tend to have a hydrophobic nature and once they have coated soil particles, lead to LDS. Combine this hydrophobicity with root growth stoppage in heat and soils that already have low moisture holding capacity, and the problem can become bad in a hurry.

How to manage localized dry spot
While there is plentiful research into the causes and potential areas that could be managed differently to delay or correct LDS, the primary management technique has been and continues to be the use of wetting agents or surfactants to allow water to re-infiltrate areas that develop hydrophobicity.

There are several different chemical groups in the wetting agent and surfactant world, but the goal of all of these products is to lower the surface tension of water so it can infiltrate the hydrophobic soil. It pays to do your homework on the types of products available in the market to determine which one will provide you with the best result. Some of the older chemistries can cause phytotoxic effects on plants, so make sure you fully understand what you’ve got before spraying it on your greens.

Be prepared
Unfortunately, there doesn’t exist today a ‘silver bullet’ to cure LDS. The best strategy is to incorporate existing knowledge into new construction and for existing problems, to know when it’s coming and be prepared with a wetting agent or surfactant strategy to minimize the damage and interruption in play. Be sure to know what your local extension has to say about LDS management in your specific area.

Read more...

Gypsum is gypsum . . . right? Wrong.

 

Gypsum is gypsum…right? Wrong.

Gypsum is just gypsum and any will do, right? Wrong! Just like any product in the marketplace, there are high quality and low quality gypsum's and the adage of you get what you pay for is absolutely true.

Gypsum is a very misunderstood amendment; most people don’t understand the value. Before I talk about how the quality of gypsum can affect its effectiveness, let me give you a general overview of the material.

Gypsum comes in two different forms, both of which can be used in the turf industry. The first is calcium sulfate anhydrite and the second is calcium sulfate dihydrate. As you can read, both forms have both calcium and sulfur as part of the elemental make-up. The difference between the two, however, is directly tied to its effectiveness and that difference is water! The second form, calcium sulfate dehydrate, has 2 additional water molecules associated with the calcium sulfate crystal. It is these additional water molecules that make the elements of calcium and sulfur available to the plant within hours, opposed to days or weeks with the anhydrite form. For additional detailed information on the difference between the two forms, check out this video by Pace Turf.

Hopefully after watching the video you now understand that the ONLY gypsum you should use is the dihydrate form; now it is up to you to find the best form available.
By law, all gypsum bags must have a product analysis printed someplace on the bag. It will look something like this:

Guaranteed Analysis:
Ca (calcium)……………………………………………..#%
S (sulfur)…………………………………………………#%
CaSO4-2H2O (calcium sulfate dihydrate)……#%
Derived from: calcium sulfate dihydrate

The most important line in the analysis is:
CaSO4-2H2O (calcium sulfate dihydrate)……#%.

This is the line that will show you the purity or the quality of the material. The closer that percentage is to 100%, the more effective and efficient the gypsum is for your particular application. As that percentage gets further away from 100% the more material you will need to apply to maximize the nutritional value of the gypsum.

Another major factor in your selection of gypsum had to do with the fineness of the particle that makes up the gypsum in the bag. So what does fineness mean? Fineness has to do with how small the raw material is crushed to and how much can pass through a mesh screen before it is bagged or pelletized then bagged.

Side note: there are various mesh screen sizes. For example, if the screen size is 10 mesh, that means there are 10 holes for every square inch. If the screen size is 200 mesh, it means there are 200 holes for every square inch. Remember, the higher the mesh size the smaller the particle has to be to pass through.

I added the side note is because particle size is directly related to the efficiency of gypsum. The smaller the gypsum becomes the more surface area it will cover. This is important because if you can cover more surface area with less product, you are maximizing the value of the application. The fineness can be found on the bag alongside the analysis.

There are a lot of options in the marketplace for gypsum and to the less educated user, it’s all the same. Now you know why that isn't true. Turn over the bag now that you know what to look for. Check the analysis and mesh factor to make an educated decision. Trust me, your soil will thank you for it and, hopefully, you’ll thank me too!

 

Read more...

Growing golf – hope springs eternal

Depending on whom you ask, the official arrival of spring begins either on March 1 (meteorological spring), March 21 (astronomical spring) or Monday to kick off the start of Masters week (golfers’ spring).

There is no tradition like the Masters Golf Tournament and if you are in the golf business you know what I mean. The membership at Augusta National Golf Club hosts the greatest event in all of sport, in my humble opinion. They do some unique things such as referring to ticket holders as “patrons,” price the concessions so inexpensive that the first time you visit The Masters as a patron you have to ask are you sure the price is right? A classic Coke cost $1.50 and a pimento cheese or ham sandwich costs only $1.50. Parking is FREE, and the grounds are manicured to perfection, leaving no stone unturned, no blade of grass out of place. It is a very spiritual place.

During yesterday’s Chairman’s Press Conference, Billy Payne, Masters Chairman, was asked about a rule in golf. He simply deferred answering the question by stating Augusta National is just a golf club that happens to host a well-known tournament, it wouldn’t be prudent to make golf policy decisions. In their own way, in an unassuming way, Augusta National and their leadership knows they are more than “just a golf club hosting a well-known tournament.” They are the most powerful golf body in the world. What Augusta National does, it is likely others will follow.

One of the tenets of the PGA of America is to grow the game of golf. As a PGA member for over 10 years I can tell you growing the game is the future of golf. While we, as PGA professionals, have always had strong initiatives to grow the game, the PGA of America, in my opinion, has fallen short.

What Payne announced Monday and re-iterated yesterday in his Chairman’s press conference was that if Augusta National wants to grow the game of golf and do it in an exciting way, they can do it. It was announced in partnership with the USGA and the PGA of America, Augusta National created a competition for junior golfers to introduce and inspire a new generation of golfers. The competition is the National Championship of the Drive, Pitch and Putt competition with the finals at Augusta National Golf Club on the Sunday before tournament week.

There have been a lot of growing the game initiatives, and they have been pretty successful, but if I know Augusta National like I think I do, this new competition is going to inspire, introduce and invigorate a new generation of golfers. Well done, Chairman Payne, well done!

Read more...

Brian Milam, Territory Sales Manager | Turf, Eastern U.S.

Brian joined the Calcium Products team in 2009 charged with growing the company’s professional turf business. Prior to starting with Calcium Products, Brian was a golf professional for the first 11 years of his career. Most recently, he worked for two years as a store manager and director of instruction at GolfTEC. The first nine years of his career was with Kohler Company working as a golf professional at Blackwolf Run and Whistling Straits in Wisconsin. While with Kohler, Brian contributed to the successful execution of the 1998 U.S. Women’s Open, the 2001 PGA Club Professional Championship and the 2004 PGA Championship. Brian graduated with two bachelor’s degrees, professional golf management and marketing, from Mississippi State University in 1998.

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed
Blogronomist

ABOUT OUR BLOGRONOMIST PAGE

Maintained by our team of experts, we have a wide array of blog articles from our experts and guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

  1. Categories
  2. Archives

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007