Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: December 2009
Calcium Product 98G

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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: December 2009

Even A Blind Pig....

Or Agriculture Aphorisms.

EVEN A BLIND PIG FINDS AND ACRON ONCE IN A WHILE

I heard this saying by a speaker at a conference a few weeks back, but under closer inspection, I found out that is should be,  A blind squirrel finds an acorn, a blind pig finds a truffle, once in a while.

Meaning: Most people think that it means that no matter how much of an underdog someone is, and no matter how unlikely it is that they succeed, they will find success. The problem with that is, a pig doesn't search for truffles by vision, but by smell, so a blind pig should be as successful finding truffles as a sighted one and needn't rely on luck.

Squirells incidentally also use their noses to find acrons and other nuts. Both pigs and dogs are used to find truffles, and I would assume a pig eats aorns (also found by smell), but I haven’t been able to find a reference for people using pigs to find acrons. This means that talking about blind pigs finding acrons means someone has mixed up two aphorisms.

So really the saying means follow your nose. We’ll dissect that saying another time!

Attributed to: Lyndon Johnson  1908-1973

Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

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  • Published in Corn

Spoiled Corn

One of the things we here from many of our customers is how much better their corn dries down and that grain storage problems go away. I don't have independent testing to prove this, but in apples, melon, and many other fruit crops, high calcium content is highly correlated to longer storage life.

Could use of SuperCal 98G and SuperCal SO4 have prevented this disaster?

 One of my friends sent me this picture reportedly from Northwest Iowa:

spoiled corn

Whether your a corn farmer, cooperative member, employee, or consumer grain quality should be as important as quantity. As a corn farmer and cooperative member, if you can't get the grain to market you lose, as an employee of the cooperative being exposed to that much mold, bacteria and fungus can't be good, and as consumers we all lose, since most of it will be blended in with good grain and end up in our food.

If anyone knows anymore information about this picture, I'd love to talk with you, we may be able to help. High quality and high quantity start with the soil!

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

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Crop Clinic in Fort Dodge

Iowa Central Community College in Fort Dodge, IA will be hosting a free, 3-day crop clinic on Jan 27th, Feb 2nd and Feb 9th at 7  pm.

Cropping challenges for 2010 and beyond:

Topics include making crop plans for 2010, soil fertility including soil testing, micro-nutrients, foliar fertilizer, nitrogen programs and use of nitrogen stabilizers, Rresidue management, seed management and treatment, high yield programs, fungicides and diseases, understanding the disease triangle, crop scouting, products and timing, research, and 2009 crop disease explosion, seed traits, insect trends, physiological energy demands, conventional weed control, and new products and uses.

Bob Streit, a private crop consultant, will be the presenter. The program will be held at Iowa Central in Fort Dodge in the Career Education Building, room 108. The program is designed for farmers and agribusiness to keep up to date on corn and soybean production in north central Iowa.

There is no charge for the program, but please call to preregister for the program, call (800) 362-2793, ext. 1277 or call 515-574-1277.

 

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Make Hay While The Sun Shines

 

 

 

 

From: http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/41/messages/299.html 

MAKE HAY WHILE THE SUN SHINES --

Meaning : Act while conditions are favorable. The grass that is going to be used as hay needs to be dried after it is cut: rain is likely to spoil it. The farmer, therefore, sought to cut hay on a day when it seemed likely that the sun would be around for that day and one or two more.

Atributed to: John Heywood listed the advice as proverbial in 1546: 'When the sunne shyneth make hey.'" From "Dictionary of Cliches" by James Rogers (Wings Books, Originally New York: Facts on File Publications, 1985).

 

Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

 

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Need More Proof SuperCal Works

"

One of the comments we get a lot is, what data do you have to support your product works? We have many trials that back our claims, yet many agronomists and farmers need more proof. Sales of SuperCal 98G and SuperCal SO4 have grown stedily every year since we started. The growth in our sales in from farmers trying the product and seeing it works for themselves.

What about the people that need more proof?

Seth Godin says it best in his blog;

Too much data leads to not enough belief

Business plans with too much detail, books with too much proof, politicians with too much granularity... it seems as though more data is a good thing, because data proves the case.

In my experience, data crowds out faith. And without faith, it's hard to believe in the data enough to make a leap. Big mergers, big VC investments, big political movements, large congregations... they don't usually turn out for a spreadsheet.

The problem is this: no spreadsheet, no bibliography and no list of resources is sufficient proof to someone who chooses not to believe. The skeptic will always find a reason, even if it's one the rest of us don't think is a good one. Relying too much on proof distracts you from the real mission--which is emotional connection.

So why don't we have reams of data? Because if you've tried our products you know they work! Makes you wonder why some products work so hard to "prove" they work?!?

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

 

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Phones Back Up

My apologies to all our customers, our Internet went down last night, taking our phones with them.

Some-days I think a little piece and quite would be nice, nothing could be further from the truth. I found out today what it is like to not have the phones ringing (I hope it never happens again, what a nightmare). We are here to serve you and thanks to miserable service from one of our providers we were unable to do that.

Qwest finally has our phones back up. It is my hope that they have finally solved the problem. Since switching to T1 service, our phones and internet have gone out intermittently over the past few months and the quality of the calls has been poor as well. Time will tell if their new service is a completive advantage (which it is billed as) more useless than two tin cans and string.

If you have any questions, concerns or problems getting through to us, please contact me, 515-240-3347.

Thanks for you patience today.

Craig

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

 

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Want to Share your Thoughts on Farming?

I have had a few people ask if I would be willing to let them write an article. I would love to hear other points of view. We are more than happy to have guest authors. A few quick guidelines;

Articles can be anything that is useful for our readers (farmers, though dealers read this too) is good content for a guest post here. It can be related to farming, soil fertility, and it can also be derived from your own personal experiences. There is no minimum or maximum length for your post, but usually I prefer post to be 300-500 words.
 
Guidelines
·         Your post must be original and must have never been published before on the Internet
·         You agree to not publish the post anywhere else (i.e., in your own blog or as a guest post in other blogs)
·         You can’t use SEO’d anchor text for your links
·         Please have your name, title and where you can be found regularly as the first line.
 
To submit your guest post
You can send it to me on the email craig@calciumproducts.com. Usually within 48 hours I will reply stating if we will accept the guest post or not. If I reject your post, you are obviously free to use it in your own blog or to propose it as a guest post to some other website. Once accepted I will post on our blog within the hour.
 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at

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No-Till Farming Conference Wrap Up

While this conference is geared to no-tillers, anyone in production agriculture could learn something from attending this conference. Dan Davidson at DTN says it best here, this conference really is a Farming Think Tank.

There are discussions on all things farming and I know any farmer will get more value out of meeting farmers from around the country, and interacting one-on-one with industry leaders than the cost of the conference.  I highly suggest making plans to attend next year, it will be the second week of Jan. in Cincinnati, Ohio, www.no-tillfarmer.com.

So what did I learn this week, ( besides get the basics right)?

Uneven emergence is a huge yield robber, and a planter needs to be treated as a precision instrument.

Excessive N is released by plants as ammonia gas and is a dinner bell for insects.

Need to inoculate soybeans every year.

Farmer (and agronomist) need to take time to observe their fields, get out of the pickup, dig in the dirt, smell the soil, really look at the plants.

We should worry about how to get soils wet during the dry part of the year and not how to get the dry during the wet part of the year.

Many farmers want more information on gypsum.

You cannot do mechanically to the soil what needs to be done chemically, i.e. compaction is due to the chemical properites of the soil.

There are many more ideas I took away and you can see them at https://twitter.com/CraigDick. Over the next few weeks I will be expanding on these topics.

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

 

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Soil Carbon

I found this link on using BioChar to build soils and reduce CO2 emissions. Whether you agree or disagree with climate change, having high levels of soil carbon (not just organic matter, they are different) will make you soils more productive and increase your nutrient holding capacity. This was an interesting read, even though it is a little long.

http://www.miller-mccune.com/science_environment/the-dirt-on-climate-change-1651?article_page=2

Our new product TRIO has a small amount of leonardite (a naturally occurring carbon source). This product will help keep calcium in the root zone in soils that have low carbon levels, such as sandy soils.

If you have had experience using carbon in your fertilizer program or want to know more about TRIO, I'd love to hear from you.

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

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Maintained by Craig Dick, blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing, we have a wide array of blog articles from Craig and some expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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