Calcium Products - Displaying items by tag: pelletized lime
Calcium Product 98G

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Take the 98G Challenge – See How Your Aglime Stacks Up.

Challenge Blog Image

Do you know how effective your aglime is in changing soil pH?

Below are two photos comparing 98G, our pelletized lime product, to aglime being spread in a field near Boxholm, Iowa. The photos illustrate that the finest particles in aglime, although the most effective at changing soil pH, are subject to significant drift loss.

98G is pelletized for uniform distribution out of application equipment resulting in ideal spread and solubility. It also has the ability to be mixed with other dry fertilizers.

Learn more about the 98G Challenge and request an aglime sample collection kit.

 98G Lo Res

98G, October 18th, 5-10 mph winds.

 

Aglime Lo Res

Aglime, October 19th, 10-15 mph winds.

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I apply ag grade potassium...

How many farmers or dealers are applying a coarse ag grade, phosphorite, Kainite, or sylvinite

The answer is, almost none.

Why? Because highly efficient plant-available sources are available. While the cost of these products on a per ton basis is many times higher than the ore they are derived from, the per acre cost is lower due to the efficiencies gained through the processing and pelletizing or granulation of these materials. This makes the product less expensive and more effective on a per acre basis than shipping and applying many tons of a low grade ore.

Wouldn't it be great if there was someone who manufacted a highly efficient, very pure lime or gypsum product?

Lucky for the farmer there is. SuperCal 98G is the highest quality, highest efficiency liming material avaialble for agriculture. SuperCal SO4 is the country's most effective gypsum product.

Call us, we can show you how to increase yields while decreasing costs!

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, the blogronomist and VP of sales and marketing at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at blog.calciumproducts.com.

 

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Agronomist Reactions to The Soils Conference

On Jan 24th and 25th Calcium Products held a soil and fertility conference for its dealers and professional agronomist. Here is what some of the attendees had to say about the program.

 

 

We had a great turn out and would like to thank everyone who came out. Escpecially the speakers and those that contributed to the video footage!

You can see more vidoe of the conference here.

View the presentations here.

In the next few weeks we will have all of the presentations on our YouTube page. We'll let you know as soon as it's posted!

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Agronomist Reactions to The Soils Conference

On Jan 24th and 25th Calcium Products held a soil and fertility conference for its dealers and professional agronomist. Here is what some of the attendees had to say about the program.

 

 

We had a great turn out and would like to thank everyone who came out. Escpecially the speakers and those that contributed to the video footage!

You can see more vidoe of the conference here.

View the presentations here.

In the next few weeks we will have all of the presentations on our YouTube page. We'll let you know as soon as it's posted!

Read more...

Ag lime is a Service !?!

It’s been a great fall for spreading fertilizer and agricultural lime. Distributors are running short of fertilizer and the quarry next door to us is sold out of ag lime.
 
We talk with fertilizer dealer all the time about why they apply ag lime. Many say their customers demand it or its a service. Since the customer is always right we will deal with the first statement latter. So lets explore how ag lime is a service.
 
A service is "work done by one person or group that benefits another". How is the dealer serving its customers by selling them a poor quality product? If there are better products out there are you not serving them better by bringing them to their attention?
 
Storage
Many times to get access to enough ag lime it has to be stored off site from where it is made. Believe it or not, there are those that are actually paying to store lime in a building. This is slightly better than piling it in the field or out in the open, but is it the best use of resources? 
 
What if this building was full of potash, phosphates, or other hard to come by fertilizer? Better yet what if you had 98G in the building. Taking 98G in the summer months gives dealers a considerable cost savings. Taking product early can pay for storage in 3 years!
 
 
Owning dump trucks 
While most cooperatives are in the trucking business, I have only seen a few that own dump trucks.  I guess it makes sense if you have the staff and can find plenty of uses for this truck outside of lime season but, a used 2007 Mack dump truck will run you $70,000 to $90,000! Wouldn’t it make more sense to have someone in a floater. Sure you’ll spend more money on the floater but you'll be applying a product that actual works.
 
Utilizing equipment 
Once the ag lime gets to the field you need to get it loaded into the floater. You have two choices, a loader or conveyor. A Loader will run you $70,000-$100,000 plus operator and upkeep. A tow-able floater loader and pickup will be about half that and you still have another operator.
 
It doesn’t take any more equipment to put 98G in your warehouse and load it with existing equipment. In fact the more tons you move through existing fertilizer equipment the better a dealers margins are and that means they are able to better serve their customers.
 
Losing 25% or more to drift
A lot of very good quality lime is lost to drift. When ag lime forms a visible cloud it can be 80% or more ag lime.   
 
We are not making this up, the EPA set's opacity and visual emission standards! Ag lime loss to wind is very significant. If this field was an industrial manufacturing plant it could be subject to huge penalties!
 
  
Additional lime is lost in spreading.

Again the same principles apply when spreading. When I worked in ag retail and would stop by to ask for ag lime sales from farmers everyone would say, "you can have my business if you spread on a calm day". I have never talked with a farmer that was happy with the wind conditions his lime was spread in.

Even if it

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How Soil pH Affects Soil-Applied Herbicides

 

 

Note: This article is intended as a general guide to herbicides and soil pH. It is not a substitute for herbicide labels, nor promotes or discourages the use of any herbicide(s). All herbicides are names are trademarks of their respective manufactures.

 

 
Soil pH can make a big impact on soil-applied herbicides
Low soil pH (<6.2) will cause the triazine herbicides (Atrazine, Sencor) to be bound to the soil. When herbicides are adsorbed they are not effective at controlling weeds since they are not available in the soil solution. This is why pH sensitive herbicides like Atrazine, and Sencor can be used with less risk of crop injury in low pH soils. At low soil pH higher rates are need to control weeds. Crop injury increases when soil pH is higher.
 
When higher rates of herbicides are used in an attempt to get better weed control in low pH soils, herbicide residues in the soil increase. These bound herbicides are released if the soil is over-limed. If ag lime is postponed until just before planting, this release of bound herbicide can have serious detrimental effects on sensitive crops.
 
"Over-liming" Injury
Sometimes there are problems when soils are limed with large amounts of ag lime. Spreading high rates of lime than required or quickly raising a very acidic soil can cause crop injury. If there is a long history of triazine herbicides used, liming can release these chemicals and kill sensitive crops. Decreased crop growth because of "over-liming" injury is usually associated with lowered availability of phosphorus, potassium, or boron. Over-liming acidic sandy soils can produce zinc and copper deficiencies.
 
Poor crop performance due to nutrient deficiency is often blamed on Atrazine, and Sencor since problems do not develop until 2 to 3 weeks after emergence. Moldboard plowing can reduces phytotoxicity of Atrazine, and Sencor by diluting the herbicide residue in a large volume of soil. The best way to avoid these problems is to consistently maintain the soil pH above 6.2. Applying SuperCal 98G minimizes the adsorption of triazine herbicides to the soil and results in improved crop safety and performance. Properly limed fields will reduce the residual herbicide in the soil and avoid large release of bound herbicide causing crop injury.
 
Poor Performance and Carry-over
The half-life of many herbicides varies with soil characteristics and environment. For example, the half-life of atrazine in Georgia on a soil with a pH of 6.8 was reported to be 39 days, whereas in Minnesota the half-life was 261 days on a soil with a 7.9 pH. Whether a herbicide has basic, acidic or neutral properties can determine its ability to exist in the soil solution or adsorbed by soil solids. In general, herbicides whose pH is close to the pH of the soil are strongly adsorbed and are not subject t
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Change

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.  ~Author unknown

Life is about change. Change you socks, change your shoes, make change, change a tire, change the channel, a change in the weather, change seed varieties, change implements. Every day we change hundreds of things, many without thinking about it. Change is not a bad thing. Driving to work today in almost blizzard conditions I cannot wait for the weather to change.

If things didn’t change farming would not be possible. Farming needs change. The sky changes from night to day, the soil changes from black to rows of green. If things didn’t change you could not grow a crop. If you don’t change the way you farm from year to year, how do you expect to stay profitable?

What about your input supplier? Have they recommend changes to keep you profitable? What about you supplier that has not been able to get ag lime spread for the past 3 years because the weather has changed? Many climatologist are predicting that winters will be much more severe than the past 10 years. If they have not been able to spread the past three, are the next 10 going to be any better?

SuperCal 98G is a big change for farmers and agronomists. I understand that it is difficult understand how applying less lime gets better results. This is a huge change in thinking. Over ten years SuperCal 98G has shown to increase soil pH and yields. We would love to Prove It to you. Contact one of our sales representatives to find out how you can conduct an on farm trial.

Greg Ervin, MN, WI, ND, SD, North East IA, Canada
Glen Howell, NE, South and East IA, IL, MO, KS
Craig Dick, all other areas

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Calcium Products at the Iowa Power Farming Show

Last week was the Iowa Power Farming Show in Des Moines, Iowa. It is one of the largest shows in the Midwest. For the second year we sponsored the buses that gave people free rides from the free parking area a number of blocks from the exposition area. We had many great comments of appreciation for sponsoring the free parking and rides.

We also talked to farmers from central Illinois and Michigan that are using our products. They have found that its worth the drive for SuperCal 98G and SuperCal SO4, the highest quality lime and gypsum anywhere.

And this picture caught my eye.

SNC00005.jpg

What do rims and calcium chloride have to do with soils and crops? Well Phil Globig with Rim Guard discovered years ago that the calcium chloride used to add ballast to tires is highly corrosive. Phil’s company developed a better product that doesn’t ruin your rims.

So what happens when you apply 0-0-60 (KCl, muriate of potash) to your soil? Ever wonder what the Cl in KCl stands for? It is chloride. When you apply KCl to high pH soil you create calcium chloride. Wonder why that high priced seed corn keeps falling over? It’s tough to grow roots in soil that can rust tire rims.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Why you should consider a fertilizer grade lime

If you need to lime your fields why would you choose a product that takes 7 years to pay you back? Times of uncertainty and poor prices call for better efficiency, quicker return on your investment and a sharper pencil. SuperCal 98G is fertilizer grade lime.

Ag lime is at best a 50% effective liming agent. That is on its best day, but what about the drift on application day and uneven spreading? What about the drift after application? What about the water that's in the ag lime when you bought it? How much water did you buy? What about the big boulders that show up in you lime load? In the field you might get 25% effectiveness from a ton of ag lime.

SuperCal 98G is proven to increase yield when applied with potash when lime is needed. Having the proper pH makes phosphorus more available. Having enough calcium in the soil increases root mass and improves plant health.

You're going to spend $5-10 per year on lime anyway, why would you wait until you have a problem to add lime? Maintain proper pH like you maintain proper P and K levels and make more money this year, not 7 years from now.

SuperCal 98G is a fertilizer grade lime, it is 98% pure calcium carbonate, ground extremely fine to make it a 91% effective liming agent. It is pelletized to standard fertilizer grade prills, making blending with all dry fertilizer easy. It's effectiveness means you get results in this cropping year.

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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ABOUT OUR BLOGRONOMIST PAGE

Maintained by Craig Dick, blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing, we have a wide array of blog articles from Craig and some expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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