Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: November 2007
Calcium Product 98G

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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: November 2007

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We are constantly updating our website to bring you valuable information. Here is a short list of items you might find useful.

The State of Iowa Lime Report
Every quarter the Iowa Department of Agriculture samples lime quality of all liming products sold into the state of Iowa. Find out if the lime your using is any good or not.
 To get there, click on “Resources”, then “Links”, then “Lime Links”

Test Plot Results
We have been testing SuperCal SO4 and SuperCal 98G for over 10 years. See what others have found out, 98G raises pH, faster and more effectively than other products. Want to test our products on your farm? Contact you local agronomist or contact us here.
 To get there, click on “Resources”, then “Test Plot Results”

Customer Testimonials
Find out what other producers have discovered. SuperCal 98G and SO4 works on their farms. We have testimonials from farmers from North Dakota to Missouri. Have a great story how SuperCal 98G or SO4 increased production or decreased costs on your farm, let us know here.
 To get there, click on “Resources”, then “Customer Testimonials”

Event Calendar
Find out which farm shows and events we’ll be at. Click on the show name for all the details. We love talking with our customers and friends, and meeting new ones.
 To get there, click on “Resources”, then “Calendar”

We hope you find the information useful, thanks for reading.

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Thanks to everyone for a great year!

Last week at Calcium Products we held our Christmas party. I love our Christmas parties. It is a great time for me to spend time with everyone responsible for keeping the plants running. All the men and women worked extremely hard, around the clock to meet the demands. 

Larry, presented Kevin Wagner, the plant manager in Gilmore City with a plaque commemorating his 25 years of Service to Calcium Products. Kevin, Jay Jergens, (our Fort Dodge plant manager) and their teams work as hard as our customers do, maybe harder to keep the plants running smoothly, turning out product. I cannot thank them enough for all they do. 

I cannot forget the girls in the office. The three lovely ladies that take your orders, load the trucks, and send you your bills, Debbie, Lori, and Rose. They are always ready to take your calls, and I am always in a better mood after I talk with them. They make my job easy, and for some reason everyone would rather talk with them than me!

Lastly, thanks to all our great customers for helping us have a really great year. We are very excited about our plant expansions, and being able to supply SuperCal 98G and SO4 to everyone that orders it. It is not a lot of fun telling long time friends and new customers that we cannot help them.

Merry Christmas!

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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  • Published in Calcium

Calcium, more than just pH

It is true that NPK is used in greater percentages than calcium, but calcium is used more by weight and volume than any other nutrient. Calcium is rarely considered as a nutrient at all, only as a soil buffer to adjust pH.

Calcium should be considered the most important nutrient, and more than simply just a tool to move the pH scale. It plays a major role in the physiology of the plant, strengthening its physical structure, increasing nutrient uptake and protecting from disease. The importance of calcium in the soil, includes; the reduction of soil compaction, increased water infiltration, and helping to provide a better environment for the proliferation of beneficial bacteria. Some research even suggests that calcium plays a role in weed populations. To associate calcium only as a buffer of pH is agronomicly ignorant.

Calcium Benefits
Calcium neutralizes soil acidity
Improves soil structure and quality
Prevents soil crusting
Reduces soil salinity
Reduces erosion and phosphorous loss
Improves water penetration
Promotes root development
Calcium stimulates growth of ""soil life"", including nitrogen-fixing bacteria.
Every plant needs calcium to grow
Calcium helps create a healthy environment for your plants
Only nitrogen and potassium are required in larger amounts by plants
Once fixed, calcium is not mobile in the plant
It is an important constituent of cell walls and can only be supplied in the xylem sap
If the plant runs out of a supply of calcium, it cannot remobilize calcium from older tissues
If transpiration is reduced, the calcium supply to growing tissues will become inadequate
Calcium is found in many minerals in soil, but is relatively insoluble.
A common misconception is that if the pH is high, adequate calcium is present
High levels of other cations such as magnesium, iron, sodium, and potassium can increase pH
Plant available calcium determines the uptake of all other nutrients into the plant
It is the carrier of all other nutrients to the plant
As calcium content in the plant drops so can the protein, mineral and energy levels of the plant
Calcium is not considered a mobile nutrient, but can leach with excess nitrogen
Over fertilization of nitrogen and potassium will reduce calcium availability
High potassium levels reduces the uptake of calcium
You will usually find an increase in all mineral levels in a plant following the correction of low calcium
Calcium plays a critical metabolic role in carbohydrate removal.
Calcium neutralizes cell acids
Study after study shows calcium at the optimum level will decrease disease in most plants
Yield, quality, taste, shelf life and disease resistance are all functions of good calcium uptake

SuperCal SO4 and SuperCal 98G are great sources of calcium. Our pelletized processing makes it easy to add calcium to your dry fertilizer program. See your local dealer or give us a call to see how easy it can be to reduce input costs, and increase yields.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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  • Published in Corn

5 Things to achieve high yields

We learned at the university that it takes nitrogen, starter, planting the proper hybrid, planting earlier, and increasing population to grow corn. However, most growers don't grow 300 bushel corn, but are doing the above 5 things. So what are the farmers that grow high yield corn doing, they are focusing on their soil.

Soil sample
Not just for P and pH, do a full analysis. While having enough P and the proper pH are some major limiting factors, they are not all of them. Do a full analysis at least every other year. If you're having a field grid sampled, have them pull a couple of extra samples to run a full analysis on.

Budget for soil maintenance
Top producing farmers know that their soil will always perform if they add back what they take every year. Plan on a yearly maintenance program, budgeting money for lime and/or gypsum, P, secondary, and micronutrients. Once you're in a nutrient deficient situation, it takes time and is expensive to correct.

Scout the whole field
Scout the soil, stop scouting only half your crop; know what is happening in the root zone. Most farmers are only concerned with what is happening with their crop above ground. They neglect more than half the plant. Dig next to the row, how are the roots growing, is there a visible hard pan, is moisture making it down into the soil profile, do you have large numbers of earthworms. If you cannot get a shovel in the ground by standing on it, you have compaction and your roots will not be able grow properly.

Proper residue management
Residue management starts with the header attachment on the combine. With corn make sure the header is processing the stalks, and the combine is only processing the ear and husks. Not only will this increase combine efficiency, it will distribute the residue more evenly, resulting in faster decomposition of stalks. Complete and proper decomposition increases organic matter and returns valuable nutrients to the soil.

Figure out what else is missing
For many farmers it is not a lack of N, P, K or pH that is keeping their yields low it is something else. Ignore lack of rainfall, and other things that are out of your control. Think about the things you can change; tillage, micronutrient levels, and organic matter. If your having problems achieving high yields, it is likely due to one or more problems associated with your soil.

Calcium Products, lower input costs, higher yields, better soil

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Is the price to high, or does it cost too much?

Everyone wants to know how much does that cost? What is the price of that?

Are you concerned with the value on the bill (price), or are concerned with what that purchase can do for your bottom line, how it affects other areas of your business (cost). Price and cost are two separate terms, with two separate meanings.

Example: Comparing a JD 9660 combine versus a JD 4400

Price of JD 9660 - $150,000 no heads

Price of JD 4400 - $6500 w/heads

If you only ask the price, the 4400 sounds like a bargain. It’s 1/5 the cost of a 9660, has the heads as part of the deal. If they both can harvest grain what else besides the price is there to compare?

The problem is if you don’t figure the cost of each combine it is not an accurate comparison.

 9660 Cost

4400 Cost

 Repairs, its new so none

 Lots of repairs, its old

 Capacity, 15-20 acres per hour

 Capacity, 2.5-5 acres per hour

 Comfort, auto controls, grain loss monitoring

  Loud, hot, dusty, and loud

 Get harvest done quickly, get on with life  Harvest all winter, lose part of crop due to snow
 Opportunity cost of money  Pay for combine with sofa change
 Cost of fuel, 1-2 gal per acre  Cost of fue,l 3-5 gal per acre

There are many other cost that could be considered as well, for the guy farming 150 acres a 4400 is likely the right machine. If you farm a 1000 acres or more a bigger machine makes more sense. If you are not doing this kind of analysis with each purchase on your farm, you may be missing a better opportunity, losing money on a poor purchase, and not operating as efficiently as possible.

This kind of analysis applies to your fertilizer inputs as well. What is the value on the bill for lime (price). Should you buy a lime product that is $110 per ton, or one that is $22 per ton. Did you stop to figure the cost?

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

Read more...
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Maintained by our team of experts, we have a wide array of blog articles from our experts and guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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