Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: April 2010
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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: April 2010

FSF - Bought the Farm

 

 

 

BOUGHT THE FARM

 
A salute to our fallen Veterans on Memorial Day Weekend
 
Meaning: To die, particularly in an accident or military action.
 
Origin:  Many think this saying comes from the idea that death benefits paid to one's family, especially from the armed forces, were at one time enough to pay off the mortgage to the home, or farm, for the family the deceased left behind. Or, possibly a cynical reference to a common sentiment held by draftees, expressing the desire to settle down and buy a farm when the war is over.
 
While the origin of this phrase is uncertain. It is 20th century and all the early references to it relate to the US military. The New York Times Magazine, March 1954, had a related phrase, in a glossary of jet pilots' slang:
 
"Bought a plot, had a fatal crash."
 
The Oxford English Dictionary defines “buy” as to suffer some mishap; to get killed; to die;
 
The earliest use of “buy” in this sense dates to 1825, more than a century before the earliest appearance of “buy the farm”.
 
In this sense “the farm” is a slang to reference to a burial plot (i.e. a piece of ground). “Buy a plot” appeared around the time of “buy the farm” meaning the same thing.
 
 
Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .
 

 

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Doubling Potato Yields Takes A Little...

spit??  Sounds more than odd, but that is what researchers at Cornell, University of Goettingen, and National University of Colombia discovered.  They were studying the effects from saliva of the Guatemalan potato moth larvae (Tecia solanivora) had on a commercial potato plant.

Their results included that when the larvae infected fewer than 10% of the tubers, the plant produced marketable yields that weighed 2.5 times more than undamaged plants.  Even when up to 20% of the tubers were infected, yields still doubled.  How about when half of the potatoes were infested?  Yields were equal to plants without infection!

This is something you might want to investigate further http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100527131704.htm

Wonder if any of the crops in the Midwest respond in a similar fashion to invasive pests??

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Is your Nitrogen still there?

With the recent rainfall events, now is a great time to make sure that the nitrogen you applied earlier is still there. 

Jim Fawcett, ISU Extension Agronomist, posted some comments about doing this www.iowafarmertoday.com/blog/?p=732

The Iowa Soybean Association, through their On-Farm Network, has some great information on the impact of spring rainfall on nitrogen.  You can review their 2010 Conference Presentations here http://www.isafarmnet.com/2010OFNConfPresentations/ofnpresentations.html.  Iowa's guide for nitrogen recommendations is http://www.extension.iastate.edu/Publications/PM1714.pdf 

Ohio State University has 5 questions to Help Evaluate Your Nitrogen Loss http://cornandsoybeandigest.com/inputs/fertilizer/five-questions-evaluate-nitrogen-loss-0525/

Remember that plant available sulfur is in the sulfate (SO4)- form, which makes it susceptible to leaching.  Make sure to include some sulfur (like SuperCal SO4) in your sidedress application!

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  • Published in Forages

Testing Soil & Forages

 

Soil testing is a regular practice for many crop producers.  Some livestock operations regularly check feed samples, but why shouldn't both be done?  I have noticed that many cattle producers have never tested their soils or feed, yet still expect maximum efficiency & productivity from their forages. 

I think this article http://cattletoday.com/archive/2002/May/CT205.shtml is a great read for all cattlemen & women.  If we don't have a good handle on what the soils are able to support, and we don't know what the forages are testing, how can we manage?

When I was growing up, there were many local farms with cattle.  Today most of those operations are no longer present, and many of the current producers continue to practice management techniques that have served them well in the past, but not necessarily today.  Soil & forage testing is every bit as valuable to livestock producers, as it is to row crops.

 

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Are you ready to cut hay?

As we approach the midpoint of May, many farmers are preparing to harvest the 1st cutting of this year's hay crop.  I have noticed that a few producers have already begun, and more will get started soon if the weather cooperates!

Dr. Stephen Barnhart, ISU Extension Agronomist, gives some good suggestions on timing the 1st cutting. www.extension.iastate.edu/CropNews/2010/0513barnhart.htm

Matt Digman, University of Wisconsin-Madison, has some tips on making sure your equipment is ready to go.  www.agweb.com/news_printer.aspx?articleID=157317

If you harvest haylage, you may find this helpful in improving your forage quality. www.progressiveforage.com/~proforag/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2797:0409-fg-ensiling-what-to-know-before-you-start-the-pile&catid=89:storage&Itemid=123

Good luck with your hay crop!

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Want to Cut Farm Fuel Expenses, Change Rotations

 From the PFI List Serve:

 

AGRONOMY RESEARCH PUBLISHED IN NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

Matt Liebman, agronomy, and a team of researchers at ISU, have found that a farm can cut its fossil fuel use in half by shifting to a four-year cycle — adding a year of another grain, such as oats, and a year of alfalfa, a legume, to the typical corn-soy rotation. Liebman’s research was published in the May 3 issue of National Geographic News, “Saving Fuel on the Farm by Making Hay.” Liebman’s research has been supported for the Leopold Center for six years, and will continue over the next three years. More: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/05/100503-energy-saving-fuel-with-hay/

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

 

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FSF - Hit the Hay

 
HIT THE HAY
 
Meaning: Go to bed.
 
Origin: The term hay was used in the USA to mean bed since the early 20th century. In 1902, American author George Ade wrote in People You Know:
 
"After Dinner he smoked one Perfecto and then,... he crawled into the Hay at 9.30 P.M."
 
In 1902, mattresses were often sacks stuffed with straw or hay (hence the similar phrase 'hit the sack').
 
 
 
 
Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

 

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Exploding Stars Provide Calcium!

 From The LA Times via http://twitter.com/Teddy_Salad:

Supernova (exploding stars)  rich in calcium!

Scientists say it may explain why there's so much of it in the universe, and in us.

"The total amount [of calcium] we see [in the universe] is quite high," Filippenko said, "more than can be explained with conventional supernovae. This new class could explain the large amount of calcium."

Nearly half of the material expelled from SN 2005E was calcium — five to 10 times as much, in terms of mass, than calcium produced by typical supernovae of any variety, according to the paper co-written by Filippenko. The researchers said that it would take only one or two of these calcium-rich supernovae every 100 years to generate all the calcium present in life on earth.

 

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

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Maintained by Craig Dick, blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing, we have a wide array of blog articles from Craig and some expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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