Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: June 2008
Calcium Product 98G

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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: June 2008

  • Published in Calcium

Increasing Potassium Avaialablity

The price of fertilizer is continuing to climb. With the price of commodities it will be difficult for many to apply less fertilizer fearing a loss of yield. With proper management and knowledge of your soils you may just be able to apply less fertilizer and increase yields. In this memo from Midwest Labs for soil with higher magnesium and higher CEC here are some options to increase Potassium availability;

Potassium availability, and/or rate of exchange, can be enhanced by one or more of the following:
1. Optimum potassium soil test levels per C.E.C. range and percent magnesium values.
2. K2O fertilizer applied in bands.
    a. Starter
    b. Surface band
    c. Subsurface band
    d. Combination of (a) + (b) or (a) + (c).
3. Improve soil aeration
4. Adequate exchangeable soil calcium.
    a. Calcium increases potassium adsorption into the plant (2).
    b. Use calcitic lime on acid soils excess in magnesium.
    c. Use gypsum where soil pH is greater than 6.4 on soils with excess magnesium.
    d. Calcium additions can help alleviate soil compaction zones and promotes good soil structure

From: SOIL & FERTILIZER MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS FOR SOILS EXCESS IN MAGNESIUM

See more information from Midwest Labs

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Your turf doesn’t have to suffer in the drought!

Chances are good that you are one of the 57% in the midst of the drought affecting the USA. While it may be too late to keep your turf from going dormant, it is never too late to prepare for the future. I’ll try to not get too scientific but wanted to share some documented results in plant survival and drought tolerance.

We have known for a long time at Calcium Products the benefits of gypsum in protecting against droughts and localized dry spots. The most important thing to remember when the weather becomes hot and dry is that it’s normal for your turf to go into survival mode known as dormancy. It is a natural reaction to a lack of water. Your turf is not dying, just shutting down to protect itself. If it stays in dormancy for an extended amount of time before you have to worry about the turf dying out.

One of the best ways to protect your turf is to apply SuperCal SO4 pelletized gypsum, manufactured by Calcium Products, Inc. One of the more important benefits of applying SuperCal SO4 is that it helps create structure to your soil. Without proper structure in your soil, a drought will lead to hardening of the soils as they dry out, localized dry spots, cracking of the soils and crusting of the top layer of soil.


houston.JPGBy applying SuperCal SO4 you will see these benefits to your turf:

Reduced soil hardening

Reduction of crusting and cracking

Increased water retention

Flocculation of clay soils

Increased rooting

Reduction in the need for irrigation to maintain lushness of turf

Increase protection against pest and disease pressures

Unlock the nutrients in your soil for plant uptake

Now is the time to prepare for the future! Treat your turf, your plants and your garden to SuperCal SO4 and see results you can be proud of. Set the standard in your neighborhood!

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Nitrate Toxicity

With corn silage season coming up this is a good time to talk about nitrate poisoning. Typically associated with drought and rain after dry conditions, there are other factors to that can cause high nitrate in forage crops. High rates of N, low or high levels of molybdenum, low sulfur, and low boron, and events that upset normal plant growth like early frosts.

New pastures are known to be high in nitrate, especially the faster they grow, the more toxic they can become. Hybrid ryegrass is one of the most dangerous. If reseeding pastures this fall make sure to add edible clover which normally do not have high nitrate levels.

Nitrate poisoning has been on the rise in the past decade, this could be due to the reluctance of today's generation to lime pastures (molybdenum levels drop with acid soils), increase use of urea on pastures, and less sulfur naturally being applied due to clean air laws.

Nitrate Toxicity is aggravated by:

Excess N application in the autumn after a dry period of no growth
Rain and warmth after a no-grow period
Fast plant growth
Stressed plants, from drought, hot wind, frost, and hail
Low sunshine
Fast eating by underfed, hungry animals
Low pasture molybdenum - below 0.5 ppm, 1.6 ppm is optimum
Molybdenum levels above 4 ppm, especially if pasture sulfur is low
Low sulfur levels, below 0.25 ppm
Low calcium and phosphorus levels
Nitrate is highest in the morning, when rotating cattle wait until mid afternoon

While environment can have an impact on nitrate levels, having the proper soil nutrients in the proper levels is great insurance from nitrate poisoning. As a bonus you'll enjoy better pasture performance, and high gains from your animals.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Update to Treating Pet Burns

A couple of months back I posted an article on treating pet burns with SuperCal SO4.

While a broadcast application helped out significantly,  I did have to go back and treat the more severe spots by hand.

You can see how well SuperCal SO4 can bring back grass.

Yard_080715_blog.jpg

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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SuperCal SO4 on Golf Courses

On Thursday I spent the day with one of our turf distributors. Scott Goes, owner of Nebraska Landscape Solutions, in Lincoln Nebraska. Scott services golf courses, sports turf fields, and lawn care professionals in southeastern Nebraska.

Scott took me to see a couple of golf courses. The first was Beatrice Country Club. We meet with the golf course superintendent Andy Hamilton. Andy has many challenges to deal with, watering with effluent water, low lying greens that don’t dry properly, and recent new hole construction. BCC has utilized SuperCal SO4 for a number of years to fix the problems of watering with effluent water.

I had not been to this course but Andy is doing a great job. If you’re in the Beatrice area stop in for a round, you wont be disappointed

The second course we visited was Hidden Acres Golf Course just outside of Beatrice. Jim Workman who is the superintendent there also has many challenges; Small budget, little help, and not enough equipment. Jim has been using SuperCal SO4 on his greens and fairways for two years. This year he had a 3” water main break. The watering system was not set up to have zones and the whole system had to be shut down for repairs. This lasted 4 days. None of the greens or fairways had water and one day the temps where is the 90’s. Jim was nervous, but he said he couldn’t believe how well the turf held up.

I had golfed this course in 2001 or 2002 and there has been a dramatic improvement in the quality of the turf over the past few years. Great job Jim!

Thanks again Scott, Andy, and Jim, I really enjoyed seeing your courses… next time I’ll bring the sticks!

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Fertilzer Costs Continue to Rise Fertilzer Costs Continue to Rise

More bad news on the inputs front from Ohio State (see below), fertilizer prices continue to surge.

Wednesday afternoon, CNBC's Fast Money program interviewed Mike Wilson, CEO of Agrium. Mr.Wilson Stated that demand is not falling off, supply will not meet demand for 3-5 years, they are in effect sold out, their inventory is so low they can't produce enough.

Might be time to really think about your fertilization program for next fall. You certainly don't want to short your yield with the price of corn, but does it really make sense to keep putting on high levels of expensive fertilizer (P-K)?

When was the last time you applied lime? When was the last time you soil sampled? Might be worth a couple of dollars an acre in lab costs to find out what you need and what you don't. When is the last time you applied micros like sulfur, boron, or copper?

Now is the time to start planning that fall fertilization. Lime prices are relatively unchanged and is a bargain compared to potash. It will also make any fertilizer you apply work better!

Call us, or one of our dealers, they can help you reduce your fertilizer costs, and still maintain yields, maybe even increase it!

From Ohio State:

Fertilizer Prices Continue Higher - Barry Ward, Brian Freytag

Retail fertilizer prices in Ohio continue to surge as a combination of strong world demand, supply shortages, supply disruptions, high energy/transportation costs and a weak U.S. dollar make for a bad combination for farmers looking to make purchases.

Retail fertilizer price surveys show anhydrous ammonia prices to be 16% higher than they were in mid-March. Anhydrous Ammonia prices averaged $910 per ton on July 2nd compared to $782 per ton on March 26th. Retail UAN (28%) averaged $425/ton on July 2nd while UAN (28%) shipped direct to farm storage averaged $402/ton. Urea prices are significantly higher (36%), averaging $705/ton on July 2nd compared to $520/ton on March 26th.

Phosphorous fertilizers prices continue to hit new records as MAP and DAP both are averaging over $1000 per ton. As of July 2nd our survey showed MAP averaging $1092/ton and DAP averaging $1195/ton. This compares to the March 26th spot prices of $914/ton for MAP and $917/ton for DAP.

Potash is also experiencing big run-ups in price as the average price on July 2nd was $686/ton. This is a 24% increase over the March 26th price of $557/ton.

Prices as of 6/17/08
Cost per lb. of actual N:
Anhydrous Ammonia: $910/ton = $0.555/lb. of N
UAN (28%): $425/ton = $0.759/lb. of N
UAN (28%) Direct: $402/ton = $0.718/lb. of N
Urea: $705/ton = $0.766/lb. of N

Cost per lb. of actual P2O5 (value of N not considered for this illustration):
MAP (11-52-0): $1092/ton = $1.05/lb. of P2O5
DAP (18-46-0): $1195/ton = $1.15/lb. of P2O5

Cost per lb. of actual K2O:
Potash (0-0-60): $686/ton = $0.572/lb. of K2O

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Jacks Magic Seeds

With the Fourth of July coming up, we are heading down to Hebron, Nebraska to spend time with family. We are planning on spending a day with my brother and his wife and four kids. One of the things I have planned is to tell them the story of Jack and the Beanstalk.

You may have heard it, or tell it pretty often. If you plant these “special seeds” all your dreams will come true, herbicide tolerance, insect resistance, disease resistance, better standablity, better roots, all leading to higher yield, and more piece of mind.

Ok so it’s not the popular version you heard as a kid, but sounds pretty similar.

Deep down we all want an easy solution to our problems. It would be really nice to solve all our problems with planting a different variety or brand of seed. We all know this is a fairy tale and can’t possibly come true.

While it is important to plant the proper genetics on your soil, the point to not forget is the soil. If you don’t know your soils pH and fertility levels it will be really hard to match the right genetics to it. More over having soil that is properly fertilized will always out perform soil of poor fertility, in conditions of drought and heavy rainfall.

So when you get done listening to fairy tales thank the seed salesman for the fond memories of childhood, then get out your soil text books and start solving your problems.

Have a great Fourth of July!!

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Maintained by Craig Dick, blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing, we have a wide array of blog articles from Craig and some expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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