Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: August 2010
Calcium Product 98G

title-blogronomist

Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: August 2010

FSF- In a Coon's Age

 

 

IN A COON’S AGE

 

I have been out traveling quite a bit the last two weeks. So have our masked furry friends. Raccoons are currently out looking for their winter homes and that has lead to a lot of dead one on the highway. With all those furry speed bumps in the road, how did “In a coon’s age” get its start? 
 
Meaning: Coon's age is short for raccoon's age, meaning a very long time.
 
Origin: "A coon's age" is an Americanism recorded in 1843 and probably related to the old English expression 'in a crow's age,' meaning the same. "References differ, but a wild individual raccoon might live up to 5 to 7 years (average survival being much lower, though, probably 2-3 years), and in captivity they can live up to 14-17 years. So their lifespan is comparable to that of a dog." In the early 1800s, it's doubtful if anyone knew how long raccoons actually lived, and two to three years in the wild is not really very long. But raccoon fur is hardy and reasonably durable, which might have given rise to the belief of longevity.
 
As you may know, the "coon" came to mean a whole different thing unrelated to expression "in a coon's age." Coon was first a term for a white person from the country, and then it became an insulting term for a black person.
 
"Coon” was originally a short form for raccoon in 1741, then by 1832 meant a frontier rustic, and by 1840 a Whig. The 1834 song 'Zip Coon' (better known today as 'Turkey in the Straw') didn't refer specifically to either a White or a Black and the 'coon songs' of the 1840s and 50s were Whig political songs. By 1862, however, coon had come to mean a Black and this use was made very common by the popular 1896 song 'All Coons Look Alike to Me,' written by Ernest Hogan, a Black who didn't consider the word derogatory at the time." From "I Hear America Talking" by Stuart Berg Flexner (Von Nostrand Reinhold Co., New York, 1976), Page 54.
 
Thanks to political correctness the use of “coon” is now generally considered offensive.  However, if you are inclined not to use a coon's age because you think it refers to African Americans and not raccoons look at the dates and think again. On the other hand, it might be time to come up with a new term for "a long time" since the ones we have are more worn out than a month of Sunday’s!
 
For more info on Raccoons: http://icwdm.org/wildlife/raccoon.asp
 
Sources:
 
Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you hav
Read more...
  • Published in Calcium

Calcium Impacts California Soils

 Patrick McGinnity sent me a great article today on calcium.

It is from www.agalert.com. The most widely read agricultural publication in California, Ag Alert® is published weekly by the California Farm Bureau Federation and distributed as a membership benefit to Farm Bureau members. We publish online the top stories from each edition.

To read the article, click on the following link http://www.calciumproducts.com/articles/agalert_organic_and_calcium.pdf

To subscribe to ag alert, go to http://www.cfbf.com

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

Read more...

Raising Sulfur Levels on a Soils Tests - Update from Iowa State

On Monday one of our customers asked the question, “How much increase of sulfur will I see on my soils report for each pound of sulfur applied?”

This is an interesting question, and unfortunately does not have a direct answer. It depends on many things, soil texture, soil organic matter, soil temperature, soil moisture, drainage, and soil microbiology.

It also depends on the type of sulfur you are measuring. By that I mean are you testing for sulfate, sulfide, or oxides. Most reports only test for the plant available form, the sulfate. This problematic since the sulfate form of S is an anion (negative charge), and therefore is leachable. As a rough rule-of-thumb, it can be considered to leach through the soil profile at about 50% as fast as nitrates (NO3-).
 
Most farmers don’t worry about “building” N on a soils report. Due to its leachablity it is applied every year. As with Nitrogen, Sulfur can be converted into unavailable forms, lost as a gas, or leached in irrigation or rain water. Excess sulfur does not normally present an agronomic problem for crops, but it is need to build soil organic matter.
 
One percent soil organic matter can have 140# of sulfur locked up in it. Microbial action will break this down overtime and make the nutrients in the organic matter available to crops. It takes warm moist soils for microbial conversions, so a winter test of sulfur may not show true growing condition levels.
 
Another consideration is that when drying soils at the lab, this process increase the sulfur number on a soils report. I have a number of questions out to agronomist and soils labs to weigh in on this and will be posting the answers here.
 
Finally, while it is important to build soil levels, it really only means something if it gets into the crop, this study done by FC in Rake Iowa shows a 20% increase in sulfur and a 3x increase in calcium!
 
Update: 
From John Menghini, Midwest Labs In response to sulfur levels increasing during drying of samples. "I am not sure on sulfur specifically and I think it would depend on the method that they are using for the sulfur analysis.  I know that a wet soil when extracted for cations which includes the sulfur for us will be low when the sample is wet.  I have also evaluated soils that were dried at very high temperatures even for a a short time (2 hours at 120 C), we see the sulfur value increase by approximately 20%. It is extremely important when drying soils that the percent of moisture remaining in the sample is minimal (less than 5%) and that the temperature in the drying chamber is not too high to impact the S or any other cations in a negative way."
 
From Joe Thelen, Midwes Labs in response to sulfur increasing on tests.
"There is no good rule of thumb for anions. They are very leachable and will move with moisture in the soil profile.  The timeframe from application to sampling is also an important factor. If sulfur is applied today and we sample next week, there will be a higher value.  If we sample next spring or summer, there is no guarantee.Elemental sulfur will be around longer, but is not as readily available for plant uptake."
 
From Dr. John Sawyer, Extension Soil Fertility Specialist and Professor in Agronomy at Iowa State. "The theory would be that each lb of S/acre would increase soil test by 0.5 ppm, if the applies S is within the 6 2/3 acre furrow slice. That is assuming a sulfate form (assuming the test measures sulfate-S) and no uptak
Read more...

FSF - In a Pickle

 

 

IN A PICKLE

Meaning: In trouble or another mess

Origin:  Not literally meaning inside a cucumber soaked in vinegar, which we now think of as a pickle. In a pickle has a much darker background from the 1400's! 

The earliest pickles were spicy sauces made to accompany meat dishes. Later, in the 16th century, the name pickle was also given to a mixture of spiced, salted vinegar that was used as a preservative. The word comes from the Dutch or Low German pekel, with the meaning of 'something piquant'. Later still, in the 17th century, the vegetables that were preserved, for example cucumbers and gherkins, also came to be called pickles. 

The 'in trouble' meaning of 'in a pickle' was an allusion to being as disoriented and mixed up as the stewed vegetables that made up pickles. This was partway to being a literal allusion, as fanciful stories of the day related to hapless people who found themselves on the menu. The earliest known use of pickle in English contains such an citation. The Morte Arthure, circa 1440, relates the gory imagined ingredients of King Arthur's diet:

He soupes all this sesoun with seuen knaue childre, Choppid in a chargour of chalke-whytt syluer, With pekill & powdyre of precious spycez. 
[He dines all season on seven rascal children, chopped, in a bowl of white silver, with pickle and precious spices]

 

Source: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/in-a-pickle.html

 

Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

Read more...
  • Published in Soybeans

Sudden Death Syndrome

Is Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS) appearing in your soybean fields this year?  If so, you are not alone!  Many producers & dealers have been shocked at the amount of SDS & how rapidly it has evolved this year.

Here is an excellent video from Iowa State Extension discussing SDS & how it affects the entire plant: http://www.ag.iastate.edu/video/v/Sudden_Death_Syndrome_Video

Conclusions: Mother Nature still holds the upper hand in crop development, but management makes a difference too!

Make sure to include SuperCal SO4 as part of your management strategy for next year.  It can offset some of the effects from saturated soils, as well as providing a soluble source of calcium for healthy plants.

 

Read more...
  • Published in Forages

Have You Tested Your Forages Yet?

Have you tested your forages yet?  As our growing season nears completion, & producers get ready for fall, the quality of the forages in livestock's diet declines.  Here is a great resources from Iowa State University Extension on the value in testing your feedstuffs.

http://www.iowabeefcenter.org/Factsheets/Factsheet-stretching-hay-supplies.pdf?utm_source=IBC+Growing+Beef+Newsletter&utm_campaign=887612b4d1-Growing_Beef_Newsletter_September_2010&utm_medium=email

And as you start your preparations for 2011, make sure to include SO4 in your plans!  Having a high quality, soluble source of calcium & sulfur can often improve the quality & quantity of your feed.

Read more...

FSF - Sick as a Dog

SICK AS A DOG 

The past two weeks I have been fighting a terrible computer virus. I think I have it licked (huh.. beaten). To celebrate the return of FSF, I thought sick as a dog was fitting.
 
Meaning: To vomit like a dog
 
Origins: "Sick as a dog," which means "extremely sick" and dates to 1705. Anyone who knows dogs knows that while they can and often will eat absolutely anything. On those occasions when their diet disagrees with them the results can be quite dramatic. And while Americans may consider themselves "sick" when they have a bad cold, in Britain that would be called "feeling ill." "Being sick" in Britain usually means "to vomit."
 
So to really appreciate the original sense of "sick as a dog," imagine yourself seated in the parlor having tea with the Vicar on a lovely Sunday afternoon, when Fido staggers in from a meal of sun-dried woodchuck and expresses his unease all over your heirloom oriental carpet.!
 
 
Sources: http://www.word-detective.com/061202.html http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-sic1.htm
 
 
Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .
 
Read more...

Tissue Testing Values

 

A couple of weeks ago I attended theInternational Ag Labs field day. Dr. Skow had a great presentation on tissue testing soybeans for high yields. Tissue testing is becoming a very hot item. I thought I’d share with you a few high lights from this presentation.
 

Nutrient
Normal
Current Ag Labs Average of tests
Notes
Phosphorus
0.25% - 0.5%
< 0.73%
 
Read more... Subscribe to this RSS feed
Blogronomist

ABOUT OUR BLOGRONOMIST PAGE

Maintained by our team of experts, we have a wide array of blog articles from our experts and guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

  1. Categories
  2. Archives

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007