Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: November 2010
Calcium Product 98G

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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: November 2010

FSF - If Wishes Were Horses

Meaning: Usually used to suggest that it is useless to wish; better results will be achieved through action.

Origin: Found in James Carmichael's “Proverbs in Scots” printed in 1628.\
 
The full Scottish proverb:
"If wishes were horses, beggars would ride
If turnips were swords, i'd wear one by my side
If ifs and ands were pots and pans, 
there'd be no need for tinkers' hands"
 
There is however an older version, which was recorded in 1605 by William Camden in the book “Remaines of a Greater Worke, Concerning Britaine”,  "If wishes were thrushes beggers would eat birds".
 
There are many variations to this saying, but here are two of the more popular;
A less common variant puts on a whimsical twist: "If wishes were fishes, beggars would fly." The implied idea is that if wishing made it so, one could ride a flying fish.
My personal favorite, "If if's and but's were candy and nuts, we'd all have a Merry Christmas."
 
Merry Christmas! May all your hard work pay off in the New Year!
 
Sources:
 
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  • Published in Corn

Corn Smut, Not Just a Yield Robbing Fungus

Merry Christmas! The holidays are usually filled with all kinds of delicious foods; why not make Corn Smut a new tradition?

 

A PFI member recounts 

"While riding in a train in Mexico back in the 70s, an old man sat down across from me and unwrapped a sizable ear of corn that was completely covered in smut and began to eat it. I knew very well what he was eating but I could hardly believe my own eyes, so I asked him about it and he said,  "Ongo de maiz. (corn fungus) Muy bueno!" He offered me a bite but I politely declined. I was actually sickened watching him eat as he explained that it was a delicacy and healthful. I remained dubious. Looking back, I wish I'd had the grace and guts to have accepted his offer. 

 

To this day, I've never consumed corn smut but I swear, this is the year..... "

 

It turns out that Corn smut is actually good for you!

 

For years, scientists have assumed that huitlacoche (WEET-LA-KO-CHEE, the Spanish pronunciation) — a gnarly, gray-black corn fungus long-savored in Mexico — had nutritional values similar to those of the corn on which it grew. But test results just published in the journal Food Chemistry reveal that an infection that U.S. farmers and crop scientists have spent millions trying to eradicate, is packed with unique proteins, minerals and other nutritional goodies. 

 

Huitlacoche grows best during times of drought in a 78°F to 93°F (25°C–34°C) temperature range. Aztecs purposely inoculated corn with the spores by scratching their corn plants at the soil level with a knife—thereby allowing the water-borne spores easy entrance into the plant. Smut feeds off the corn plant and decreases the yield. Usually smut-infected crops are destroyed or used only for corn silage.

 

 It’s most popular in Mexico, huitlacoch can be regularly found as an option in meals. The consumption of corn smut originates from ancient Aztec cuisine and is still considered a delicacy in Mexico, even being preserved and sold for a significantly higher price than corn. In the United States, a high-profile huitlacoche dinner was held, which tried to get Americans to eat more of it by renaming it the Mexican truffle, which didn’t catch on.

 

For culinary use, the galls are harvested while still immature. Gathered two to three weeks after an ear of corn is infected, still retaining moisture and, when cooked, have a flavor described as mushroom-like, sweet, savory, woody, and earthy.  It looks horrible though, which is why it’s so good for you!  Corn has virtually no lysine; huitlacoche is loaded with it. It also is packed with more beta-glucens than oatmeal. Beta-Glucens is the soluble fiber that gives oatmeal its well-known cholesterol-cutting power.

 

Corn Smut is known as a fast moving blight that can wipe out 5 to 10 percent of a crop and the black dusty spores gum up harvesting equipment. Corn growers, along with the federal government, have spent millions of dollars eradicating it and developing smut-resistant strains, with only partial success. There may be a way to solve the problem, do the one thing Americans do well, EAT!

 

While eradicating the problem is expensive, embracing it may be profitable. An ear of huitlacoche costs about 41 cents to produce and sells for about $1.20. By comparison, an ear of sweet corn costs about less than a dime, with profits of just a few cents per ear.

 

In a seriousness, we'll have some tips on on how to control this and other fungi's and diseases in the New Year!

 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .
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FSF - Rome Wasn't Built in a Day

The last few weeks have been terribly busy with multiple trade shows and meetings. As such I wasn’t able to complete many Farm Saying Friday’s. The one I did When in Rome, was actually requested as Rome wasn’t built in a day. Sorry Paul!

 
ROME WASN'T BUILT IN A DAY
 
Meaning: Important work takes time
 
Origin: This familiar saying was originally a French proverb, 'Rome was not made all in one day,' which was recorded in 'Li Proverbe au Vilain' (c. 1190). The English version did not appear until three centuries later, when it was included first in Richard Taverner's translation of 'Erasmus' Adages' as 'Rome was not buylt in one day’.
 
http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/18/messages/566.html
 

Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.

 
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Conferences

There are a couple of meetings coming up that some of you will find very interesting. If you are wondering what all the talk about glyphosate and micro-nutrients is about or would like to find alternative ways to improve crop production these two meetings should be of interest.

December 14-16th Riverside Casino, Riverside Iowa 

January 4-6th Ramada Inn Hotel &Conference Center, Rochester, MN

Speaker Bios 

Among the speakers at these informative conferences will be Dr. Robert Kremer, Dr. Michael McNeill, Dr. Don Huber, and Bob Streit.

 

 

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SuperCal 98G for No-Till Product of the Year!

Please help Calcium Products, and SuperCal 98G win the No-Till Product of the Year

If you haven't cast your final vote for No-Till Product of the Year, you have just 3 days.

Voting is open to growers only!  It only takes a minute to cast your vote. For voting, you will be entered in a random drawing to win FREE REGISTRATION to the 20th annual National No-Tillage Conference from January 11-14, 2012.

Click here to cast your vote. If you've already voted, you will be redirected to our No-Till Farmer Web site home page.

Voting ends December 5. The winners will be announced at the 19th annual National No-Tillage Conference in Cincinnati, Ohio, from Jan. 12-15, 2011.

Thank you for your participation.

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

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FSF - When in Rome

WHEN IN ROME

While obviously not a farm saying, one of our dealers requested this one. Thanks Paul!

Meaning: It is polite, and possibly also advantageous, to abide by the customs of a society when one is a visitor.

Origin: Why should an English proverb single out Rome and Roman values as especially to be emulated? Couldn't we have had a 'when in Ipswich, do as the Ipswichians do' for example? As it turns out, it's all to do with the travel arrangements of a couple of early Christian saints.
 
St Augustine: Letters Volume I was translated from the Latin by Sister W. Parsons and published in 1951. Letter 54 to Januariuscontains this original text, which date from circa 390AD:
 
When I go to Rome, I fast on Saturday, but here [Milan] I do not. Do you also follow the custom of whatever church you attend, if you do not want to give or receive scandal.
 
Januarius, who was later canonised as a martyr saint, was Bishop of Naples at the time.
The above dates the source of the proverb to at least as early as the beginnings of the Christian church. The implied flexibility on dogma and acceptance of the religious and social practices of other cultures seems to be more akin to the contemporary Buddhist teachings of the Dalai Lama than those of present day Christian authorities.
 
The use of the proverb in English isn't recorded until much later - well into the Middle Ages.
 
 
Source: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/when-in-rome-do-as-the-romans-do.html
 
 

Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.

 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .
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Maintained by Craig Dick, blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing, we have a wide array of blog articles from Craig and some expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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