Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: March 2010
Calcium Product 98G

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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: March 2010

How Soil pH Affects Soil-Applied Herbicides

 

 

Note: This article is intended as a general guide to herbicides and soil pH. It is not a substitute for herbicide labels, nor promotes or discourages the use of any herbicide(s). All herbicides are names are trademarks of their respective manufactures.

 

 
Soil pH can make a big impact on soil-applied herbicides
Low soil pH (<6.2) will cause the triazine herbicides (Atrazine, Sencor) to be bound to the soil. When herbicides are adsorbed they are not effective at controlling weeds since they are not available in the soil solution. This is why pH sensitive herbicides like Atrazine, and Sencor can be used with less risk of crop injury in low pH soils. At low soil pH higher rates are need to control weeds. Crop injury increases when soil pH is higher.
 
When higher rates of herbicides are used in an attempt to get better weed control in low pH soils, herbicide residues in the soil increase. These bound herbicides are released if the soil is over-limed. If ag lime is postponed until just before planting, this release of bound herbicide can have serious detrimental effects on sensitive crops.
 
"Over-liming" Injury
Sometimes there are problems when soils are limed with large amounts of ag lime. Spreading high rates of lime than required or quickly raising a very acidic soil can cause crop injury. If there is a long history of triazine herbicides used, liming can release these chemicals and kill sensitive crops. Decreased crop growth because of "over-liming" injury is usually associated with lowered availability of phosphorus, potassium, or boron. Over-liming acidic sandy soils can produce zinc and copper deficiencies.
 
Poor crop performance due to nutrient deficiency is often blamed on Atrazine, and Sencor since problems do not develop until 2 to 3 weeks after emergence. Moldboard plowing can reduces phytotoxicity of Atrazine, and Sencor by diluting the herbicide residue in a large volume of soil. The best way to avoid these problems is to consistently maintain the soil pH above 6.2. Applying SuperCal 98G minimizes the adsorption of triazine herbicides to the soil and results in improved crop safety and performance. Properly limed fields will reduce the residual herbicide in the soil and avoid large release of bound herbicide causing crop injury.
 
Poor Performance and Carry-over
The half-life of many herbicides varies with soil characteristics and environment. For example, the half-life of atrazine in Georgia on a soil with a pH of 6.8 was reported to be 39 days, whereas in Minnesota the half-life was 261 days on a soil with a 7.9 pH. Whether a herbicide has basic, acidic or neutral properties can determine its ability to exist in the soil solution or adsorbed by soil solids. In general, herbicides whose pH is close to the pH of the soil are strongly adsorbed and are not subject t
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FSF - April Showers

 

APRIL SHOWERS BRING MAY SHOWERS

Meaning: Something good may happen as a result of unpleasant events. Many of life’s greatest things come only to those who wait, and by patiently and happily enduring the clouds and damp of April you can find yourself more easily able to take in the sights and smells of May.
 
Origin: The proverb has been traced back to about 1557 in a Poem by Thomas Tusser, A Hundred Good Points of Husbandry, April Husbandry.
Sweet April showers
Do spring May flowers


From "Random House Dictionary of Popular Proverbs and Sayings" by Gregory Y. Titelman (Random House, New York, 1996).
 
 
Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

 

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Microbes Important to the Ocean - What About Your Soil?

"

I stumbled onto an article today, Mat of microbes the size of Greece discovered on seafloor.

Here are some of the things I found interesting.

  • microbes, which constitute 50 to 90 percent of the oceans' total biomass,
  • A single liter of seawater, once thought to contain about 100,000 microbes, can actually hold more than one billion microorganisms
  • Despite their small individual size, microbes play a big role in the oceans and the planet overall. Microbes help to turn atmospheric carbon dioxide into usable carbon, completing about 95 percent of all respiration in the Earth's oceans. Even those deep in the seafloor, such as the deep sea  burrowers, "help oxygenate sediments and interact with microbes to cycle nutrients and carbon on the ocean floor," Arbizu said.

Makes you wonder what is going on in your soil. Many of us have experience feed and caring for cattle and pigs, but whens the last time you feed or take care to manage your soil microbes?

Have you ever thought of them at all?

 

"
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It's Raining Cats and Dogs

  

 

IT'S RAINING CATS AND DOGS

This is a reader request, Thanks for submission Gudrun, a Calcium Products pocket knife is on its way to you. This idiom however did not orginate on the farm...

Meaning: Raining very heavily

Origin:  The expression first appeared in print in a modified form in 1653. Richard Brome's comedy 'The City Wit or The Woman Wears the Breeches', referred to stormy weather with the line: "It shall raine.....dogs and polecats".

The origin seems to stem from the filthy streets of 17th/18th century England. Heavy rain would occasionally carry along dead animals and other debris. The animals didn't fall from the sky, but the sight of dead cats and dogs floating by in storms could well have caused the coining of this colorful phrase. Jonathan Swift described such an event in his satirical poem 'A Description of a City Shower', first published in the 1710 collection of the Tatler magazine.

             Sweeping from butchers’ stalls, dung, guts, and blood;
             Drown’d puppies, stinking sprats, all drench’d in mud,
             Dead cats, and turnip-tops, come tumbling down the flood

The first appearance of the currently used version (Its Raining Cats and Dogs) is in Jonathan Swift’s 'A Complete Collection of Polite and Ingenious Conversation' writen in 1738: “… though he was sure it would rain cats and dogs".
 
The fact that Swift had alluded to the streets flowing with dead cats and dogs some years earlier and now used 'rain cats and dogs' is good evidence that poor sanitation was the source of the phrase as we now use and that Swift my be quoting an expression he himself had created.
 
 
 
 
 
Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a
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FSF - Sow Your Wild Oats

 

 

SOW YOUR WILD OATS

Meaning:  'to conduct oneself foolishly' It usually refers to a young man frittering his time away in fruitless dissipation, or to the prolific sexual activities of a young man.

Origin: The wild oat (Avena fatua) is a common tall plant that looks like its relative the cereal plant oat, but is really a pernicious weed that infests the fields and is difficult to eradicate.

Farmers have since ancient times hated it because it’s a weed that’s useless as a cereal crop, but its seeds have always been difficult to separate from those of useful cereals and so tended to survive and multiply from year to year. The only way to remove it was to tramp the fields and hand-weed it. Even today it’s still a problem, despite modern seed cleaning and selective weedkillers.

The uselessness of wild oats has been known since ancient times and for almost as long we have had the expression to 'sow wild oats, The expression has been traced back to the Roman comic Plautus in 194 B.C. and was probably used before him. The saying is first recorded in English in 1542, in a tract by the Norfolk Protestant clergyman Thomas Becon. In the 16th and 17th century dissolute or wild young men were called 'wild oats." From Little Women by Louisa May Alcott, of 1869: “Boys will be boys, young men must sow their wild oats, and women must not expect miracles”.

 

Sources:

From "Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins" by Robert Hendrickson (Facts on File, New York, 1997)

World Wide Words is copyright © Michael Quinion,

 

Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .
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Blood From a Turnip

YOU CAN’T SQUEEZE BLOOD FROM A TURNIP

Meaning: You cannot get something from a person, especially money, that they don't have. You can only get what people are willing or able to give. A turnip cannot be coaxed, squeezed, or cajoled into producing blood. All efforts at obtaining blood from this vegetable will be futile

Origin:  Unknown, but thought to originate in the Bible, with the story about Cain and Abel in Genesis 4? "Abel kept flocks (a shepherd/rancher), and Cain worked the soil (a farmer). In the course of time Cain brought some of the fruits of the soil as an offering to the Lord. But Abel brought fat portions from some of the firstborn of his flock (a meat offering requiring bloodshed). The Lord looked with favor on Abel and his offering, but on Cain and his offering he did not look with favor." (NIV)

In the Old Testament God required a blood offering for sin. Hence, you can't get blood out of a turnip

Another reference says "blood from a turnip" was used by Frederick Marryat, "apparently borrowing an expression from folklore," in "Japhet in Search of a Father" in 1836: There's no getting blood out of a turnip."
 

 

Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .
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Out of Product?!?!

Yes the rumors are true, we are only able to fill prepay orders as of last Thursday. We will work in other orders as possible. Please call us if you have any questions 800-255-8196.

Being on allocation this early has raised many questions;

  • What happened to all the product?
  • I thought you expanded the plant?
  • What are good long time customers supposed to do?
  • I was not told to prepay or told it shouldn't be necessary.

All are valid questions and concerns. What happened to all the product is that there was virtually no product applied all winter,  this backed up everything. Once spring turned, it was nice from Kansas to Canada, our dealers who have a tremendous capacity for application emptied out stocks in a matter of days. Typically spring starts in the south and by the time the southern half of the county is finishing up, the northern half is just starting. I have talked with many other suppliers and many other terminals were also quickly depleted.

We have been expanding out plants for 5 years strait now. We have increased capacity for production as well as storage, this has just been one of those springs that many input producers could not have predicted. A bad winter with an early unseasonably nice spring, little in country storage combined to empty our warehouse at record pace.

We are disappointed that we are not able to have enough product for everyone this spring. We have many long time customers that are not able to get product. We are working hour-by-hour, day-by-day to get product to prepaid customers first, then customers that have had orders placed since 4-8-10. With rain predicted to hit most of the Midwest this week, we will work get tons to those that can run.

Many dealers may not have been asked to prepay, this is our fault, and we will work to let every dealer know of future programs. You can also ask your product rep or call our offices for more information. For those that were told prepay shouldn't be necessary, again we would like to apologize for that, the information at the time showed that production and storage should have been able to meet demand. In the future our sales staff will work more closely with dealers to ensure needs are meet.

So what else is Calcium Products doing to avoid this for the future?

We are revamping our production schedules, prepay and pricing program, expanding the cost share program to help dealers build more storage and looking at other storage solutions. I know this doesn't make more product available this spring, but we are committed to meeting our customers demands.

We ask for your patience and understanding this spring and thank you for your business and support.

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Grind to a Halt

GRIND TO A HALT

This spring product has gone out faster than previous years. Now that fertilizer stocks are depleted, many dealers have found themselves, grinding to a halt.

Meaning: Probably just a colloquial phrase that refers to something slowing down and stopping, usually because of a problem

Origin: Thought to be an expression used in milling, though use of this saying in print did not show up until Dec. 1934 inThe Nevada State Journal, long after the milling industries hay day.

Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

 

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Huma-what?

We are always looking for new products and ideas to help farmers increase yields, quality and sustain the soil. We think humates and humic acid products are something you should look at.

For more on what humates are.

Here is a short list of Humate Benefits:

  • Improved Water Retention, and water holding capacity
  • Humates can hold up to 20 times their weight in water. 
  • Humic substances can enhance the release of fixed K from montmorillonite soils.
  • Addition of humic acids can increase P uptake by 25%.
  • Humic substances will increase length, and number of lateral roots, seedling growth after germination, nutrient availability and nutrient uptake.
  • These substances also affect a wide range of enzymatic processes
This fall we will have a high quality humate product available, HumaCal.
 

HumaCal is a uniquely synergistic pelletized humate product made with calcium and sulfur. It naturally and effectively provides nutrients, chelating agents, buffering properties and biological stimulation to soil. HumaCal improves plant uptake of soil nutrients, stabilizes nitrogen, stimulates root growth and mass, and increases soil water holding capacity in various agricultural, turf and ornamental applications.

 

HumaCal’s unique pelletizing process allows clean, virtually dust free applications. These all-natural products are NOP approved and OMRI listed. HumaCal is non-toxic and non-corrosive.

 

HumaCal can be applied alone or blended with other fertilizers. HumaCal pellets are tightly screened for accurate blending with other fertilizer ingredients and precision application with any dry fertilizer spreader. HumaCal is recommended as part of a regular soil fertility regime and may be applied anytime, even at planting.

 

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Maintained by Craig Dick, blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing, we have a wide array of blog articles from Craig and some expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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