Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: July 2010
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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: July 2010

FSF - The Bee's Knees

THE BEE'S KNEES

I missed last week's post due to a severe virus on my computer. This weeks post is a reader request, though it didn't originate on the farm, bee's are an integral part of agriculture.

Meaning: "the height of excellence,"

Origin:  A bee's "corbiculae", or pollen-baskets, are located on its tibiae, the mid-segments of its legs or knees. The phrase "the bee's knees," meaning  became popular in the U.S. in the 1920s.

 

Source: http://www.sandiegobeesknees.com/the_bees_knees.htm

There are a couple of other idea on what this means and I can't find who might have said it first. So have you heard another meaning for this saying? Let me know!

 

Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

 

 

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Farm Progress Show

If your looking for something to do next week (Aug 31 -Sept 2) come out to the Farm Progress Show in Boone, IA.

You can find us in booth 9417, which is in the Varied Industries Tent. Bring your soil reports and your questions about soil fertility! We look forward to seeing you there!

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

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FSF - Pleased as Punch

 

 

 

PLEASED AS PUNCH

My grandmother used to say this a lot. As a boy I never really got it, sure drinking red punch made me happy and so did hitting my brother. Well here is the real origins and meanings!

Meaning: Very Satisfied

 

Origin: As pleased as Punch' derives from the Mr. Punch puppet character. Punch's name itself derives from Polichinello (spelled various ways, including Punchinello), a puppet used in the 16th century Italian Commedia dell'arte.
 
Punch and Judy shows, the popular summer-time entertainments on British beaches, have been somewhat in decline from the latter half of the 20th century onward, due to them being seen as politically incorrect. That's hardly surprising as the main character Punch is a wife-beating serial killer.
 
In performance, the grotesque Punch character is depicted as self-satisfied and delighted with his evil deeds and squawking "That's the way to do it!" whenever he dispatches another victim. Nevertheless, there is still what might be called a folk affection for the old rogue in the UK and it would be a shame to see the tradition fade away completely. 
 
The show had an Italian origin and has been much changed over the years. It began in Britain at the time of the restoration of the monarchy in the 17th century. 
 
The phrase 'as pleased as Punch' appears fairly late in the story. The earliest known record is from William Gifford's satires The Baviad, and Maeviad, 1797:  Oh! how my fingers itch to pull thy nose! As pleased as Punch, I'd hold it in my gripe.
 
'As pleased as Punch' is now the most common form of the expression. When the term was coined it was just as usual to say 'as proud as Punch'. Charles Dickens, for example used the two terms interchangeably in his novels. For example:
 
David Copperfield, 1850: I am as proud as Punch to think that I once had the honor of being connected with your family.
 
Hard Times, 1854: When Sissy got into the school here..her father was as pleased as Punch.
 
 
Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig
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Pocahontas County Cover Crop Management 101

From the PFI Listserve


 Pocahontas County Cover Crop Management 101

Pocahontas, IA – Learn how to improve your cover crops at a Practical Farmers of Iowa field day workshop in Pocahontas on Thursday, August 19 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The field day will begin with a complimentary evening meal, followed by a cover crop management discussion.  The event is free and the public is invited to attend.


The cover crop management discussion will include: fitting cover crops into corn and soybeans, aerial-seeding cover crops, cover crops and organic agriculture, grazing cover crops, no-till + manure and cover crops, funding cover crops: EQIP and MRBI, new cover crop species, planting dates, planting rates, killing methods.

Tom Kaspar from the National Laboratory for Ag and the Environment will present about ten years worth of research he and other colleagues have been conducting on cover crops.

Sarah Carlson will share on-farm research results of 2 study PFI farmers have been conducting with cover crops in no-till and organic farming systems. She will also share other farmers’ cover crops stories and share an opportunity for farmers to conduct on-farm research through PFI’s Cooperators Program.

Joe Frerk from NRCS will share information about EQIP and MRBI program funds available to help offset the cost of adding a cover crop to your farming system.

Address: County Conservation, 702 NW 7th St., Pocahontas, IA 50574
Directions: At the corner of highways 3 and 4 travel north on 4 a 1/2 mile to the County
Conservation Board. Buildings are north of the hospital on the east side of the road.
Look for PFI field day signs.

Field Day Contact: Joe Frerk, NRCS and Soil Water Conservation District, (712) 335-4790,joe.frerk@ia.usda.gov

 

Practical Farmers of Iowa includes a diverse group of farmers and nonfarmers. Corn, soybeans, beef cattle, and hay are the top enterprises for PFI farmers, although many have a variety of other operations, including fruits and vegetables. PFI’s programming stresses farmer-to-farmer networking through research and demonstration, field days, conferences, and more. For more information, call (515) 232-5661 or visit www.practicalfarmers.org.

 

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Get the "dirt" on soil

 From the PFI List Serve:

How plants ‘cry wolf’ to fool aphids

(discovery.com) – When aphids attack, plants don't just stand there and take it: They send out a chemical scream for help. And when that help arrives in the form of ladybugs or other aphid predators, the aphids ring their own chemical alarm bell and scatter.

Now researchers have manipulated this system and altered a plant so that it rings the aphid alarm bell all the time -- like the boy who cried wolf. The result are aphids that eventually ignore the alarm and don't scatter, making them very easy pickings for ladybugs.

"It's an arms race between plants and aphids," said Martin De Vos, formerly of the Boyce Thompson Institute in Ithaca, N.Y., and now at the firm Keygene in the Netherlands.

De Vos is the lead author of a paper on the matter in this week's issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

Most aphid species run for it when they detect a pheromone called (E)-ß-farnesene (EBF), which is released by aphids when they are attacked. Some aphid predators home in on that signal as well, sort of like how blood in the water attracts more sharks.

"It's always been on (plant) breeders' minds that maybe they could use this for aphid resistance," De Vos told Discovery News.

This is useful not because aphids themselves are particularly damaging, but because they transmit dangerous plant viruses, De Vos said.

"By raising aphids on plants that were genetically engineered to produce the aphid alarm pheromone, we created 'fearless' aphids that no longer run away," said Georg Jander, a co-author on the paper. "It's a habituation phenomenon similar to being left in a room with a skunk; after a while you don't smell the skunk anymore."

What's more, the habituated aphids actually grow faster than ordinary aphids, likely because they spend less time responding to false alarms, Jander explained. When ladybugs arrive, however, the fearless aphids get eaten more easily because they don't know that they should run away.

"Therefore, engineering plants that produce aphid alarm pheromone might have agricultural applications," Jander told Discovery News.

The researchers also showed that exposure to the alarm pheromone causes gene expression changes in the aphids. In just three generations (not long for aphids, which are born pregnant), aphids were habituated to EBF. Likewise, they lost their "fearlessness" in three generations if raised on non-EBF-producing plants.

"It's really very exciting stuff," commented John Pickett of Rothamsted Research in the U.K. Earlier work had tried exposing aphids to short bursts of EBF, but hadn't gone so far as to discover the effects of habituating the aphids to the alarm. "The fact that there is increased predation of the habituated aphids -- that's really exciting."

Mother Nature has, in fact, already perhaps tested this technique with potato plants.

"Some other plant species, including potato, can produce EBF, and the levels reported vary among (varieties)," said Sanford Eigenbrode, professor and chair of the entomology division at the University of Idaho.

It may even be possible that this could explain why some kinds of potatoes are more susceptible to aphids and others less so.

 

Yield Starts Here

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How plants 'cry wolf' to fool aphids update

 From the PFI List Serve:

How plants ‘cry wolf’ to fool aphids

(discovery.com) – When aphids attack, plants don't just stand there and take it: They send out a chemical scream for help. And when that help arrives in the form of ladybugs or other aphid predators, the aphids ring their own chemical alarm bell and scatter.

Now researchers have manipulated this system and altered a plant so that it rings the aphid alarm bell all the time -- like the boy who cried wolf. The result are aphids that eventually ignore the alarm and don't scatter, making them very easy pickings for ladybugs.

"It's an arms race between plants and aphids," said Martin De Vos, formerly of the Boyce Thompson Institute in Ithaca, N.Y., and now at the firm Keygene in the Netherlands.

De Vos is the lead author of a paper on the matter in this week's issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

Most aphid species run for it when they detect a pheromone called (E)-ß-farnesene (EBF), which is released by aphids when they are attacked. Some aphid predators home in on that signal as well, sort of like how blood in the water attracts more sharks.

"It's always been on (plant) breeders' minds that maybe they could use this for aphid resistance," De Vos told Discovery News.

This is useful not because aphids themselves are particularly damaging, but because they transmit dangerous plant viruses, De Vos said.

"By raising aphids on plants that were genetically engineered to produce the aphid alarm pheromone, we created 'fearless' aphids that no longer run away," said Georg Jander, a co-author on the paper. "It's a habituation phenomenon similar to being left in a room with a skunk; after a while you don't smell the skunk anymore."

What's more, the habituated aphids actually grow faster than ordinary aphids, likely because they spend less time responding to false alarms, Jander explained. When ladybugs arrive, however, the fearless aphids get eaten more easily because they don't know that they should run away.

"Therefore, engineering plants that produce aphid alarm pheromone might have agricultural applications," Jander told Discovery News.

The researchers also showed that exposure to the alarm pheromone causes gene expression changes in the aphids. In just three generations (not long for aphids, which are born pregnant), aphids were habituated to EBF. Likewise, they lost their "fearlessness" in three generations if raised on non-EBF-producing plants.

"It's really very exciting stuff," commented John Pickett of Rothamsted Research in the U.K. Earlier work had tried exposing aphids to short bursts of EBF, but hadn't gone so far as to discover the effects of habituating the aphids to the alarm. "The fact that there is increased predation of the habituated aphids -- that's really exciting."

Mother Nature has, in fact, already perhaps tested this technique with potato plants.

"Some other plant species, including potato, can produce EBF, and the levels reported vary among (varieties)," said Sanford Eigenbrode, professor and chair of the entomology division at the University of Idaho.

It may even be possible that this could explain why some kinds of potatoes are more susceptible to aphids and others less so.

 

Yield Starts Here

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FSF - What in Tarnation

 

 

WHAT IN TARNATION

When your tractor breaks down, you may wonder what in tarnation you did to deserve it!

I first heard this saying from an Uncle while visiting his farm. As I child I didn't know the meaning, maybe I even thought he made it up. Today this wouldn't be considered swearing, but in the past minced oath's were more common.

Meaning: An alteration of darnation, euphemism for damnation

Origins: Dates back to 1790, another source says it has been used in New England since colonial times and it is "a suphemism for damnation! or damn!. The best guess is that it derives from the English 'tarnal!' which itself derives from the mild interjection 'eternal!'" From "Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins" by Robert Hendrickson (Facts on File, New York, 1997).

Minced oaths are a sub-group of euphemisms used to avoid swearing when expressing surprise or annoyance. If you hit your thumb with a hammer when great aunt Edith is in the room what do you say? It's probably going to be a minced oath. They are usually, although not exclusively, religious in nature and date from the days when it wasn't acceptable to use the name of God, Jesus or other religious notables in everyday speech. To mince your words, or mince matters, means to choose words so as not to offend anyone.

Source: http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/59/messages/984.html

Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

 

 

 

 

 

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Please Welcome Patrick McGinnity

Please welcome Patrick McGinnity! We are extremely excited to have Patrick on our team. With 29 years in the green industry as an executive in a variety of field and home office management roles including positions with Nufarm, Nachurs-Alpine, Syngenta Seeds and Ringer Corporation.  
 
Patrick's extensive work in the agricultural industry with a focus on product development, market development and sales management, field evaluation of pesticides and fertilizers and product portfolio management is a great asset to Calcium Products. Having managed field development efforts in a wide range of cropping systems across the Midwest and western U.S. as well as western Canada Patrick can help you understand what products works in your farming operation.
 
In addition to row crop experience Patrick has a broad scope of experience in the turf and ornamental industry in market development and sales management in the U.S. and Canada. With over eleven years of background in retail consumer products for the lawn and garden market.  
 
Patrick started his career in research in development and moved into marketing, operations and general management.  With additional experience in developing distribution, product development, packaging design, and mergers and acquisition activity.  
He received his Ph. D. from the University of Minnesota, graduating with honors in 1981, 
with an emphasis on soil microbiology studying the interaction of Bradyrhizobium strains 
with soybean genotypes.  Earned a Masters of Science from Southern Illinois University in 1978 with an emphasis in soil microbiology researching the impact of the soybean cyst nematode on soybean growth and nitrogen fixation.  While working on M.S. degree he was team member in the herbicide research project at SIU under the direction of Dr. George Kapusta. Patrick did his undergraduate studies at University of Minnesota in Soil Science with a minor in plant physiology.
 
Patrick's main duties will be to serve as point of contact to customers in Eastern Minnesota, Eastern Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois and Eastern Canada. Patrick will also be assisting in testing of our new products, HumaCal and Triplicity, and a other special projects.
 
 
 
 

 

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Maintained by Craig Dick, blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing, we have a wide array of blog articles from Craig and some expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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