Calcium Products - Displaying items by tag: pelletized gypsum
Calcium Product 98G

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How to repair sodic soils

Sodium problems are becoming more widespread

Sodic soils are one of the most difficult challenges facing turf managers in areas where they exist. With the rise of effluent water use for golf course and athletic field irrigation, sodium problems are becoming more widespread than they were in the past. High levels of sodium create a toxic environment for plant health and destroy the physical structure of soils.

Sodium becomes a problem when it reaches levels that overwhelm the natural equilibrium of the soil. It causes soil clay particles to swell and disperse, causing soil pores to become blocked, limiting water infiltration and drainage of the soil. Plants trying to grow in sodic soils exhibit symptoms of drought due to excessive uptake of sodium and lack of water infiltration into the soil where roots normally grow.

Check out our document on using SO4 and 98G to manage sodium affected soils.

Del Norte High School in San Diego, California

Below are before and after photos of Del Norte High School's baseball field in San Diego, California. After extensive soil testing, it was identified that sodium levels were at toxic levels for quality turfgrass growth and that the Calcium/Magnesium ratios were dramatically off. 98G, our pelletized limestone, was applied at 10 lbs/1000 ft2 every three to four weeks from June to November for a total of about eight applications.

Below: Del Norte High School third base line in June 2016.

Del Norte 3rd Baseline Before

Below: Del Norte High School third base line in November 2016.

Del Notre 3rd Base Line After

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Soybean Nodules Adversely Affected by Low Soil pH

Soybean Harvest

Soybean nodules supply plant available nitrogen

Nodules on soybean roots are formed by a specific genus of soil-borne bacteria, Rhizobium, which form a symbiotic relationship with the plant. The nodules fix nitrogen from the atmosphere and transform it into plant available nitrogen, while the plant supplies necessary nutrients and energy for the bacteria to multiply and thrive.

Typically, nitrogen fixation via nodules supplies most of the nitrogen that a soybean crop needs during a given year and additional nitrogen applications are not advised as that can have a detrimental effect on nodules. If there is nitrogen available from applied fertilizer, the relationship between the nodules and the plants suffer, ultimately hindering the ability of the nodules to fix nitrogen. It’s a costly move for both growers and the plant-bacteria interaction.

Nodules hindered by low soil pH

Nodule formation and performance is hindered by soil pH below 5.7. Many fields in the Midwest have areas of the field, or wide expanses with values at or below this level. The acidification from nitrogen sources applied during corn rotations continue to drive pH values lower.

When ammonium sulfate (AMS) is used to supply sulfur for soybean crops, a two-headed monster is working against achieving maximum yield. First, nitrogen is being applied, which can hinder nodule formation and performance. Second, AMS is the most acidifying fertilizer used in agriculture today, and that acidity can further degrade nodules.

SO4 – a pH neutral sulfur source

SO4, which is pelletized gypsum, is a pH neutral sulfur source. Its natural solubility meets plant needs for sulfur throughout the growing season. An added benefit is the addition of calcium to replace that lost in the previous season’s harvest.

Increased soybean acres projected for 2017

Due to various agricultural economic metrics, 2017 appears to be on track for the largest soybean crop ever planted in the United States. The USDA predicts 85.5 million acres planted this year, 1.8 million more than last year.

Soybean and nodule health will be more important than ever with the predicted increase in acres planted. Ensure you are making the best decisions for crop health, including nodules, to maximize yields.

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Rescuing Sulfur Deficiency with Topdress Application of SO4

SO4 vs No Sulfur

Photo above: 2016 sulfur trial on corn in Kanawha, Iowa at the ISU Northern Research Farm. SO4 applied at 150 lbs/acre (left) and no sulfur applied (right). SO4 application resulted in a 30 bu/acre increase compared to no sulfur.

Expect Sulfur Deficiency

With seemingly endless rainfall this spring, we can expect widespread sulfur deficiency as corn continues to emerge. The problem is that sulfate is easily leached from where the young corn roots need it in wet years. Sulfur deficiency shows up in the youngest leaves of the plant, and consists of green and yellow stripes in the leaves. Many confuse nitrogen deficiency with sulfur deficiency, and the most likely scenario is that it’s sulfur and not nitrogen since most growers typically put out more than enough nitrogen to meet crop needs.

To compound this problem, wet springs often mean that sulfur applications were skipped or postponed in lieu of getting seed in the ground during short windows of opportunity. Further, most sulfur sources that can quickly supply sulfur to the crop via topdress application have high burn potential.

Topdress SO4

SO4 is the perfect sulfur source for any application scenario, but the ability to topdress SO4 without any concern over crop burn makes it stand out against other sources.

Research conducted at Iowa State University with SO4 has shown that green-up will occur in less than 1 week with topdress applications up to V6.

SO4 Application Rates

How much sulfur you need to apply for your crop depends on your soil type. In coarse textured soils with low organic matter content, shoot for about 25 lbs of sulfur per acre (150 lbs/acre of SO4); for finer textured soils with 3% organic matter or more, application rates closer to 17 lbs of sulfur per acre should suffice (100 lbs/acre of SO4).

It’s hard to accurately predict where and when sulfur deficiency will occur, but you can save your yield potential and correct in-season sulfur deficiency with topdress applications of SO4.

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Meet our Updated Product Names and Logos

 

We have some exciting news to share! We are shortening our product names to 98G and SO4 and have created a new logo for each. Yes, we are retiring the “SuperCal” language in an effort to simplify the product names for more clear communication.

We are committed to growing brand recognition for 98G and SO4, and we’ll be updating materials over the next year.

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What is SuperCal SO4?

Over the past few weeks, people have asked is what is SuperCal SO4?

SuperCal SO4 is pelletized gypsum, however we put in a crazy amount of extra time and effort to ensure our products are highly effective. We call it the SuperCal Advantage and it consists of three components

Purity                          Particle Size                       Precision 

Purity

SuperCal SO4 is a true dihydrate gypsum mined from one of the purest sources of gypsum on earth. Many people think, gypsum is gypsum, however science shows us this is just not so. Check out this test from Pace Turf .

gypusm bars

We’ve also spent extra time and effort to test many sources of gypsum, and none compare to SuperCal.

Particle Size Matters

When it comes to mined gypsum, none are ground finer prior to pellitization than SuperCal. The combination of purity and particle size results in the highest dissolution rates in the industry.

Why I am telling you this?

Gypsum is a rock, and if you cannot get it to dissolve in the soil solution it won’t work. Gypsum, limestone and fertilizer all must dissolve in the soil solution to be effective! Large particles don’t react in enough time for you to see benefit from it.

We Pelletize for Precision

The reason we pelletize is to ensure our very pure, finely ground SuperCal SO4 spreads evenly for maximum effectiveness. With nearly 30 years in the industry, we have perfected a formulation resulting in low dust and precise spreading on every acre. Poorly applied product costs the grower yield.

A study from Virginia Tech confirms what the farmer knows, “The results of this research proved conclusively that non–uniform application of fertilizers resulted in less total yield than uniformly applied fertilizers even though the same total rate per acre had been applied in each case. The loss in yield due to lower than recommended rates of application far exceeded the slight increase in yield obtained from excess application over the recommended rate.”

clumps stipes  

 Whether its wet or dry, bulk gypsum won’t spread well.

The other issue with finely ground gypsum is drift loss. The chart below was developed from a USDA program that was developed to predict the motion of spray material released from various devices connected to an aircraft. Values and assumptions were modified to match that of a dry material in a rotary spreader in an agricultural setting.

drift

 Based on this work, you could see up to 25% or more drift from a bulk applied product. The finer and dryer a product, the farther and greater the drift!

Only SuperCal SO4 ensures you the highest quality, most effective product in the market, backed by over 20 years of success and farms all across North America.

Here is one mutli-year study by Iowa State. Wider yield differences were experienced early in the study due to application on known sulfur deficient soils. Regardless, the consistent yield improvements speak for themselves.

 

ISU Trial data

For farmers that demand consistent repeatable responses from their inputs, SuperCal SO4 is the only market proven product. If you still have questions, give anyone of our staff a call!

More Helpful Links:

SuperCal SO4 Product Page

More Test Plot Results

Product Videos

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!                           

 

 

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Agronomist Reactions to The Soils Conference

On Jan 24th and 25th Calcium Products held a soil and fertility conference for its dealers and professional agronomist. Here is what some of the attendees had to say about the program.

 

 

We had a great turn out and would like to thank everyone who came out. Escpecially the speakers and those that contributed to the video footage!

You can see more vidoe of the conference here.

View the presentations here.

In the next few weeks we will have all of the presentations on our YouTube page. We'll let you know as soon as it's posted!

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Agronomist Reactions to The Soils Conference

On Jan 24th and 25th Calcium Products held a soil and fertility conference for its dealers and professional agronomist. Here is what some of the attendees had to say about the program.

 

 

We had a great turn out and would like to thank everyone who came out. Escpecially the speakers and those that contributed to the video footage!

You can see more vidoe of the conference here.

View the presentations here.

In the next few weeks we will have all of the presentations on our YouTube page. We'll let you know as soon as it's posted!

Read more...

Calcium Products at the Iowa Power Farming Show

Last week was the Iowa Power Farming Show in Des Moines, Iowa. It is one of the largest shows in the Midwest. For the second year we sponsored the buses that gave people free rides from the free parking area a number of blocks from the exposition area. We had many great comments of appreciation for sponsoring the free parking and rides.

We also talked to farmers from central Illinois and Michigan that are using our products. They have found that its worth the drive for SuperCal 98G and SuperCal SO4, the highest quality lime and gypsum anywhere.

And this picture caught my eye.

SNC00005.jpg

What do rims and calcium chloride have to do with soils and crops? Well Phil Globig with Rim Guard discovered years ago that the calcium chloride used to add ballast to tires is highly corrosive. Phil’s company developed a better product that doesn’t ruin your rims.

So what happens when you apply 0-0-60 (KCl, muriate of potash) to your soil? Ever wonder what the Cl in KCl stands for? It is chloride. When you apply KCl to high pH soil you create calcium chloride. Wonder why that high priced seed corn keeps falling over? It’s tough to grow roots in soil that can rust tire rims.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Increasing Crop Quality with Calcium

Some harvesting is taking place and with that comes grain storage. How do you make sure that your grain stays in good condition when storing it on farm? Dry it with costly natural gas or propane, run the fans until Christmas, fumigate, pray???

I found this great article from Greg Patterson on Calcium Nutrition in Plants. If there are other crops calcium can improve the quality and longevity of storage why should grain be any different.

A number of our customers have mentioned that grain storage problems have all but disappeared once they started using our products. This is something we will be doing research on in the future.

While I have not run the numbers, if your spending lots of money on drying costs and fumigation, you likely have low plant available calcium. Why not fix you soil, reduce your drying and storage costs and avoid a crop loss due to spoilage.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Treating pet burns with SuperCal SO4

In a past blog on burn problems on turf I told you how SuperCal SO4 can help eliminate pet burn spots. I wanted to show you how well it works.

I have a 2 year old Great Dane. Since our road is very busy, we let him out on a lead to do his business. I thought I had him trained to go around to the side yard near the field. I guess with the cold windy winter he wanted to do it out of the wind, right in front of the house.

Since I do not farm, my yard is my crop and I take pride in making it look nice. A spotted dog is fine but a spotted lawn is not. To take care of the spots, I spread SuperCal SO4 at 40#/1000 sq ft on April 1st. There has been significant improvement.

 April_1.jpg

 SuperCal SO4 applied April 1

 May_1.jpg

 Yard 30 days after application

 

May_15.jpg

 Yard 45 days after application - As you can see there is still some spotting left, I will treat those spots tonight by hand.

 

 Yard_080715_blog.jpg

 I hand treated the pet spots on May 19th, This picture was taken on July 16. While there are still a few small spots left most are completely closed in!

 

For a few of the tougher spots, I will be applying a new formula to see if it works any better.

 

I'll keep you updated on the progress.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Maintained by our team of experts, we have a wide array of blog articles from our experts and guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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