Calcium Products - Displaying items by tag: aglime
Calcium Product 98G

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Take the 98G Challenge – See How Your Aglime Stacks Up.

Challenge Blog Image

Do you know how effective your aglime is in changing soil pH?

Below are two photos comparing 98G, our pelletized lime product, to aglime being spread in a field near Boxholm, Iowa. The photos illustrate that the finest particles in aglime, although the most effective at changing soil pH, are subject to significant drift loss.

98G is pelletized for uniform distribution out of application equipment resulting in ideal spread and solubility. It also has the ability to be mixed with other dry fertilizers.

Learn more about the 98G Challenge and request an aglime sample collection kit.

 98G Lo Res

98G, October 18th, 5-10 mph winds.

 

Aglime Lo Res

Aglime, October 19th, 10-15 mph winds.

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What you get with ag lime

For many years pelletized lime has been cast off as too expensive, renter’s lime, or a quick fix. Ag lime has been regarded as long lasting, what land owners use to make long term fixes. There are a number of other things that I think of when I think of ag lime;

Drift
Unfortunately the best portion of lime is most likely to drift. Even if you’re the one farmer that gets his lime spread on a calm day, the floater is traveling 10-15 mph, and throwing the lime out at 70+ pounds per square inch. There is no other way to avoid drift than to pelletize the lime.

precision ag lime 3 2

Poor Spreading
You paid for VRT/GPS spreading, not stripped fields

lime stripes Copy

Slow ROI
In a University of Nebraska on Farm Research project they considered a 2-ton application of ag lime had a 5-10 year life span. It took 4 years to get enough yield response to cover the cost. If I were spending $40 per acre I would expect that money to have a better return than 2 bushels in the first 2 years!
UNL Research

Application Problems
Large patches of compaction, piles of stalks, areas that are over limed. Do they do that for free…..

lime dump

At equivalent rates SuperCal 98G is the same cost or less than ag lime.
Renters us it because it works, returning their investment the year it is applied.
You wouldn’t put on 7 years worth of phosphates or potassium, put on only what you need, and conserve your money for something else.
Reduce the headaches, increase yields, quickly, spread only the lime you need for the next couple of years.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Fall Update

It's been a busy summer for us at Calcium Products. The website got a face lift, the SO4 plant has been expanded, and new products have been developed and tested.

The building for the expansion has been completed. We are now waiting for the last of the production line equipment. We are hoping for the installation of the equipment to be finished before the end of the year.

There has been incredible demand for SuperCal SO4 this past year and we are currently sold out for the rest of the year. The plant expansion will allow us to increase production of SuperCal SO4 by 50%.

We have been testing a number of new products over the summer. While most are still in the development stage, and I cannot talk much about them, I can talk about HydraSave. HydraSave is our Ultra Premium Greens Grade Gypsum. HydraSave is an ultra small prill, eliminating the dust that comes with powdered products, but allows you to spread it in the morning, water and play golf with no residual product.

We will be launching HydraSave in spring of '08. We have already received a number of request from top course superintendents across the midwest. We have tested this product for a number of years, it transformed Spring Valley, see what it can do for your course.

This fall proves to be busy as well. The tradeshow circuit is in full swing. We had a booth at the Redwood Falls Farm Show, and talked with many of customers and friends from Minnesota and Iowa. This coming weekend we will be down at Springfield, MO at the Ozark Fall Farm Fest.

It is that time of year for fertilizer and lime spreading. We have been working hard to explain the difference of 98G over ag lime. I think the following picture explains it best.

lime_truck.jpg     

I don't know anyone that would throw money in the air, watching it blow across the county. This is exactly what happens when you spread ag lime. The portion of lime that does you any good, does not even land on your property.

Make your expensive fertilizer work harder for you, buy lime that actually lands in your field. Use SuperCal 98 Pelletized lime.

Calcium Products, lower input costs, higher yields, keeping you informed

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!  

 

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Ag Lime Myths

A pound of lime is a pound of lime. It takes the same amount of lime to change pH no matter what form it is in. Pel lime doesn't have the lasting power that ag lime has. These are some comments made when people refer to pel lime. While they seem accurate, in truth they are costing you money.

Lime is not created equal. Lime is the generic term for calcium carbonate. Pure calcium carbonate is also called calcite. Lime on the other hand can vary in purity, form 50% to 175% CCE. Lime products that are over 100% generally contain elements such as Magnesium, or are considered hazardous, such as hydrated lime.

While it does take the same amount of calcium carbonate in a lab setting to neutralize low pH, in the field it is another situation. In order for lime to neutralize pH in needs to first be applied to the acid soil. Which is sometimes an impossible thing to achieve with a finely ground powder. Even on days when the wind is not blowing, applying ag lime with spinners launches the lime into the air, allowing it to drift for miles.

Once the lime gets to the soil it needs to be finely ground to achieve a pH change. Most ag lime is a 20-mesh average screen size. Lime that is meshed larger than 30 mesh will only be 5-50% effective the first year. After 4 years it will only be 15-50% effective. A product that is only 50% effective is an incredible waste of time and money.

 

 

 precision_ag_lime_3.JPG  
   Effective fine lime drifts, wasting you money  

 

The reason that ag lime seems to last long is, because of the mesh size, it doesn't breakdown and do much good for 3-4 years. What other ag input sells it self on not providing a return on investment for 3 -4 years? The fact is that none do.

Today's times of low margin, high cost inputs demands that your dollars work as hard as possible. Get yield response the first year, pH increase with every application. Make your high dollar fertilizers work for you. Don't let them be tied up by low pH. Feed the soil what it needs to stimulate

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!  

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....isn't that renters lime?

This weekend while talking with some friends, I was asked about pelletized lime. One friend said his agronomist called pel-lime renters lime. He wanted to know why as a landowner he would want to use SuperCal 98G.

Why have renters used 98G? It costs less, you see yield results the first cropping year.

In most cases, 300- 400 pounds of SuperCal 98G, every other year, on a corn-bean rotation will raise soil pH. The cost of 300-400 lbs applied is usually in the $20-$25, or $10-$12.50 per year for liming (could be less depending on pH).

Compare that to applying AgLime waiting 3 years for pH to rise then waiting to re-apply for 2 more years until the pH falls again. You will pay $20-$25 per ton of AgLime, and most people put on 2-3 tons when they apply it. So you pay $40-$75 to put on AgLime, wait 3 years for it to make a small change, then watch it fall for two. This roller coaster is costing you $8-$15 per year.

That does not include the cost of lost yield. In trails, SuperCal 98G has shown 4.5-bushel advantage over AgLime in soybeans. At today’s commodity prices, you could be leaving $40 dollars in the field.

But don’t you have to apply the product more often? AgLime last longer, right?

The longevity of AgLime is a misconception. It only seems to “last” longer, because it takes longer to break down in the field. Most AgLime has large particle size lime that takes years to breakdown. You would not buy seed, chemical, or fertilizer that took years to go to work, why would you buy lime that takes years to work?

Discover what renters have known for years, SuperCal 98G works in weeks, not years.

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!  

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New Technology for Improved Production

Hanging in my garage are my great-grandfather's harness he used when he farmed. My wife asked why? Sentimental reasons, I like history, I think they’re kind of cool. They don’t do anything but take up space; I don’t go to nostalgic farm shows and give demonstrations. I certainly would not farm today using them.

There are always improvements in farming. Could you meet today’s productivity with yesterday’s technology? Are you still farming with a John Deere model "720”? Are you waiting to hear grain prices on the news, or do you get real-time quotes on the Internet? Did you plant a triple stack corn or saved seed?

Have you been trying to raise pH and increase yield with AgLime? While applying tons of AgLime looks like you are really accomplishing something, unfortunately, like a 720, when the dust clears, it costs too much to do, and does not really accomplish much.

SuperCal 98G is the pelletizied lime product to meet today’s ROI and production goals. Why spend 3-5 years for results? Would you wait 3 years for your seed to grow, or your nitrogen to be utilized? If you equipment dealer told you to pay him today and he’d get you that 9660 in 3 years, would you look for a new dealer?

Calcium Products, Increasing yields, reducing costs, for today’s high production goals.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!  

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Price of ice cream

I just read a story about how expensive ice cream has become this summer. The price of a gallon of milk is up 55% the story reports. The price of a small cone has rose from $2.95 to $3.50.

 

So what does the price of ice cream have to do with soil? I'm getting to that!

 

The story claims that this is due to the rising price of corn used to feed dairy cows. I don’t doubt that the cost of feed is more expensive, but the cost of fuel, fertilizer, and any other inputs in farming are also up. It’s a vicious cycle, where the farmer rarely wins. It seems impossible to cut costs when the price of finished goods doubles overnight. 

 

How does one combat increasing input costs, and volatile prices?

 

Focus on the things you can control.

 

A study by the Iowa Soybean Association compared the increased profit per acre on many Iowa farms. They found that 50% of their increased profit came from increasing yield. While it is hard to control the price of ice cream it is far easier to manage your crops to increase yields.

 

It starts with the soil.

 

It does no good to plant the best Triple Stack seed corn if you do not take care of your soil. According to Midwest Labs, low pH (5.7) will reduce the genetic yield potential of corn by 17%. That’s 34 bushels on 200-bushel farm average! Even if corn were still 2 bucks at least $60 would be lost before planting begins. With today’s prices that’s over $100 dollars in profit lost per acre.

 

You could spend all that profit applying AgLime and waiting 3-5 years for a return on that money. Another option is to do nothing, cut your losses, and blame poor profitability on falling prices and the rising costs of inputs.

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Discontinuing the eletter

We at Calcium Products, Inc., are extremely excited about our new website. The folks from Insight Advertising, Marketing & Communications did a great job getting the design right. Our other partner DWebware have done a great job getting it running.

Many of our customers have enjoyed getting "First Things First", Calcium Products eletter. We are discontinuing the eletter in favor of this blog. The benefit of this blog is that it is searchable, allows for more information to be shared, and lets you the customer leave comments or ask questions. We think that ability will be of greater value than the eletter.

Like the eletter, we will use this blog to continue to provide educational information on SuperCal 98G (not Pel-Lime), SuperCal (not Cal-Sul), SO4, soil amendments, the benefits of 98G over Aglime, how to improve your soil, yield, and lower costs.

There are few resources out there dedicated to improving soils. The topics we'll address in this blog will show that we are serious about improving your soil, growing better crops, and reducing input costs.

If there are topics that you'd like discussed leave a comment. Also stay up to date by signing up for the e-mail notification.

We look forward to helping you!

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Calcium Products BLOG - Welcome

Welcome to the brand new business blog for Calcium Products, Inc. The regular host and voice of the BLOG is Craig Dick. My job today is to get it started and introduce you to some of the most amazing products designed to increase your crop yield while decreasing your costs.

For years producers have used traditional ag lime to adjust their soil pH. The recommended amount can be anywhere from 1,500 to 3,000 pounds per acre. Meanwhile with SuperCal 98-G, a pellet product, a producer only has to use 400 pounds per acre.

How can that be?

Well, what you're not being told is that much of the ag-lime spread on fields simply does not work...or it blows away. For lime to work effectively the particle size needs to be small but not so small that it powders and drifts from the field. Or, if the ag-lime is wet, farmers pay for water.

So, what is the difference between traditional ag-lime and SuperCal 98G?

Two big and important things:

SuperCal 98G is 98% Pure. It just does not get any better.

We grind this pure product and then create small pellets that are pretty uniform in size. The result is the product goes right to the soil and starts working right away.
Over the next few months we invite you to come back and learn more about SuperCal 98-G and the other products made by Calcium Products. And, because this is a business blog it can be a two way method of communication. Go ahead, ask Craig a question. He'll respond.

Thanks for reading the Blog and stay tuned for more ways you can lower costs while increasing yield.

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SuperCal 98G vs. Ag Lime

SuperCal 98G, Pel-Lime, and Ag Limestone were broadcast on soybeans in fall 1999 to evaluate their ability to enhance soybean seedling vigor, stand establishment and yield response.

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Maintained by Craig Dick, blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing, we have a wide array of blog articles from Craig and some expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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