Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: January 2008
Calcium Product 98G

title-blogronomist

Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: January 2008

Cattle Love SuperCal SO4

Now is the time to start thinking about pasture fertilization. For many cattlemen the cost of fertilizers has them looking for alternatives to high priced N, P and S.

We have had a number of customers comment on the results they have witnessed with SuperCal SO4; higher stocking rate, reduced weeds, better cattle gains, and reduced vet bills. One skeptical customer applied SO4 to only one paddock of his rotational grazing pasture. When he moved the cattle off the SO4 applied section, the next day they busted down the fence to get back to that area. Cattle know where to find the best grass!

In grass legume mixtures SuperCal SO4 has many advantages of Ammonium Sulfate (AMS). First is cost, SO4 is almost half the cost of AMS, it doesn't cause acidity like AMS, and doesn't contain nitrogen. Established grass legume mixtures do not need extra nitrogen. If you fertilizer for the legume it will produce more than enough for the grass. If you fertilizer for the grass it will soon over-take and crowd out the legume.

Finally SO4 will increase water infiltration and holding capacity of your soil. By allowing more water to be held in the soil you can increase stocking rates since there will be more grass.

Fore go the high priced fertilizers and find out why SuperCal SO4 is the better choice for pastures and forages.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!   

Read more...
  • Published in Corn

Compaction

Lots of rain last fall, long periods of snow cover reducing soil freezing, the potential for excessive spring moisture due to melting snow, Elwynn Taylor istelling us we are in the 19th year. What do they have to do with each other, extra compaction compounded by the threat of drought.

Causes of Compaction:  

Raindrop impact - This is certainly a natural cause of compaction, and we see it as a soil crust (usually less than 1/2 inch thick at the soil surface) that may prevent seedling emergence. Having optimum amounts organic matter and calcium can alleviate crusting.

Tillage operations - Continuous moldboard plowing or disking at the same depth will cause serious tillage pans (compacted layers) just below the depth of tillage in some soils. Corn roots have a penetrating force of 350-400 lbs/sq in. Alfalfa roots can exert up 700 lbs/sq in. Many tillage compaction layers can exceed 750 lbs /sq in of force to penetrate.

Wheel traffic - This is without a doubt the major cause of soil compaction. With increasing farm size, the window of time in which to get these operations done in a timely manner is often limited. The weight of tractors has increased to 20 tons today, from less than 3 tons in the 1940's. This is of special concern because spring planting and fall harvest is often done before the soil is dry enough to support the heavy equipment.

Minimal Crop Rotation - The trend towards a limited crop rotation has had two effects: 1.) Limiting different rooting systems and their beneficial effects on breaking subsoil compaction, and 2.) Increased potential for compaction early in the cropping season, due to more tillage activity and field traffic.

A farmer in Minnesota that has been using SuperCal SO4 and deep tillage for a number of years has reported that his end rows are now higher yielding the middle section. I have recommended that he till half and not use SO4 on that half, use SO4 and not till on the other half. Since SuperCal SO4 “chemically” loosens the soil, and adds soluble calcium and sulfur, I expect higher return on the acres that receive SO4.

A little compaction is good, as it speeds the rate of seed germination because it promotes good contact between the seed and soil. Corn planters have been designed specifically to provide moderate compaction with planter mounted packer wheels that follow seed placement. Too little seed to soil contact can result in rootless corn syndrome.

Soil bulk density is a measure of the weight of the soil per unit volume. The greater the weight of a substance needed to fill up a certain amount of space the greater the density. The more air in a given space the lower the density. Think of a pound of feathers and a pound or rock. They weigh the same but the feathers will take up a lot more space (volume) than the rocks.

While soil bulk density is rarely measured it has a major impact on root growth.

Compacted soils have a very high bulk density reducing root growth. Soil compaction in the surface layer can increase runoff, increasing soil and water losses. SuperCal SO4 provides valuable calcium and sulfur increasing organic matter, and soil oxygen reducing bulk density. This increases water infiltration, and root proliferation, allowing your crop to access more water and nutrients

We can't control the weather, we can reduce the impact through proper soil quality!

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!   

Read more...

Treating manure with SuperCal SO4

This winter has been colder than many. The cost of natural gas and propane has been more expensive. The news has been full of stories of people not able to afford the rising cost of heating their homes. What about the folks that have large barns of animals? Not only are they feeling the heating crunch the cost of feed continues to increase. We have a solution to both problems.

Using SuperCal SO4 as a poultry litter treatment. SuperCal SO4 keeps the ammonia gas in manure from volatilizing. This means that there is less venting of buildings, keeping valuable warm air inside. Since ammonia’s molecular weight is less than normal atmosphere it takes less BTU’s to heat a building. Performance of birds will also be enhanced since they will not be breathing ammonia.

While reduction in building odor, decreased heating costs, and increased animal performance are great reasons for using a litter treatment, SuperCal SO4 will increase the value of the litter as a fertilizer. Since SuperCal SO4 keeps the nitrogen from volatilizing it is available to the plants in the field, resulting in higher yields and less high priced chemical fertilizer.

Application Rates for Poultry: 3-5 lbs per 100 birds per week for layers, 2-5# per 100 birds per week for broilers.

It is best to do applications every 10 days, but you can spread all of it when you put down new bedding. Example: 1000 birds for 8 weeks 3 pound rate, 1000/100=10x 8 weeks x 3 = 240 pounds.

Dairy: Up to 2-3# per head per week in dry stalls

Beef Feed Lots: 1-2# per head per week for animals ranging from 600-1000#

Swine: ½ to 2# per head per week for fattening barns and brood sows

These materials can be spread by hand, with a yard sized fertilizer spreader, an ATV spreader, or full size fertilizer buggy. For dry barns a seed pro-box on a stand works great as a holding/storage container. Just fill a five gallon bucket from the slide and spread a scoop full in each stall.

Does not contain sodium, or alum, both of which are toxic to plants!

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!   

Read more...

3 more reasons to use Gypsum

If you missed it Dan Davidson with DNT blogged about gypsum last week. Dan reports that a study from the USDA ARS that gypsum can indeed curb run off.Check out the research here.

While gypsum does not solve all problems and can’t work create miracles, many will find that it is useful in their fertility program.

Also a couple of weeks ago in the Iowa Farmer Today, there was an article by Catherine Kling, professor of Environmental Research Economics, the gist of the article was that there needs to be more government subsidizing of conservation practices to solve all the run off in Iowa. I wrote Ms. Kling suggesting that for lees than their budget we could treat every acre in Iowa with SuperCal SO4. There has been a wealth of research in addition to that by the ARS

The solute concentration from gypsum makes soil aggregates more stable.
Gypsum prevents crusting and aids water infiltration. (shainberg et al. 1989)
In a study by ARS gypsum has shown benefits in reducing P run-off.
L. Darrell Norton is at the USDA-ARS National Soil Erosion Research Laboratory, has also done research showing the benefits of gypsum in reducing N and P run-off.

In addition we are exploring a new product that can be handled and spread like dry fertilizer. One pound of active ingredient (AI) can effectively flocculate up to 10 tons of soil under ideal conditions. This can be done very cost effectively.

The Denver Water Board sponsored a study of sediment run-off, 10 pounds per acre of the AI showed a 95% reduction in sediment run-off.
Colorado State University sponsored a study with the AI, and showed a 80% reduction in sediment run-off.
In a study conducted by Wallace & Wallace dry-broadcasted AI reduced erosion by 75%-100%.

Using the combination of gypsum/AI can simultaneously improve crop yields 10-25% or more while reducing runoff, effectively making the cost of application free.
We could treat all the cropland acres in Iowa (27m) for approximately $20-$30/a, or $650 million, the cost being provided by the landowner, and recouped it in higher yields. As expected I have not recieved a response in almost a month.

Last week the Des Moines Register reported farm run off from Iowa is damaging the Gulf of Mexico. The question is now are you going to take action or wait for government mandates, taxes, and restrictions on fertilizer use.

You can work now to increase yields, increase organic matter and water infiltration and holding capacity, or continue to watch you soil erode, taking with it valuable nutrients and assuring more regulation.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!   

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed
Blogronomist

ABOUT OUR BLOGRONOMIST PAGE

Maintained by our team of experts, we have a wide array of blog articles from our experts and guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

  1. Categories
  2. Archives

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007