Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: April 2012
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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: April 2012

21st Century Agronomic Illiterates

 Alvin Toffler, former editor of Fortune magazine, writer and futurist said "The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn"

What have you had to unlearn and relearn in regards to agronomic principles?

 

Leave your comments below or head over to our Facebook page and leave us a comment!

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

 

 

 

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North American Soils Lack Zinc

While its true calcium may be King, all nutrients have an important part to play in plant health and high yields. I just saw an article on the lack of zinc in North American Soils. Of 4.4 million tests taken in 2010 37% showed less than 1 ppm Zn, with 16% of those less than 0.5 ppm. 

You can order the full IPNI report Soil Test leaves in North America 2010 by clicking on the previous link.

Zinc is a component of enzymes including auxins (plant growth hormones). It is essential to carbohydrate metabolism, protein synthesis and internodal elongation (stem growth). 

 

Here is a great post by AgriGold Hybrids on Zinc.

Here is a summary of the post:

... showed a 53 bushel increase in yield by adding one pound of zinc to a starter. 

 

...common symptoms associated with zinc deficiency in corn results in a white or yellow band that runs parallel with the mid rib. Other problems associated with zinc deficiency include:

• Poor root development
• Stunted growth
• Small leaves
• Shortened internodes
• Delayed silking and tasseling
• Chalky kernels

There is also the hidden deficiency that has no symptoms.  Hidden zinc deficiencies are well documented in corn and reductions in yield can be up to 40%.  Therefore the best method to determine if zinc is deficient is by taking soil samples to determine the levels of zinc in the soil.

Calcium Product's Note: It is well documented that many deficiencies can take up to 2 weeks to show visual response and up to 2 more weeks to correct. This whole time you are losing yield you cannot recover.

Don't let your yields suffer from hidden hunger, make sure you include micronutrients as part of your fertility program.

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

 

 

 

 

 

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Loaded burgers

Grilling out is one of my favorite summer activities. And, of course, I always want farm-fresh food; it's the tastiest! My latest burger creation has been very popular and is oft-requested already so thought I'd pass it along.

Warning, I rarely measure when I cook so the measurements are open to your own interpretation!

Loaded garden burgers
2lb ground beef
2 eggs
Spinach, torn up into pieces
Mushrooms, diced
Green & red peppers, diced
Onions, diced
Shredded cheese
Garlic salt
Sprinkle of pepper

Mix everything in a bowl so everything is moist and will stick together. Ball it up in your hand and make into a round patty. Spray non-stick oil on the grill and fire it up to cook your patties!

Beware, you'll get rave reviews and have to make them again soon!

 

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  • Published in Corn

Shuckin' corn

There's nothing better than a fresh ear of corn with butter, salt & pepper. (Am I right?)  I usually steam it but I also like it grilled. Either way I've always shucked it then cooked it. So I am eager to try the shucking technique this guy shares: 

Have you ever done that? Looks pretty slick! 

How do you prefer to eat fresh summer sweet corn?

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

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PFI field days

weeding-fieldWe are proud to be a major sponsor of the Practical Farmers of Iowa field days this year. Topics range from pesticide drift monitoring to strip-tillate, organic crops, no-till, GMOs, tree crops and more. You'll hear research results and discuss innovative practices while networking with your fellow Iowa farmer. It sounds like you'd meet some pretty amazing folks and taste some delicious food too! Learn more about the field days and how you can attend.

Here's the full lineup:

  • MAY 31, AMES
  • JUNE 5, BREDA
  • JUNE 9, WAUKON
  • JUNE 12, SHELBY
  • JUNE 13, MAXWELL
  • JUNE 14, WAVERLY
  • JUNE 20, MANNING
  • JUNE 21, OSAGE
  • JUNE 21, KNOXVILLE
  • JUNE 23, OXFORD
  • JUNE 24, SOLON
  • JULY 7, MCCALLSBURG
  • JULY 15, DECORAH
  • JULY 18, LOVILIA
  • JULY 20, WAVERLY
  • JULY 23, LAKE VIEW
  • AUGUST 1, ALTA
  • AUGUST 3, ADEL
  • AUGUST 4, WAUKON
  • AUGUST 7, STANTON
  • AUGUST 9, WINFIELD
  • AUGUST 17, KEYSTONE
  • AUGUST 21, TAYLOR COUNTY
  • AUGUST 24, BRANDON
  • AUGUST 26, MARSHALLTOWN
  • SEPTEMBER 8, SOLON
  • SEPTEMBER 13, JEFFERSON
  • SEPTEMBER 14, RIVER FALLS, WI
  • SEPTEMBER 15, WAPELLO
  • SEPTEMBER 16, IOWA FALLS
  • SEPTEMBER 18, PAULLINA
  • SEPTEMBER 22, POLK & STORY COUNTIES
  • SEPTEMBER 26, EMMETSBURG
  • OCTOBER 4, MECHANICSVILLE
  • OCTOBER 7, KNOXVILLE & LACONA PASTURE WALKS
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Oceans, glaciers, volcanos & giants…A look @ Iowa’s past

One of the many reasons Calcium Products has premium products is the extremely high-quality, pure limestone and gypsum we use. I thought it’d be interesting to share some of Iowa’s history that made our lime and gypsum so amazing. It also contributes to the rich Iowa farmland we hear lots about. Check out this article from IPTV about the land history. Below is an excerpt:

Iowa has been under water in one form or another for much of its history. Ancient seas covered Iowa while it was located near the equator. For millions of years, the continental plate on which Iowa sits has slowly wandered around the globe. At one time the plate split apart, creating a rift. Then it moved back together. Several other times, it crashed into other plates. These crashes caused parts of the land to get pushed up out of the water. These earth-quaking events often formed mountains. The oldest mountain remnants in Iowa are found as Sioux Quartzite in the northwest corner of the state. 

When the land was above water, waves and rain worked to wear away the rocks. When plates crashed together again, the land often got pushed back down. While underwater, the land became covered with layers of sediment. Each layer of sediment holds clues to the past. Some layers have fossil crinoids, trilobites or even tree pollen. Most of these layers are buried under newer rocks and soil. But the bluffs that line the Mississippi River in northeast Iowa are an exposed outcrop of ancient sea sediments.

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How Limestone is formed

To understand how limestone is formed one has to look at the the global carbon cycle.  You may already be familiar with the nitrogen cycle, sulfur cycle, and the water cycle 

 
We all know that animals and humans exhale carbon dioxide. This is how we create energy. We take in oxygen and it combines with sugars and we exhale carbon and water. Glucose is a typical food and the metabolic reaction can be represented by:

C6H12O6+ 6 O2®6 CO2+ 6 H2O

 
Plants and green bacteria, produce oxygen and consumes carbon dioxide in its photosynthesis. Energy in the form of electromagnetic radiation or photons from the sun is supplied so that the plants convert low-energy-content carbon dioxide into high-energy-content glucose. The photosynthesis reaction is represented by:
 

6 CO2+ 12 H2O --h v®C6H12O6+ 6 O2+ 6 H2O

 
Plants and animals make food for each other. The plants convert sunlight into high-energy food for the animals. Water is a reaction medium and a product of photosynthesis. Radioactive labeled studies show that the oxygen in the water produced from photosynthesis is the same oxygen from the carbon dioxide.
 
You may be thinking that crops and plants with leaves, like trees, lawns, and flowers are the main source of oxygen production. In fact, primitive plants in the ocean play a more important role in in the photosynthesis process, because sheer numbers of them.
 
Speaking of the ocean, it is the largest sink of carbon dioxide in the world. Carbon dioxide is heavier than the surrounding atmosphere and sinks to the lowest spot in the landscape. Carbon dioxide sinks to reach sea level and then interacts with the water where it dissolves in water to form carbonic acid:

CO2+ H2O®H2CO3
H2CO3
®H++ HCO3-     Ka1= 4.2x10-7
HCO3-
®H++ CO32-     Ka2= 4.8x10-11

tac450
 
The dissolved carbon dioxide or carbonic acid in the ocean further re
acts with 
metal ions in the water forming calcium and magnesium carbonates. Extensive limestone (CaCO3) and dolomite (mixture of CaCO3 and MgCO3) have been formed this way. The Gilmore City quarry was nearthe equator and a shallow sea about 450 million years ago and our limestone was deposited in this way!
 
 
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Maintained by Craig Dick, blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing, we have a wide array of blog articles from Craig and some expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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