Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: February 2010
Calcium Product 98G

title-blogronomist

Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: February 2010

7 Sundays of Rain?


It has finally dried out enough that trucks are starting to roll out of here and our farmer customers and dealers are getting some work done. Spring is finally here! While conditions are great now, I was reminded by a farmer in Nebraska about another weather folk saying.

“If it rains on Easter Sunday, it will rain every Sunday for 7 weeks.” He actually heard it from me last year, I had heard it on the radio. We tracked the weather and it rained on Easter last year and we say 6 Sunday’s of rain.

So with rain in the predictions for this weekend what does that mean?

Well it might rain and it might not. According to Keloland.com The last three times it rained on Easter came in 2001, 2003 and 2006. Each of those years, it rained on Easter but did not rain on the following Sundays. Still, it did rain four out of the next seven Sundays.

If this weather story is like others (fog days), it is rooted in a long tradition of our ancestors observing what is going on and taking good records. Something we don’t tend to do as well at these days. It’s good to be aware of things like this so you’re not surprised when the weather doesn’t cooperate.

If it rains or it doesn’t, don’t let it ruin your year, you can’t change the weather anyway!

Enjoy the weekend with friends and family and take some time this growing season to lean on the pick-up and just watch your corn grow, you might observe something you had not seen scouting through 2-50 vision!

Just for fun here are some other Easter weather sayings.

“Rain on Good Friday is “raining on a rock,” according to weather lore, meaning a dry growing season.”

“A white Christmas will bring a green Easter and a green Christmas will bring a white Easter.”

 
A fun website that disscuss some Easter history and traditions
 
 

Read more...

Beat the tar out of...

BEAT THE TAR OUT OF YOU

This was something I heard from my grandmother a lot as a small boy, especially after I disappeared for hours on my bike or on a long hike without letting her know I was going to be gone!

Meaning: As mostly attributed, to defeat someone very badly. As I believe my grandmother meant it, beating them sufficiently to return them to the path of rightousness.
 

Orgin:  It started as an old sea phrase, to "squeeze all the tar out of the ropes" or sails as to hold on tightly, for life. It has been attributed to Herman Melville around 1850.

“I will wallop the tar out of you” appeared around 1888.

As for 'beating the tar out of' --- consider the tar in 'tarpaulin', a canvas cloth that has been stiffened and tightened by soaking in and absorbing tar. Next consider a beating so bad that it takes the 'stiffening' out of a fellow. There you have a sufficient explanation of the phrase. What's more, sticky substances --- blod, snot, sweat, salt, and grime --- may fly from the recipient of such a beating. So the analogy, though now just a dull cliche, was in the first place a vivid, true, and brutal picture.

I did find one religious reference, though I have not been able to substaiate this. "Tar" in this sense is a diminutive of "tarnation," which is a condensation of "eternal damnation," so when you beat the tar out of someone, you are essentially beating them sufficiently to return them to the path of rightousness.
 

source:http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/56/messages/734.html

 

 

Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

Read more...

Calcium for White Mold

There have been tests conducted that show SuperCal SO4 reduces the impacts of white mold. There are also well known University of Wisconsin plant pathologists that will attest (off the record) to gypsum's ability to reduce white mold.

Fertilizer and pesticide labeling laws will not allow us to say that SuperCal SO4 reduces white mold, since this would constitute a pesticide claim.

To find out more on White Mold and how calcium (a nutrient found in SuperCal SO4) improves plant health and defends the plant from white mold click here.

 

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

Read more...
  • Published in Corn

Teaching corn how to fix its own nitrogen?

The importance of nitrogen to profitable corn production has been widely recognized for many years.  Since corn is a grass crop, additional nitrogen is often added to increase yields & profitability.  However, excessive nitrogen application is very expensive-both in terms of cost & environmental impact.  Dr. Kaustubh Bhalerao, agricultural engineer at the U of Illinois, believes that it is possible to "teach" corn how to fix its own nitrogen, through the use of synthetic biology.

Synthetic biology is a new area of research that combines science and engineering in order to design and build or "synthesize" novel biological functions and systems. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synthetic_biology). 

Dr. Bhalerao is looking at how to design a system that enable nitrogen fixing bacteria to communicate with the root systems of corn plants.  Article link: http://www.illinoisagconnection.com/story-state.php?Id=191

I believe this possibility has enormous potential consequences.  What do you think?

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

Read more...

Dirt Poor

 

 
DIRT POOR
 
 
Meaning: Lacking most of the necessities of life, Having, or being able to provide, very few of the basic needs of life; very poor
 
Origin: This phrase first appears in print from Edna Ferber's 1931 novel, American Beauty. Thousands of Great Plains farmers during the Dust Bowl Era lost everything except the dirt of their unworkable farms, now worthless. Also, huge dust storms created an unusual amount of dirtiness by blowing sand into every corner of their farmhouses.
 
Some people say it dates back to England in the 1500's where finished floors were rare, but this origin has not been proven. However dirt as a synonym for soil is an American invention. The English generally use the word to mean filth—either real or metaphorical. Dirt farmer, dirt road, hit pay dirt, eat dirt, and do someone dirt were all coined in the United States.
 
Source: http://www.vintage-vocabulary.com/dirtpoor.html
 
 
 
 
Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .
Read more...
  • Published in Corn

2009 Iowa State Sulfur Trials

Summary of Sulfur Strip Trials Conducted in Central and Northeast Iowa

Preliminary 2009 Results
Click on the heading above for the whole paper.

Report extract:

Last fall Sulfur (S) strip trials were conducted by John Sawyer, Professor; Daniel Barker, Assistant Scientist; ISU Extension Field Agronomists Brian Lang, George Cummins, and Mark Wuebker. The product was aplied by Heartland Co-op, Innovative Ag Solutions, and Five Star Co-op.  Calcium Products, Inc. provided the SuperCal SO4 gypsum used in the central Iowa trials with Heartland Co-op.

RESULTS

Six of the ten field sites had a corn yield increase from the S application (Table 1).  The other four sites had no yield difference with or without S application.  This is a 60% response rate to S application, which is similar to other recent small plot research conducted in north central to northeast Iowa on S response in corn.  For the six responding sites, the average yield increase from S application was 9 bu/acre, with a range of 5 to 13 bu/acre.  These yield increases are large enough to more than pay for a S application (for corn, suggested rates are 15 lb S/acre for fine-textured soils and 25 lb S/acre for coarse-textured soils).

This initial strip trial work indicates that S deficiency is occurring across a wide geographic area of iowa from central to northeast Iowa, and at a frequency that justifies continued research on S fertilization and deficiency identification across Iowa corn and soybean production.


Calcium Products would like to thank everyone involved, especially the farmer cooperators!

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

Read more...

Plants can make their own Aspirin to fight off pathogens

I read everything I can get my hands on about plant health, I found this article on Clean Air Gardening.

 
It sounds like a weird idea, but recent research suggests that the old adage “take two aspirin and call me in the morning” works just as well for plants as it does for us. Not only does aspirin appear to speed germination, it seems that it can also boost a plant’s immune system, helping it resist the onset of fungal and bacterial diseases. This may also be why adding an aspirin to a vase of cut flowers helps them stay perky longer: the aspirin fights microbes that would otherwise enter through the cut ends.
 
 
It turns out that most plants naturally start synthesizing salicylic acid, the active ingredient in aspirin, when under stress. Sometimes, though, they don’t make enough to help in time, and as a result they fall prey to disease. That’s why a couple of aspirin occasionally can help an ailing plant. But don’t overdo it: 1.5 uncoated aspirins tablets in two gallons of water are sufficient. You should add a few teaspoons of liquid soap to the mix to help it stick to the plants, and apply it as a foliar spray every three weeks or so.
 
 
What is Salicylic Acid?
 
Salicylic acid (SA) is a phenolic phytohormone and is found in plants with roles in plant growth and development, photosynthesis, transpiration, ion uptake and transport. SA also induces specific changes in leaf anatomy and chloroplast structure. SA is involved in endogenous signaling, mediating in plant defense against pathogens.[3] It plays a role in the resistance to pathogens by inducing the production of pathogenesis-related proteins.[4] It is involved in the systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in which a pathogenic attack on one part of the plant induces resistance in other parts. The signal can also move to nearby plants by salicyclic acid being converted to the volatile ester, methyl salicylate.[5]
 
Salicylic acid is biosynthesized from the amino acid phenylalanine.
 
 
 
Sulfur is a building block of amino acids. To ensure your plants are as healthy as possible make sure you are providing them a good source of sulfur like SuperCal SO4.
 
Other Related Artilces:
 
Read more...

Congratulations on 100 Years!

 I attended a program on Tuesday hosted by F J Krob & Company (http://www.fjkrob.com/) in recognition of their 100th year in business.  It was a great program, & the room was packed with farmers wanting to stay informed about the fertilizer industry.

David Delaney, President of PCS (Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan) Sales, was the 1st speaker.  Some of his comments:

  • Proper soil nutrition will be required to increase food production to match population growth.
  • Low yields in developing countries reflect unbalanced fertility.
  • Fertilizer will play a critical role in sustaining productivity of soils.

The second speaker was Dr. Kim Polizotto, Chief Agronomist for PCS.  He noted the short term effects of underfertilization.  They include:

  • Yield Loss
  • High crop moisture content at harvest
  • Stalk/stem strength
  • Disease reactions
  • Crop quality, particularly in hay & pasture, cotton

He also discussed that Phosphorus (P) & Potassium (K) fertilization rates have not increased at the same rate as crop yields since 1980.

Questions from the crowd included concern about China's growing presence in the world demand picture, particularly with regard to their impact on fertilizer demand.  One question involved the possibility of China buying PCS.  Mr. Delaney's opinion was that the Canadian government would likely be very concerned about foreign ownership of their company.

I thought both speakers were very good & informative.  However, both speakers referred to balanced fertility only in regards to N-P-K.  I think that this is a common theory in the fertilizer industry, but one that I highly disagree with.  There are many more nutrients than just 3 involved in crop production ( http://blog.calciumproducts.com/posts/proper-nutrients-are-key-for-proper-maturity-and-disease-management.cfm).

 

Congratulations to F J Krob & best wishes for another 100 years in business!

 

 

 

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed
Blogronomist

ABOUT OUR BLOGRONOMIST PAGE

Maintained by Craig Dick, blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing, we have a wide array of blog articles from Craig and some expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

  1. Categories
  2. Archives

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007