Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: February 2009
Calcium Product 98G

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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: February 2009

Still Time for Lime

So your dealer has told you that your local quarry has shut down and your dealer cannot get your lime applied.

Now what?!?

If you need lime, there is no substitute. The University of Wisconsin says that if you need lime you should see a 20%-40% increase in yields.

But my P and K numbers are low? If I can't get lime shouldn't I at least apply P & K.

No, if you pH is below 6.0, 25%-50% of N, P and K are unavailable to you crop. Only liming will make these nutrients available to your crop.

Applying fertilizer to soil that has low pH is like trying to bail out a boat before you fix the hole in it. Fertilizer is the main cause of acidity.

In test conducted by one of our customers, applying 600 lbs of SuperCal 98G to a soil pH of 5.1 increased the K by 23% and  P 8% in the soil. No other P or K was applied. The pH was increased to 5.7, while this is a big increase there is still work to be done on this field. Application of another 600-1000 lbs will bring this field into optimal range.

Don't let the quarry cost you money in lost yields and higher fertilizer bills. Apply SuperCal 98G up to planting to increase yields and make soil nutrients available to plants this year.

Every year you wait to apply lime could cost you $200 or more per acre in lost opportunity. Ask your dealer to apply SuperCal 98G today or find one that will on our dealer locator.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Take 2 Calcium & Call Me In The Morning

I like to read some of the different postings on various discussion boards regarding agriculture.  One of my favorite sites recently referred to an article that I found quite interesting.  Here is the link:

http://researchnews.wsu.edu/environment/225.html

This article discusses the role that calcium, when bound to a protein, has by prompting plants to make salicylic acid when it is threatened by infection or other danger.  Salicylic acid (SA), let’s see, it has been a while since chemistry class.  Oh yeah, it is related chemically to aspirin!  According to the director of the study, B.W. Poovaiah, it has been known that plants make SA for quite a while (> than 100 years), but the role of calcium in telling a plant to make SA has been unknown up to now.

Wow!  This is good stuff!  I mean one of the biggest reasons that I chose agronomy over animal science was a remark that I remember from freshmen orientation.  Animals give very specific, unmistakable indications when they are not feeling well or under stress.  Plants, well let’s just say that they are often more subtle about it.  But this article helps us understand that they too are not passive about putting together a defense plan to ward off infection.

The downside?  Plants that have high levels of SA will be very resistant to infection, but have slower growth.  Plants with too little SA will grow very rapidly, but are susceptible to infection.  Makes sense, many things in life & nature follow the rule that some is good but too much or too little causes problems.
 
Another great reason to make sure that you don’t neglect calcium nutrition when finalizing your crop plans for 2009.  SuperCal 98G & SO4 are both great sources of calcium, that’s why they are called Super!  Why not try some today & give your crop a head start (but not a headache).

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Our Priorities - Customer Value

I was reading an article this morning about a large cooperative and their priorities.

"We will focus on our strengths: increasing sales, maximizing margins, capturing service revenues, and implementing new technology."

I would think that they would want to focus on increasing patron income, maximizing yields, reducing input costs, and working for the success of the patron.

The goals of a company shouldn't be at odds with that of their customers. In fact the really successful companies focus on creating customer value, not just selling them products.

If your supplier is more interested in selling you a product and increasing their bottom line than increasing yours, I'd look for a new supplier.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Fog Days

Have you heard the old saying “90 days after a fog you can expect precipitation”? Are you a fog day counter? Is there any scientific backing to it?

My grandmother counted fog days and said more often than not they were right. I too have counted them and I would say they are accurate to within 3-5 days.
 
According to the NOAA:
In looking where this statement “it rains 90 days after fog” comes from, the search only found two statements that where similar, however both where for winter snowfall not rain. However, they seem to be related. The other two statements are “the more fog in August the more snow in winter” and “for every fog in August, there will be a snowfall in the winter.” All three statements relate the occurrence of fog with precipitation in the next season. And these all seem to originate from Ben Franklin.
 
In a study they conducted in Montana, in looking at the past several years of observations in Glasgow (January 2000 to July 2006) there is precipitation (rain or snow) 1 out of every 4 days, about 25% of the time. Looking over the same period of time it snowed or rained 90 days after fog about 27% of the time. The difference between the two is very slight and statistically the difference is small, thus the statement that it rains 90 days after fog is really no better than saying it will rain 90 days after today or 90 days after the first robin appears.
  
So is counting fog days reliable?
 
Well not according to this study, but I observed that the whole month of August 2009 was foggy in Gilmore City and the whole month of Dec was snowy. So far it has been foggy every day this week, which according to the myth, the first week of June will be wet.
 
In an article today from the Bismarck Tribune:
 
Tuesday was the year’s 68th day. Of those 68 days, fog was reported in Bismarck on 54 days. On 17 days, the fog was considered “dense.”  
 
Which if you are a fog day follower could indicate another cool wet year.
 
If you have counted fog days, I’d love to hear your thoughts. Whether there is truth to fog day or not, hopefully all this talking about the fog will help it go away, I am ready for the sun and spring to get here!
 
 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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  • Published in Corn

Iowa State Sulfur Research

From Iowa State Crop Notes for March 4 2009

SULFUR FERTILIZER RESEARCH TRIALS ON CORN

Summary of Research Trials 2007-2008

Summarizing results of 45 trials across the 2 years, 62% of the sites had a statistically significant yield increase to applied S fertilizer.  The across-site yield increase averaged 13 bu/acre for all sites.  Analyzed across S rates, the economic optimum S rate was 16 lb S/acre for fine-textured soils and 23 lb S/acre for coarse-textured soils. The research indicates that S application is an economically viable fertilization practice on many soils.  However, the research also shows that corn does not respond to S application in all fields or field areas.  The best way to determine this is to conduct 1 or more sulfur fertilizer strips trial on your own farm.
 
The research confirms that (1) The S soil test is no help in determining need for S fertilizer; (2) Plant analysis of %S in ear leaves sampled at VT is not accurate enough to determine S need either; (3) While organic matter is an important source of S, it is not a clear deciding factor either for S fertilization.  (4) The only absolute has been the need for S on a sand or loamy sand soil lacking a recent manure application.  In addition, this work indicates that more research is needed regarding plant and soil S tests, plant canopy S stress sensing, site characteristics, and S deposition in order to develop better predictive indices of S deficiency and need for S fertilization.  Hopefully one of these tools conducted that right way could provide better decision making and enhance positive economic return to S fertilization for producers.
 
I Need a Few Serious Cooperators for 2009

ISU wants to establish 6 on-farm field scale replicated strip-trial in northeast Iowa in 2009.  I am looking for the following:
1)  Fields with no manure or sulfur fertilizer applications for at least the last 5 years.
2)  A farmer &/or ag supplier willing to take the time to make sure that the field gets spread properly.
     a)  The product must be calcium sulfate (gypsum).
     b)  Application most likely done with a spinner spreader as a separate application from other fertilizer applications, alternating strips the entire length of the field with a minimum of 4 strips with sulfur and 4 strips without sulfur.
     c)  Application best done early April (or late March if field conditions are okay), before other spring field operations pick up speed.  It could be applied before or after any secondary tillage passes, or also surface applied on no-till.
     d)  The strips are properly flagged.
3)  Harvest could be done with a yield monitor (preferred) or weigh wagon.  If by yield monitor, we would like a copy of the harvest data file.
 
Please email me if you are interested.  As usual, I have no money to put towards this project.  Any interested individual should be interested because they want to know if sulfur fertilizer can help their operation.  Currently we do not have any analytical tool (soil test, plant analysis, etc.) that helps us determine if the corn crop needs sulfur.  So this trial will help you on your farm, but you would have to afford the sulfur fertilizer and the extra time to harvest the trial.  ISU would be 100% responsible for conducting some additional tasks in these trials, including:  soil test, plant analysis, plant sensor readings, and a small plot multiple-rate sulfur trial overlaid in an untreated check strip.

Brian J Lang
ISU Extension Agronomist
911 S. Mill Street, Decorah, IA 52101
Ph 563-382-2949
Fax 563-382-2940
Email bjlang@iastate.edu

Mark Wuebker will be conducting similar trials in the Des Moines/Ankeny area. Anyone interested in participating in these strip trials should contact Mark or Brian.

Mark Wuebker
ISU Extension Agronomist
1625 ADVENTURELAND DR STE A, ALTOONA, IA 50009-2249
Phone: (515) 957-5778
Fax: (515) 967-6164
Email: mwuebker@iastate.edu

Calcium Products will be assisting Iowa State in this research.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Bean varieties not keeping up with root rots, try calcium

Just saw this article from Ag Professional:

 

Stem Canker and Charcoal Rot in Soybeans
Mar. 4, 2009

Source: University of Wisconsin

By early August 2008, reports started coming in to county Extension offices and the University of Wisconsin of soybean fields with symptoms similar to Phytophthora root rot (PRR). Because many of these fields were planted to varieties containing the Rps 1k gene, serious concern arose over the breakdown of resistance to PRR conferred by this gene.

The 2008 growing season was one of extremes. Heavy rains early in the year led to flooded field conditions and anxiety about diseases caused by Pythium and Phytophthora. Then the rains stopped, fields dried out, and drought-like conditions occurred throughout much of the state. In spite of these dry conditions, by early August reports started coming in to county extension offices and the University of Wisconsin of soybean fields with symptoms similar to PRR. Because many of these fields were planted to varieties containing the Rps 1k gene, serious concern arose over the breakdown of resistance to PRR conferred by this gene.

Phytophthora root rot is a disease commonly a associated with low available soil calcium and low soil oxygen. See our previous article on root rot. Increasing the calcium increase root growth and vigor. Adding calcium to the soil will also increase oxygen to the soil helping to slow the pathogen.

Even if you have high pH you may be short on calcium. Hydrogen is the only thing that pH measures and has nothing to do with calcium availability. SuperCal SO4 increases soil calcium and doesn't raise pH.

SuperCal SO4 is an excellent way to inexpensively reduce root rots. As an added benefit you'll see a reduction in white mold too.

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Calcium Products Receives OMRI Certification

SuperCal 98G and SuperCal SO4 have always been made to standards that are allowable for organic production. Over the past couple of years we have had increasing calls from our customers to have our products certified.

I am pleased to announce that SuperCal 98G and SuperCal SO4 are officially OMRI Listed.

“Since we didn’t have to make any changes to our production there won’t be any big changes in price or availability”, stated Larry Moore, President of Calcium Products. He continued, “Becoming OMRI Certified will make it easier for our organic customers to use our products.”

You can access documentation of our certification by going to the analysis pages of SuperCal SO4 and SuperCal 98G, or by going to http://www.omri.org/.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Maintained by Craig Dick, blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing, we have a wide array of blog articles from Craig and some expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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