Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: January 2010
Calcium Product 98G

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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: January 2010

Stop Skunk Smell

Just relaxing on the couch watching a show about Skunks on Nature. If you have a dog it likely has been sprayed or maybe you have. We have friends with two labs that were always chasing down skunks then getting locked up until the smell went away. With spring just around the corner I think you'll find this information very helpful.

Well according to this show Dr. William Wood of Humboldt State University has unlocked what makes skunk spray smell so bad. More importantly he has a very simple recipe for breaking down these thiols.

For pets that have been sprayed, bathe the animal in a mixture of 1 quart of 3% hydrogen peroxide (from drug store), 1/4 cup of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) and a teaspoon of liquid detergent. After 5 minutes rinse the animal with water. Repeat if necessary. The mixture must be used after mixing and will not work if it is stored for any length of time. DO NOT STORE IN A CLOSED CONTAINER - it releases oxygen gas so it could break the container. This mixture may bleach the pet's hair. Becareful not to get in your pets eyes.

Tomato juice does not work.

Bathing an animal in tomato juice seems to work because at high doses of skunk spray the human nose quits smelling the odor (olfactory fatigue). When this happens, the odor of tomato juice can easily be detected. A person suffering olfactory fatigue to skunk spray will swear that the skunk odor is gone and was neutralized by the tomato juice. Another person coming on the scene at this point will readily confirm that the skunk spray has not been neutralized by the tomato juice.

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

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Don't Muzzle the Ox

DON’T MUZZLE THE OX WHILE HE’S FEEDING

 

I originally thought this saying was “Don’t muscle the ox while he is feeding”. I found out I was wrong, I also found out this is not a farm saying but a biblical saying and was orgnially “YOU SHALL NOT MUZZLE THE OX WHILE HE IS THRESHING ”

 

Meaning: In ancient times an animal was used to spin a wheel or walk a threshing floor to separate the wheat from the stalk/chaff.  Those who were first to harness animal power to thresh wheat quickly discovered that their “power source” was eating the grain they were harvesting.  Animal owners quickly began to muzzle the ox/donkey to keep it from eating the grain.  In the old testament Law God commanded Israel to permit the animal doing the labor to share in the benefits of his hard work. It is designed to teach us that those working hard to produce, ought rightly to share in the benefits of their production. 

 

Origin: The Bible, Paul said in his letter to the Corinthians:  “For it is written in the Law of Moses, “YOU SHALL NOT MUZZLE THE OX WHILE HE IS THRESHING ”

From: http://dollarsanddoctrine.com/2010/01/04/what-does-muzzle-the-ox-mean/

 

Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

 

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  • Published in Calcium

Glyphosate Induced Micronutrient Deficiency

There has been much talk this winter of Dr. Don Huber’s work on glyphosate induced micronutrient deficiency of crops. His work is even featured in this month’s issue of No-Till Magazine (Are We Shooting Ourselves In The Foot With A Silver Bullet?).

What is all the talk about and what does a farmer and an agronomist need to know? 

I have distilled a 12 page a paper down to 3 paragraphs but highly encourage all to read the whole thing.
 
From:
AG CHEMICAL AND CROP NUTRIENT INTERACTIONS – CURRENT UPDATE
 
Micronutrient deficiency symptoms are often indistinct (“hidden hunger”) and commonly ascribed to other causes such as drought, extreme temperatures, soil pH, etc. The sporadic nature of distinct visual symptoms, except under severe deficiency conditions, has resulted in a reluctance of many producers to remediate micronutrient deficiency. Lost yield, reduced quality, and increased disease are the unfortunate consequences of untreated micronutrient deficiency.
 
Glyphosate (N-(phosphomonomethyl)glycine) is a strong metal chelator and was first patented as such by Stauffer Chemical Co. in 1964 (U.S. Patent No. 3,160,632). Metal chelators are used extensively in agriculture to increase solubility or uptake of essential micronutrients that are essential for plant physiological processes. They are also used as herbicides and other biocides (nitrification inhibitors, fungicides, plant growth regulators, etc.) where they immobilize specific metal co-factors (Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Zn) essential for enzyme activity.
 
Gypsum applied in the seed row has shown some promise for detoxifying glyphosate from root exudates since Ca is a good chelator with glyphosate (one of the reasons that ammonium sulfate is recommended in spray solutions with hard water is to prevent chelation with Ca and Mg which would inhibit herbicidal activity). Although bioremediation of accumulating glyphosate in soil may be possible in the future, initial degradation products of glyphosate are toxic to both RR and non-RR plants.
 
Read the whole thing here
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New research: synthetic nitrogen destroys soil carbon, undermines soil health

Calcium Products is a member of Practical Farmers of Iowa, as such I get email updates, I must say I was kind of astounded to see this one (below).

We have known for years that SuperCal SO4 and SuperCal 98G can help reduce the amount of nitrogen it takes to grow a crop, I just didn't know that reducing applied N in addition to saving the farmer money would help his soils be more profitable long term, increase nutrient holding capacity and reduce erosion and runoff.

I know, we have all thought that we need nitrogen to grow a bumper crop, what if you could grow 200+ corn with almost no nitrogen? We know people that can! WIll every farmer be able to go to a no nitrogen program over night? Likely not, but soil improvement, maintenance and management should be to priority for anyone involved in eating. Yes I said eating, if you like food you need a farmer and he needs good quality soil to grow our food!

I will be doing future blogs on the importance on soil carbon. Here are some links to previous articles;

 
 
Update - I have pulled the original article while good information I think the two scientific journals were written from are much more valulable and less sensational.
 
Update II - I have disucused this topic with Dr. Ray Ward of Ward Laboratory on many occasions, here is his response to my question about this article.
Craig:  I have been following this feud for a while.  Funny they never mention yields or the amount of N they are removing from the land every year.  Just fertilizer N is bad.  I talk to farmers about building organic matter or sequestering carbon.  Organic matter has all of the plant nutrients in it.  To sequester carbon you have to sequester all of the plant nutrients.  If you are using the nutrient out of organic matter you are not going to build organic matter.  Illinois has been recommending too much N for corn and Mulvaney is out to prove they have been using too much N.  I remember when Dr. Fred Welsch from Illinois reported that they did not get any corn yield response to N and he could not figure out why.  They had no nitrate tests or anything to explain why.  He was puzzled.  So they continued to recommend too much N and now they have this argument going on.  Dr. Fred Below (Illinois) is recommending 0.85 lb of N per bushel.  This has dropped from 1.2 that Dr. Bob Hoeft (Illinois) was using.  Paul Jasa, at UN-L has increased carbon in his no-till  plots by 10 ton per acre (6 foot depth) in 24 years of no-till with adequate fertility.  No-till was compared to moldboard  plow.  We are trying to encourage farmers to diversify their crop rotations so the microbes diversify.  This will increase organic matter in the soil.  Of course this is in no-till.  Tillage will continue to add oxygen to the soil to increase organic matter “burn”.  No different than the wind coming up when you start a fire.  Oxygen is needed
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Soils in Minnesota Respond to Gypsum

From the February, 19th issue of Changing Agronomy by Midwest Independent Soil Samplers.

"The (basic) soils in our region have a clay base and a common pH range of 7.0-8.2. Different clay types will determine a soils surface area, and likewise, soil-type dictates a soils cation exchange capacity. These physical properties (soil particle size) can directly impact the nutrient variability we experience in southern MN as compared to other parts of the north central region. The more sodic soils experience swelling and/or low permeability. Gypsum applications are often used to help amend these soils by exchanging sodium with calcium to enhanceleaching through the soil profile."

Our friends at CPS in East Chain and FC in Rake have for years been showing farmers that soils in this region will respond and are getting great results with SuperCal SO4.
 

Thanks to Paul for sending this our way!

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

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Mess with the Bull...

MESS WITH THE BULL YOU GET THE HORNS

Meaning: If you do something stupid or dangerous, you can get hurt.

Origin: While not an actual farm saying (Aphorisms), “The horns” is an idiom made famous in the 1985 John Hughes movie “The Breakfast Club. The line comes from the late Paul Gleason who plays the principal. 

This one was suggested to me by one of our blog readers. My college roomate used to say this all the time and I have seen “The Breakfast Club” a couple of times, I hadn’t realized that this was a realtively new expression.
 

 

Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

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Follow Your Nose

Follow Your Nose

No Toucan Sam didn't orginally say it, but he did help to make it a house hold saying.

Meaning: To make decisions by thinking of how you feel about someone or something instead of finding out information about them, to go straight ahead, the direction that one's nose is pointing, to move in the direction of something you smell.

Origin: First seen in print 1774 in “FOUR YEARS ON THE FIRING LINE", By Col. James Cooper Nisbet.

The saying "Even a blind pig finds an acorn every once in a while", gets it roots from follow your nose.

 

Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

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  • Published in Calcium

Farm Journal Article on Soil

Farm Journal now reports what we have been saying for years:

"Adding calcium causes clay particles to “flocculate”—that is, particles are held together but also held apart. The flocculation process also requires organic matter and pectin, which is secreted by microbes found around plant roots, especially grasses. "
 

See the whole article here http://www.agweb.com/FarmJournal/current/Article.aspx?id=155709

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

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Stubby Ears Got Your Yield Down....

"

Paul Helland, one our good friends at FC, in Rake Iowa sent us some interesting information. First off, Paul and his staff are tireless when it comes to putting in demonstration plots, walking fields and observing crop growth.

It's this observation of the crops that lead Paul to wonder why some ears in a row were stubby and some were not. Paul took samples of the ears and sent them to the lab.

Component
As Sent Small Ears
As Sent Large Ears
Dry Wt.Small Ears
Dry Wt.Large Ears
Moisture (%)
8.70
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Beer, Sugar and Snow

A few weeks back we discussed the importance of silicon in crop production. A recent study by Researchers from the Department of Food Science & Technology at the University of California, Davis has found that that beer is a rich source of dietary silicon. So go ahead and pop a cold one after a long day, not only have you earned it, but it has health benefits too.

Beer could also make a good silicon fertilizer as the silicon is in the soluble form of orthosilicic acid (OSA). However you would need 267 cans to equal a pound of applied silicon! A rather expensive fertilizer.

I have heard old-timers say for a healthy lawn pour a beer on it, could silicon be the reason?

Do to problems of links going bad, I have converted the online article to a PDF and saved it on our servers. You can find the article on the study here, http://www.calciumproducts.com/silicon_in_beer.pdf

In an unrelated study, researchers at Johns Hopkins have found that sugar has a more important role in cell division in humans than previously thought. This is very interesting to me since at many of this winter's meeting many farmers have asked questions about adding sugar to their sprays and fertilizers.

We were always told by people doing this practice that it stimulates plant growth and soil biological organisms. The reason stated is it a food source for both. Maybe it is stimulating cell division in plants and microorganism as well?

For the same reason as above the web-page on the sugar study can be found here
http://www.calciumproducts.com/sugar_and_cell_division.pdf

And snow, as my friend Michael has said, "snow" is becoming a four letter word. I think I pulled my back shoveling last nights 6 inches. While I am getting sick of the snow, and driving this morning was a little treacherous, the fence lines and farm yards were really beautiful (next time I'll take a picture)! The days are also getting longer and spring will be here in no time!

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at

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Maintained by Craig Dick, blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing, we have a wide array of blog articles from Craig and some expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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