Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: August 2011
Calcium Product 98G

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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: August 2011

Lots of Fires! - Update

There have been many fires in Humboldt County the past week. Out local newspaper the Humboldt Indpendent did a nice job covering those fires.

For the official story on the farmer that was burned

A great story on how the neighbors help finish his harvest

 

 

This has been a rough week for combine fires, this morining started with a news story from WHO -13  Des Moines on combine fires. While this fire around Story City was bad we have had at least 3 fires in the Gilmore City area. At least that is all I saw driving between Gilmore and Fort Dodge.

This fire was only 2 miles from our plant

 

Please make sure you clear your machine of excess trash each night, we would hate to see you in this situation.

We are very dry up here and it's not only combines that are catching fire but stalk choppers and tractors too. I was told that the farmer involved in this fire had to be life flighted to Des Moines with severe face and arm burns. We wish him a speady recovery

As you can see it looks like the local news van is on scene. As soon as we get the offical details we will update this article.

Please stay safe and have a great harvest!

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Copper

You may be reading a lot in the news lately about copper. Thieves are stealing it off of houses, off of working power grids, and even churches.  While thieves looting copper gets the headlines, how much have you read about adding copper to your fertility program? The lack of copper in your soil could be costing you big money. Yield reductions of 70-100% have been recorded due to copper deficiency. In copper deficient Canadian soils, inclusion of copper could increase yields by 100 million dollars for Canada alone!
 
Copper deficiency has been found throughout the world in all climatic zones where crops are grown or animals kept on farms.  Its incidence varies according to soil, crop, livestock and management factors.  In particular it can occur in crops growing on soils with a sandy texture, on those rich in organic matter and on calcareous soils, but other soil factors can also cause a deficiency.
 
Wheat, barley and flax are not very efficient in copper uptake, and typically respond well to copper, though Alfalfa has been found to respond well too.
 
Symptoms of Copper Deficiency
Wheat and barley deficient in copper are more likely to lodge. Copper deficiency can delay flowering by up-to two weeks and result in pollen sterility. Pig tailing and leaf yellowing in young tillers is a common sign of copper deficiency in wheat, barley and oats. 
 
Reasons for Deficiency
Copper is pretty immobile in the soil. Of all the copper on a soil test, an average of 50% is insoluble and unavailable, 30% is bound to organic sites, 15% is in an oxide form, and only 5% is available for plant uptake. 
 
Soils are considered deficient in copper when they contain less than 2 ppm. Howvever, even when soils have adequate copper (30-50 ppm) other factors such as high pH, and  organic matter can reduce copper availability.  Soil pH above 6.4 can limit copper uptake. Copper concentration in soil solution decreases sharply as pH increase. Copper is 10 -100 times more available at a 6 pH than at 7. 
 
Copper is more strongly bound to soil organic matter that any other micronutrient. Copper deficiency is primarily found on high organic matter soils. Applications of copper not only increase crop production but also reduces the decomposition of organic matter, increasing the sustainability and health of the soil.
 
In addition to soil factors, other fertilizer can interact with copper. High rates of nitrogen can accentuate copper deficiency. Soils high in iron, manganese, molybdenum or zinc can also limit plant uptake of copper. Copper is most strongly adsorbed to iron and aluminum, another reason to avoid by-product liming materials.  Copper toxicity is rare and generally only occurs with long-term use of copper pesticides in orchards or from applications of by-products and sludges high in copper.
 
Adding Copper into your fertilizer program
Soil incorporation of copper is the best long term solution to solving copper deficiency. Copper sulfates, oxysulfates and our forth coming MicroHume product are great sources of dry granular copper to add to a dry program. While foliar applications should  be used on crops that are copper sensitive or need an immediate dose of copper. Wheat does not respond to foliar applications of copper after anthesis, and may actually reduce yield a
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I tested a car and found cars to be unreliable!

Last week was the lime conference in Portland Oregon, were we meet some really smart people and a lot of new friends. One of those new friends sent me a note this morning.

 
Craig,
 
I read a response that stated the following:  "Studies at Michigan State University found the Pelletized Lime to have a Slower Rate of Reaction Compared to Good Quality Ag Lime Applied at Recommended Rates."  Craig, Because of the Surface Area of Pelletized Lime Being Greater than the Surface Area of Regular Ag Lime, How can a University Make this Statement?  You and I both know that the Surface Area of the Calcium Carbonate in Pelletized Lime is Far Greater than the Surface Area of Any Ag Lime.
 
Thanks,
Gene
 
 
My Response:
Gene,
Picture source:  www.wired.com/autopa/2010/05/jason_vuic_book/
The Yugo is known as "The Worst Car in History"

 

The problem is two-fold:
 
Most people think that Lime is lime and/or all pelletized lime is the same.
We know that all lime does not react the same, but many researchers are unaware of this.
 
The second part of this problem is  that when pelletized lime was first made in the 60's and even through today, many pellet lime manufactures take a coarse ag lime (average of 20-30 mesh) and pelletize it. Pelletizing doesn't make a product more effective it just makes it easy to handle. When you pelletized low grade lime you get expensive low grade lime. Couple that with the fact that to pelletize this low grade lime you need lots of lignin and lots of dryer heat to make a pellet and you get concrete balls that don' beak down in the soil. So you get Universities publishing papers that all pellet lime is junk when in reality, the pellet lime they tested was junk.
 
It would be like comparing a small car and big car, but only saying the small care we tested was found that it was not really that reliable. Well which small care did you test, a Toyota or the Yugo? If it was a Yugo we would expect it not to be reliable, if it was a Toyota that would be very surprising since they are known as a quality reliable car. Saying all lime is the same is like saying I tested a car and found it to be unreliable!
 
Update from the Lime Conference
How do we know that all Lime is not the same?
We have told you for years that SuperCal 98G works better than other liming materials, know we have some hard science as to why! It was great to spend a day with the worlds most preeminent scientist in the field of lime stone reactivity.
 
Dr. Grunwaldt, the key note speaker at the lime conference has over 40 years of research in the area of lime reactivity or dissolution.
 
One of his first commercial ventures into the reactivity of limestones was with a commercial Azalea grower. This grower grew millions of dollars of Azaleas every season and as part of preparing his potting soil (a bark substrate with a pH of 4) he would add a 3 shovel fulls of groun
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Ag Lime Conference

 This morining I had to grab a jacket, seed corn harvest is underway, I think fall is here. Once harvest has been completed it will be time to lime!

To kick the fall fertilizer season off right I will be speaking at the Ag-Lime Agronomy Conference in Portland, Oregon on September 16th, on the subjects of how lime works and current ag lime laws.

This event is sponsored by Columbia River Carbonates.

The focus of this event will be the Discussion and Assessment of Lime, specifically how effective are they in agriculutre. As well as:

  • European and U.S. lime regulations and standards.
  • New lime use application in agriculture to increase yield potential
  • New testing methods to evaluate agricultural limes

Keynote Speaker is Dr. Hans-Siegfreid Grunwaldt, Lecturer and researcher in agricultural chemistry and soil at the Univeristy  Applied Sciences Kiel, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.

We are honored to be sharing the stage for this great event.

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

Read more...

Ag Lime Conference

 This morining I had to grab a jacket, seed corn harvest is underway, I think fall is here. Once harvest has been completed it will be time to lime!

To kick the fall fertilizer season off right I will be speaking at the Ag-Lime Agronomy Conference in Portland, Oregon on September 16th, on the subjects of how lime works and current ag lime laws.

This event is sponsored by Columbia River Carbonates.

The focus of this event will be the Discussion and Assessment of Lime, specifically how effective are they in agriculutre. As well as:

  • European and U.S. lime regulations and standards.
  • New lime use application in agriculture to increase yield potential
  • New testing methods to evaluate agricultural limes

Keynote Speaker is Dr. Hans-Siegfreid Grunwaldt, Lecturer and researcher in agricultural chemistry and soil at the Univeristy  Applied Sciences Kiel, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.

We are honored to be sharing the stage for this great event.

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

Read more...
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