Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: June 2010
Calcium Product 98G

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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: June 2010

Off Without A Hitch

 

 
 
GO OFF WITHOUT A HITCH
 
Meaning: to happen successfully without any problems
 
Origin: One of the definitions of hitch actually means a temporary difficulty. This phase is known as an idiom. The earliest publication I could find of it is from Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXII, Issue 2832, 23 August 1866. This saying gains widespread popularity from this point on.
 
I was surprised to find that there are no references to beast of burden running off with parts of their hitches still attached to them or to flint lock rifles mis-firing.
 
It is usually used to refer to weddings that go smoothly.
 
 
Sources: Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary, Cambridge University Press
 
 
Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

 

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Low Boron and Excess Iron, is there an interaction?

 

 

One of our customers emailed in with some questions. They wanted to know about lower pH levels and higher iron levels & potential correlations and were seeing seeing sub Boron and excess irons in tissue samples.

After some research, near as I can tell boron and iron have no interactions. Both are however affected by calcium (See chart 1).

More calcium will reduce iron uptake. Boron and silicon help to increase calcium uptake.

In low pH excess phosphorus can reduce boron uptake

High potassium can reduce boron uptake

Boron deficiency

  • Reduces growth of soil bacteria.
  • Poor movement of sugar and carbohydrates in the plant.
  • Affects timing of maturity, pollination, and reproduction.

Some old articles on boron and silicon:

 

What about Iron?

Injury due to high soil iron concentrations is not common under neutral or high pH soil conditions. Toxic situations occur primarily on acid soils (< pH 5.0) and where excess soluble iron salts have been applied as foliar sprays or soil amendments (poor quality limestone).

The first symptoms of iron toxicity are necrotic spots on the leaves. An unusual form of iron toxicity has been observed in Michigan on organic soils and high organic sands. Some iron-rich, low pH, low manganese soils create an environment in which an interaction between the iron and manganese in the soil reduces manganese uptake by plants. The symptoms observed on the plants are of manganese deficiency, but the low plant uptake of manganese is caused by excessive available iron in the soil.

http://web1.msue.msu.edu/imp/modf1/05209708.html

Toxicity Symptoms

Iron toxicity is primarily pH related and occurs where the soil pH has dropped sufficiently to create an excess of available Iron. (I think this statement is wrong, not low pH, low calcium is the issue cmd)

As with some other nutrients, the visible symptoms of Fe toxicity are likely to be a deficiency of another nutrient. Fe toxicity can also occur when Zinc is deficient, or the soil is in a "reduced" condition caused by very wet or flooded conditions. Excess Fe can result in Dark green foliage, stunted growth of tops and roots, dark brown to purple leaves on some plants (e.g. bronzing disease of rice). http://www.spectrumanalytic.com/support/library/ff/Fe_Basics.htm

High levels of nitrogen and potassium increase iron uptake

Excessive iron can reduce uptake of manganese, additions of sulfur improve uptake of manganese

High iron can reduce zinc uptake, and low zinc uptake is often found with low manganese

Iron excess:

  • Interferes with phosphorus absorption.
  • Requires use of higher levels of potassium to regulate.
  • Can cause Zinc deficiency

To reduce problems with excess iron make sure you have adequate levels of calcium in your soils and the pH is at least 6.5. SupeCal SO4 gypsum and SuperCal 98G limestone are great ways to ensure pro

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FSF - Don't Count Your Chickens

 DON'T COUNT YOUR CHICKENS BEFORE THEY ARE HATCHED

Meaning: 

Don't be hasty in evaluating one's assets.

Origin:

Many of the proverbial words of advice that have lasted the test of time begin with 'don't'. 'Don't count your chickens' is one of the oldest, and possibly the wisest, of these. The thought was recorded in print by Thomas Howell in New Sonnets and pretty Pamphlets, 1570:

Counte not thy Chickens that vnhatched be,
Waye wordes as winde, till thou finde certaintee

 Source: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/count-your-chickens.html

 

 

Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

 

 

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Calcium Products Gives Back

 We love farmers! Without them we would have no customers or food!

This is just one of the many reasons why Calcium Products supports the The American Cancer Society and has made a donation to the Relay for Life campaign.

 

 
Getting ready for the Survivor's Walk

Why Support the American Cancer Society?

According to "Cancer Incidence in the Agricultural Health Study – abstract

The overall cancer occurrence among farmers and their spouses in the Agricultural Health Study (AHS) is significantly less than that expected compared to other men and women of the same age living in Iowa

However --

The risk of prostate cancer is significantly greater among farmers and commercial applicators. Female spouses had a significantly greater frequency of a serious type of skin cancer (i.e., melanoma) and female pesticide applicators had a significantly greater frequency of ovarian cancer.

Thanks to all who helped us have a great year and made it possible to give back to our community!

 

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .
 

 

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FSF - Dog Days

DOG DAYS

Meaning: The hottest, most sultry days of summer..

Origins: This saying has nothing to do with dogs. The expression originated in Roman times as 'canicularius dies,' 'days of the dog,' and was an astronomical expression referring to the dog star Sirius, or possibly Procyon. The Romans linked the rising of the Dog Star, the most brilliant star in the constellation, 'Canis Major,' with the sultry summer heat, believing that the star added to the extreme heat of the sun. 'Canicular days,' of course, have nothing to do with heat from the Dog Star, but the ancient expression remains popular after more than 20 centuries."

From "Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins" by Robert Hendrickson (Facts on File, New York, 1997, http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/10/messages/722.html

 

Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .
 

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FSF - Greedy as a Pig

 GREEDY AS A PIG

I was flipping through the channels last night when this clip from the movie Snatch caught my eye.
 

 
It had me thinking was it true, I know other movies and shows that featured pigs being fed flesh. I know from my own experience working on hog farms they can devour each other rather quickly. But is this really where the saying came from?
 
Meaning: Pigs will eat all put in front of them
 
Origin: As near as I can tell this saying did not originate with how much flesh a pig can eat. It is known as a false proverb, which means, not being a complete sentence and seldom express any general wisdom (Yoruba Proverbs, Oyekan Owomoyela). It has however been with us as long as we have been keeping pigs and refers more generally to the fact that pigs  are someone or something that monopolizes time and resources. 
 
 
 
Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .
 

 

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Top 5 Mistakes in Fertilizer Application

At Calcium Products we read everything we can get our hands on about soil fertility. We talk with anyone who will teach or listen. We would like to introduce you to 5 of those people and in our estimation 5 of the top consultants in the country. 

Gary Zimmer, Midwestern Bio Ag

Neal Kinsey, Kinsey Agricultural Services, Inc

Phil Wheeler, Ph.D. Crop Services International

Mike Amaranthus, Ph.D. Mycorrhizal Applications, Inc.

Jon Frank, International Ag Labs

We have been lucky enough to have had the chance to visit and learn from each of these consultants first hand. Now is your opportunity to learn from them. All five were recently featured in the July 2010 magazine Acres USA in the article titled 

Top 5 Mistakes in Fertilizer Application

Reprinted with permission from Acres U.S.A., P.O. Box 91299, Austin, Texas 78709 (512) 892-4400, Subscriptions: $27/year.  For sample copy of Acres U.S.A. call 1-800-355-5313.  www.acresusa.com

What links these guys together? They have all discovered through their hard work, cooperation with clients and years of on farm testing, the power and importance of calcium in the soil and how it impacts yield. We encourage you to stop by their websites or visit with them at trade shows and field days.

A big thank you to the staff at Acres U.S.A for letting us reprint this article!

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

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Glyphosate & Crop Nutrient Interactions

Glyphosate & crop nutrient interactions have been a topic of conversation during many of my recent visits with agronomists & dealers.  Some articles that discuss this in more detail:

http://www.calciumproducts.com/component/k2/item/524-losing-the-glyphosate-resistant-pigweed-battle-we-can-help-you-get-back-in-the-fight

http://www.calciumproducts.com/component/k2/item/494-controling-3-major-yield-robbers-in-2010

http://www.calciumproducts.com/component/k2/item/481-glyphosate-induced-micronutrient-deficiency

I also found this article by Dr. Don Huber a very good summary of what is going on: http://www.fluidjournal.org/1gsdgfs-S10/S10-A4.pdf

Glen Howell is a contributing writer of Yield Starts Here, a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. Glen is an agronomist & sales representative at Calcium Products. Find additional articles by Glen and other writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/
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  • Published in Corn

Doubling Food Production

You have likely seen several articles about the need for continued increases in food production to meet a growing population.  Dr. Harold Reetz, formerly with the International Plant Nutrition Institute, recently wrote a very good article about the need for new champions to help raise the yield bar.  Please read more here: http://www.fluidjournal.org/article1.php

I have an enormous respect for the farmers & others who have been seen as stretching the yield barrier.  I grew up surrounded by farm magazine articles about fantastic corn yields by Herman Warsaw and Francis Childs.  Recently Kip Cullers has been doing the same with soybeans.  We definitely need to continue striving for more production, but we also need to verify that we grow food that is healthy & nutritious.  Many farmers, agronomists, & consultants are working together to help in this effort, recognizing that there is more to a successful outcome than just the "Big 3" nutrients.

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

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  • Published in Corn

FSF - High as an Elephants Eye

  

 

 

 

 

 

THE CORN IS AS HIGH AS AN ELEPHANTS EYE

Meaning: The corn is really tall

Origin: Originally from lyrics in Rogers and Hammerstein’s song Oh What a Beautiful Morning, from the musical Oklahoma.

So where did “knee high by fourth of July or the addition “by the fourth of July” come from?

From what I can find, back in the days of 40 bushel corn, knee high by the fourth of July was the goal, now you are doing something wrong if it not starting to tassel by July in the southern corn belt.

The addition of “buy the 4th of July” to “High as an Elephants Eye” likely has more to do with it rhyming well than an actual reason.

 

http://kids.niehs.nih.gov/lyrics/ohwhata.htm

Happy Independence Day!

 

 

Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

 

 

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Maintained by Craig Dick, blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing, we have a wide array of blog articles from Craig and some expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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