Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: April 2008
Calcium Product 98G

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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: April 2008

  • Published in Calcium

Do you use facial tissue... or Kleenex?

Are you using pel-lime or SuperCal 98G?

What's the difference?

This article from Early To Rise does a good job explaining it.

It's Good to Know: Brand Names So Good, We Use Them All the Time

By Suzanne Richardson

Recently, Google has been up in arms because people are using ""google"" as a verb. That's all well and good when you're talking about using Google to google something. But when "google" applies to searching on any search engine, they get a little testy. And no wonder. It IS possible for a brand name to become so popular that it slips into the common vernacular... and loses all traces of its corporate identity in the process.

Do you use facial tissue... or Kleenex? And if you blow your nose with Puffs or Scott, do you still call it kleenex?

When you use the copy machine, are you photocopying or xeroxing?

Kleenex and Xerox aren't alone. Zipper, elevator, cellophane, thermos, and escalator are other examples of brand names turned generic.

This article appears courtesy of Early To Rise, the Internet’s most popular health, wealth, and success e-zine. For a complimentary subscription, visit http://www.earlytorise.com.


All "Pel-Lime" is not the same. Pel-lime is the generic term for pelletized limestone. Anyone can pelletize any quality of limestone. The pelletizing doesn't make it better.

SuperCal 98G has a higher purity and is ground finer than any other "pel-lime" in the country. This makes it much more effective than all others. When applying pelletized lime, ask for SuperCal 98G.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Rolaids for your soil

Many enjoyed a long weekend filled with friends, grilling and lots of food. Ever notice how the first bratwursts tastes way better than the fifth?

I might have over done it on brats, burgers, cookies, and ice cream this weekend!
By Monday afternoon the only thing that sounded good was a couple of Rolaids and a nap.

The same thing happens when you over feed your soil. You don’t get near the yield (enjoyment) from the last 50 pounds of nitrogen as the first 50. In fact adding too much nitrogen requires that you add lime to you soil. Liming your soil works like Rolaids in your belly. It reduces the acidity of the soil, so when you add more food (N), you enjoy higher yields.

With the costs of fertilizer inputs, now is the time to look at a program to lime fields that have proper fertility levels. By keeping you pH neutral you can increase plant available N, P, and K 25%-100% versus letting your soil get acid.

Avoid low available fertilizer, poor root growth, and low yields by keeping your pH neutral with SuperCal 98G

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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I'm not a farmer but I play one on T.V.

"It is an old saying that ""any fool can farm,"" and this was almost the truth when farming consisted chiefly in reducing the fertility of new, rich land secured at practically no cost from a generous Government. But to restore depleted soils to high productive power in economic systems is no fool's job, for it requires mental as well as muscular energy; and no apologies should be expected from those who necessarily make use of technical terms in the discussion of this technical subject, notwithstanding the common foolish advice that farmers should be given a sort of ""parrot"" instruction in almost baby language instead of established facts and principles in definite and permanent scientific terms. The farmer should be as familiar with the names of the ten essential elements of plant food as he is with the names of his ten nearest neighbors. Safe and permanent systems of soil improvement and preservation may come with intelligence--never with ignorance--on the part of the landowners."

From: The Story of the Soil by Cyril G. Hopkins, Professor of Soils and Crops, University of Illinois, 1910.

How well do you know the soil? If you're a professional farmer, agronomist, or consultant you should know it very well.

Just as you would expect your doctor to know the human body, or your tractor mechanic to understand electrical and hydraulic principles, you as a farmer, should know the soil.

Not knowing the soil and applying the same fertilizers as your neighbors is like taking the same medication your doctor prescribes your neighbor. Not very wise and potentially detrimental.

Planting is nearing and we'll soon be done with spraying. How will you spend your spare time this summer, watching baseball, or fishing? Will you decide that now is the time to really understand plant nutrition and what happens in the soil that creates your lively hood.

Where to start? Try these links.

http://books.google.com/books
Many free books available to read online

http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page
A number of free books to read online

I will be posting a list of books I am planning on reading this summer on a future blog.

Have a great Memorial Day Weekend!

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Having a bad day? Go roll in the dirt

From Science Daily, Getting Dirty May Lift Your Mood.

Treatment of mice with a 'friendly'  soil bacteria altered their behavior in a way similar to effects from antidepressant drugs, reports research published in the latest issue of Neuroscience.

This leaves us wondering if we shouldn't all be spending more time playing in the dirt.

When the team looked closely at the brains of mice, they found that treatment with M. vaccae activated a group of neurons that produce the brain chemical serotonin. The lack of serotonin in the brain is thought to cause depression in people, thus M. vaccae's effects on the behavior of mice may be due to increasing the release of serotonin in parts of the brain that regulate mood.

Go ahead, play in the dirt, your mom won't mind!

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Treating pet burns with SuperCal SO4

In a past blog on burn problems on turf I told you how SuperCal SO4 can help eliminate pet burn spots. I wanted to show you how well it works.

I have a 2 year old Great Dane. Since our road is very busy, we let him out on a lead to do his business. I thought I had him trained to go around to the side yard near the field. I guess with the cold windy winter he wanted to do it out of the wind, right in front of the house.

Since I do not farm, my yard is my crop and I take pride in making it look nice. A spotted dog is fine but a spotted lawn is not. To take care of the spots, I spread SuperCal SO4 at 40#/1000 sq ft on April 1st. There has been significant improvement.

 April_1.jpg

 SuperCal SO4 applied April 1

 May_1.jpg

 Yard 30 days after application

 

May_15.jpg

 Yard 45 days after application - As you can see there is still some spotting left, I will treat those spots tonight by hand.

 

 Yard_080715_blog.jpg

 I hand treated the pet spots on May 19th, This picture was taken on July 16. While there are still a few small spots left most are completely closed in!

 

For a few of the tougher spots, I will be applying a new formula to see if it works any better.

 

I'll keep you updated on the progress.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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  • Published in Sulfur

What can sulfur do for your pastures

Corn response to sulfur in Iowa is reported to give an increase in yield 82% of the time. Over half the states in the US have reported sulfur deficient soils. The clean air laws and reduced sulfur content of fuels has decreased the amount of sulfur reaching fields… and pastures.

Sulfur is use to build proteins, amino acids and enzymes. Forages grown with adequate sulfur will have a higher protein content and lower nitrate content.

Fertilizing your pasture with SuperCal SO4 has many positive effects on the amount and quality of the grass. This leads to higher intakes, improved gains and higher stocking rates.

Increasing the sulfur content of your forages will result increase meat-, wool- and milk production. The higher production is due increased dry matter, and cellulose digestibility, increased feed intake and improved nitrogen balance.

Dairy cattle performance can be improved as well. Improvements included a higher production of milk solids, milk fat, and milk protein and milk casein. The higher casein content raised cheese yields.

Under conditions of a sulfur deficiency, increased sulfur of beef cattle rations not only improved average daily weight gain, but also decreased feed costs per pound of gain and increased the carcass grading

Don’t let sulfur limit your production, add SuperCal SO4 your fertility program.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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  • Published in Corn

Corn Emergence Problems

While this article was published by The Ohio State, it is good information for every corn farmer
 
In some Ohio counties, corn planting is nearly complete and corn is emerging, whereas in others, little or no corn has been planted due to persistent rain and cool soil conditions.
 
Diagnosing emergence problems early is critical in identifying solutions and developing successful replant plans, if needed. Here's a list of a few common things to look for if you encounter an emergence problem in corn this spring. (some of this information has been adapted from a newsletter article by Dr. Greg Roth, my counterpart at Penn State). 
 
- No seed present. May be due to planter malfunction or bird or rodent damage. The latter often will leave some evidence such as digging or seed or plant parts on the ground.
 
- Coleoptile (shoot) unfurled, leafing-out underground. Could be due to premature exposure to light in cloddy soil, planting too deep, compaction or soil crusting, extended exposure to acetanilide herbicides under cool wet conditions, combinations of several of these factors, or may be due to extended cool wet conditions alone.
 
- Seed with poorly developed radicle (root) or coleoptile. Coleoptile tip brown or yellow. Could be seed rots or seed with low vigor. Although corn has just started to emerge or has not yet emerged, growers should carefully inspect seedlings for symptoms of disease. This is especially true in lower lying areas of fields where ponding and saturated soils were more likely. Seeds and seedlings that are brown in color, are soft and fall apart easily while digging are obviously dead or dying. Seeds and seedling roots or shoots that have a weft of white to pinkish mold growing on them are likely victims of fungal attack and will likely die. Pythium and Fusarium are common fungi that attack plants and cause these damping-off or seedling blight symptoms under wet, cool conditions. It is more difficult to diagnose disease damage on plants that also show abnormal growth caused by cold soil conditions or by crusting of the soil surface. However, dark, discolored roots and crowns, instead of a healthy creamish-white appearance, are typical symptoms of seedling diseases problems. So, it is best to check these seedlings very closely for dark brown or soft areas on seedling roots and shoots. Any discoloration will indicate a problem that could worsen if the soils remain cold or wet.
 
- Seed has swelled but not sprouted. Often poor seed-to-soil contact or shallow planting- seed swelled then dried out. Check seed furrow closure in no-till. Seed may also not be viable.
 
- Skips associated with discolored and malformed seedlings. May be herbicide damage. Note depth of planting and herbicides applied compared with injury symptoms such as twisted roots, club roots, or purple plants.
 
- Seeds hollowed out. Seed corn maggot or wireworm. Look for evidence of the pest to confirm.
 
- Uneven emergence. May be due to soil moisture and temperature variability within the seed zone. Poor seed to soil contact caused by cloddy soils. Soil crusting. Other conditions that result in uneven emergence already noted above, including feeding by various grub species.
 
Note patterns of poor emergence. At times they are associated with a particular row, spray width, hybrid, field or residue that may provide some additional clues to the cause. Often two or more stress factors interact to reduce emergence where the crop would have emerged well with just one present. Also, note the population and the variability of the seed spacing. This information will be valuable in the future.
 
Don’t forget that corn may take up to 3 to 4 weeks to emerge when soil conditions are not favorable (e.g. temperatures below 55 degrees F, inadequate soil moisture). This was widely observed in many fields in 2005 when corn planted in mid April did not emerge until the first or second week of May. As long as stands are not seriously reduced, delayed emergence usually does not have a major negative impact on yield. However, when delayed emergence is associated with uneven plant development, yield potential can be reduced.
 
The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!
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  • Published in Corn

Iowa soil short of nutrients after all

For years our customers have told us that they are growing better corn and beans than ever with our products. Was it the calcium or the sulfur, or something else? For years Iowa State has told us that Iowa soils have enough calcium and sulfur, well calcium anyway. In the newest research they have found corn does respond to applied sulfur, 82% of the time.

Summary from: Evaluation of Corn Response to Sulfur Fertilization in Northeast Iowa, John Sawyer

Corn grain yield increase to S fertilization has occurred with high frequency in these studies. Also, the magnitude of yield increase has been large. Across the two years and three studies, 82% of the sites had a statistically significant yield increase to applied S fertilizer. By study, statistically significant across-site yield increases averaged 15, 18, and 38 bu/acre. Analyzed across S rate, the economic optimum S rate was 14 lb S/acre for fine-textured soils and 24 lb S/acre for coarse-textured soils. This research indicates a dramatic change in need for S fertilization in northeast Iowa, and that S application is an economically viable fertilization practice on many soils.

Read the whole article here.

In case you've never used sulfur products their price is rising along with other inputs. Many dealers have reported not being able to source enough sulfur. Fortunately since SuperCal SO4 is made in Iowa from a natural mined source, its price has not risen as dramatically as other sulfur products. In fact using SuperCal SO4 in bulk at the universities recommendations will cost you $7.50 to $10.50 per acre, quite a bit cheaper than other products on the market.

While we have been sold out for over a year we have just finished our plant expansion and should be able to meet demand for the coming years. As an added bonus, SuperCal SO4 doesn’t cause soil acidity like ammonium sulfate, thiosulfate, or elemental sulfur does. Though we do sell lime is you want to add more cost to your fertilizer bill!

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

Read more...

Iowa soil short of nutrients after all

For years our customers have told us that they are growing better corn and beans than ever with our products. Was it the calcium or the sulfur, or something else? For years Iowa State has told us that Iowa soils have enough calcium and sulfur, well calcium anyway. In the newest research they have found corn does respond to applied sulfur, 82% of the time.

Summary from: Evaluation of Corn Response to Sulfur Fertilization in Northeast Iowa, John Sawyer

Corn grain yield increase to S fertilization has occurred with high frequency in these studies. Also, the magnitude of yield increase has been large. Across the two years and three studies, 82% of the sites had a statistically significant yield increase to applied S fertilizer. By study, statistically significant across-site yield increases averaged 15, 18, and 38 bu/acre. Analyzed across S rate, the economic optimum S rate was 14 lb S/acre for fine-textured soils and 24 lb S/acre for coarse-textured soils. This research indicates a dramatic change in need for S fertilization in northeast Iowa, and that S application is an economically viable fertilization practice on many soils.

Read the whole article here.

In case you've never used sulfur products their price is rising along with other inputs. Many dealers have reported not being able to source enough sulfur. Fortunately since SuperCal SO4 is made in Iowa from a natural mined source, its price has not risen as dramatically as other sulfur products. In fact using SuperCal SO4 in bulk at the universities recommendations will cost you $7.50 to $10.50 per acre, quite a bit cheaper than other products on the market.

While we have been sold out for over a year we have just finished our plant expansion and should be able to meet demand for the coming years. As an added bonus, SuperCal SO4 doesn’t cause soil acidity like ammonium sulfate, thiosulfate, or elemental sulfur does. Though we do sell lime is you want to add more cost to your fertilizer bill!

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

Read more...

Blossom-End Rot

We have received a number of phone calls recently on SuperCal SO4 and SuperCal 98G for tomatoes. SuperCal SO4 is the best product on the market to eleminate blossom-end rot. As always start with a proper soil analysis, then add fertilizers and amendments as need.

Blossom end rot:

Blossom-end rot is a nonparasitic disease of tomato, pepper and watermelon. Losses can vary from a trace to more than 50%.

Symptoms

The first symptom is a slight water-soaked area on or near the blossom end of the fruit. The affected area soon darkens and enlarges in a constantly widening circle until the fruit begins to ripen. The tissues are dark and shrunken and have a dry, leathery appearance. With pepper the rot is tan in color and should not be confused with sunscald, which is white. The affected area may be merely a speck or it may involve half or more of the fruit. Secondary microorganisms may grow on the decayed area.

Cause

Blossom end rot is caused by a lack of calcium in the developing fruit. This may be due to a lack of calcium uptake from the soil or to extreme fluctuations in water supply. Incidence of blossom-end rot is also increased where there is a low ratio of calcium to certain other nutrients such as potassium and nitrogen.

Control

Although the most desirable calcium levels for preventing blossom-end rot have not been determined, the application of lime (SuperCal 98G) to fields known to be low in calcium has helped to prevent the disease. Soil should be limed according to recommendations of soil analysis report, usually to pH 6.5-6.8. The use of gypsum (SuperCal SO4), at rates of 500 to 1000 pounds per acre (1 to 2 pounds per 100 square feet) can be be used at all soil pH's.

SuperCal 98G and SuperCal SO4 can be applied 2 weeks in advance of planting due to the fineness of the base material. Other lime and gypsum materials may need to be applied months in advance.

source: http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/pp/notes/oldnotes/vg19.htm

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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