Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: March 2008
Calcium Product 98G

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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: March 2008

The blame game

We talk about soil quality a lot on this blog. It should be the thing you focus most on. Having a soil that is soft, stable, and has good organic matter makes everything else work better.

It's not the seed companies fault that corn lodges in your field if it is hard as concrete, has low organic matter, and low calcium levels.
It's not the chemical companies fault that there chemicals don't kill foxtail in your fields if the pH is too low or soil calcium levels are low.

It's not the equipment dealers fault their planter balls up with mud if the soil is damp, has little organic matter, or low calcium levels.

 end row shovel

Soil is less sticky and prone to compaction when calcium and organic matter levels are high


It's up to you to take the steps to develep your fields into quality soils. It won't be done by phosporous or potash alone. It startes with a full soil analysis and applying the right fertilizers in the right amount.

When you start to get it right your enjoy farming alot more. It will be easy to beat the county average in yield, you'll be planting and harvesting 2 to 3 days sooner than your neighbors after a rain - without causing compaction. Rain won't pond on your fields, it will be absorbed by the soil waiting in reserve for hot dry days.

garden_structure.JPG 
The above picture was taken today, we have had over an inch possibly as much as 3 inches (it's been hard to tell, most of the rain has been coming in sideways).

 

You can continue to fight the seed, chemical, and equipment companies, or you can make a few simple changes that will have a much bigger reward than a few small product rebates. After all it's no ones fault but yours if your soil is in poor condition.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Fertility is key, but not exciting

I was reading an article from the Corn and Soybean Digest entitled “Yield Contest Winner Provides Last-Minute Corn Growing Tips”. I found one sentence particularly interesting, “Everything has to be managed exactly right,” he says. “Fertility is the key, but I experiment all the time to find out what works best for my area.”

The reason it is interesting is because it is the only sentence in the whole article about fertility. I find it extremely curious that every article about NCGA winners talks about what seed type they use, what seed treatment and/or insecticide is used, and the herbicide and fungicides.

In almost every article about NCGA winners you are lucky to find 2 or 3 sentences about the fertility of the farm.

Since the champion growers are planting the same corn, at the same populations, with the same seed treatments herbicides and fungicides as almost every farmer uses, why doesn’t everyone grow 250+ bushel corn?

Proper fertility is hard work, results are hard to measure, and it’s not as exciting as “I applied product x and I grew 20 more bushels of corn!” Why do some genetics result in record yields in some fields and the same genetics in your field falls down? Soil quality and fertility might just have something to do with it.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!
 

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  • Published in Corn

Fertility is key, but not exciting

I was reading an article from the Corn and Soybean Digest entitled “Yield Contest Winner Provides Last-Minute Corn Growing Tips”. I found one sentence particularly interesting, “Everything has to be managed exactly right,” he says. “Fertility is the key, but I experiment all the time to find out what works best for my area.”

The reason it is interesting is because it is the only sentence in the whole article about fertility. I find it extremely curious that every article about NCGA winners talks about what seed type they use, what seed treatment and/or insecticide is used, and the herbicide and fungicides.

In almost every article about NCGA winners you are lucky to find 2 or 3 sentences about the fertility of the farm.

Since the champion growers are planting the same corn, at the same populations, with the same seed treatments herbicides and fungicides as almost every farmer uses, why doesn’t everyone grow 250+ bushel corn?

Proper fertility is hard work, results are hard to measure, and it’s not as exciting as “I applied product x and I grew 20 more bushels of corn!” Why do some genetics result in record yields in some fields and the same genetics in your field falls down? Soil quality and fertility might just have something to do with it.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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It hurts when.....

True story, I went to the doctor with a dime sized bald spot on the back of my head. The doctor told me to quite rubbing the spot. A month latter I had not rubbed/scratched the spot, it had grown to the size of a half dollar. I sought out a specialist, a dermatologist, he diagnosed it as alopecia, gave me some shots, problem solved.

Another true story from a consulting company:

 I wanted to share with you a story from a customer in the office yesterday. His father buys fertilizer from “Unspecified Fertilizer Dealer”. The customer however does the soil testing on his father's field and asked for a recommendation and we recommended 500 lbs. of Super 98G with the urea nitrogen for corn. This field has extremely high P & K levels and the base saturation of calcium is in the 49 to 53 percent range. The agronomist at the “Unspecified Fertilizer Dealer” told the customer he should only put on 200 lbs of Super 98G and add more phosphorous. The customer is not going to allow this to happen, as he understands the need for calcium in this field. I just wanted to share this story with you.

Pelletized lime products have been characterized as short-term, a quick fix, and even snake oil. If improper rates are reccommended and used most any product will have poor results. 

Many professionals that sell products may not fully understand how to use them or recommend them. This is not just a problem in agronomy but in all aspects of life. From the parts man that sends you home with the wrong part, to the doctor that tells you ""if it hurts stop doing it"".

Certainly if a product is not used as it is intended poor results will follow. Glyphosate is was a great product. Improper use over the years has reduced its effectiveness. Proper use of any agricultural product is the only way to make sure it performs as promised. Making sure you have a consultant qualified to make recommendations is a topic for another day.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Maintained by Craig Dick, blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing, we have a wide array of blog articles from Craig and some expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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