Calcium Products - Blogronomist
Calcium Product 98G

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Can 98G and SO4 be Applied on Frozen Ground?

We are often asked about applying our products on snow-covered or frozen ground. While it may seem intuitive that products should not be applied to frozen ground, in general, applications can be made during late fall or winter and have similar considerations as other times of the year, such as water and ground conditions. When determining if conditions are adequate to apply SO4 and 98G, keep these considerations in mind. Potential for water runoff Water influences movement of surface applied inputs. When water has potential to runoff and not infiltrate, then perhaps applications should be delayed. Late fall and early winter before the ground is completely frozen can be a good time to make applications. As long as there’s not a substantial amount of snow on the ground (less than 6 inches), applications of 98G and SO4 can still be made. If snow comes early, there’s potential that it will…
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Take the 98G Challenge – See How Your Aglime Stacks Up.

Do you know how effective your aglime is in changing soil pH? Below are two photos comparing 98G, our pelletized lime product, to aglime being spread in a field near Boxholm, Iowa. The photos illustrate that the finest particles in aglime, although the most effective at changing soil pH, are subject to significant drift loss. 98G is pelletized for uniform distribution out of application equipment resulting in ideal spread and solubility. It also has the ability to be mixed with other dry fertilizers. Learn more about the 98G Challenge and request an aglime sample collection kit.   98G, October 18th, 5-10 mph winds.   Aglime, October 19th, 10-15 mph winds.
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Applying Nitrogen to Enhance Corn Residue Decomposition: Does it Work?

  Applying nitrogen in the fall to enhance corn residue decomposition occurs with some frequency in the Midwestern United States. The purpose of this application (normally applied as AMS or UAN) is to deliver a nitrogen source to feed microbes and increase the speed at which corn residue is decomposed. The main reason this topic seems more prevalent in recent years may be related to current hybrids and farming practices. Modern genetics have selected for stronger stalks and larger plants, while increases in corn-on-corn rotations and reduced tillage have resulted in more residual biomass. Combined, these result in greater demand on microbes to minimize the impact of residue on the following season's operations. Rationale Behind "Stalk Burndown" The rationale behind applying N to aid in stalk decomposition is related to the carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratio, which indicates how effectively microbes decompose different materials. The C:N ratio is important because it denotes how…
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Soil pH – The Foundation for Nutrient Availability

Every nutrient's availability is affected by soil pH. Soil pH is the foundation and main governing parameter of soil fertility. Every nutrient’s availability to plants is affected by soil pH – some more so than others – which is why correcting and maintaining soil pH at adequate levels is so important. Phosphorous (P) availability is the most affected nutrient by pH because the chemistry of P is such that it loves to react with other minerals in the soil at varying pH levels. At high pH, P is very attracted to calcium, while at low pH, P is very attracted to aluminum and iron. When P reacts with calcium, aluminum, or iron, it forms insoluble compounds that plants cannot easily access. Nitrogen (N) and Potassium (K) are also affected by pH, but not in the same way as P. At low pH, aluminum and iron increase in availability and “out-compete”…
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Three Tips to Spot Sulfur Deficiency in Corn

Now is the time to start scouting for sulfur deficiency in corn plants. As you’re out and about this spring, keep these three tips in mind to successfully identify sulfur deficiency. Check young corn plants. Sulfur deficiency is most obvious early in the growing season, when the plant is most vulnerable to nutrient shortages. Look at leaf color. From afar, plants with a pale green appearance should be inspected closer for nutrient deficiency symptoms. Both sulfur and nitrogen deficiency are marked by yellow striping between the veins of the leaf (interveinal chlorosis), which can cause confusion when diagnosing sulfur vs. nitrogen deficiency. The image above shows sulfur deficiency. Inspect plants’ youngest leaves. Sulfur deficiency shows up in the youngest leaves of the corn plant first, while nitrogen deficiency appears in the older leaves first. The difference is related to how each nutrient is mobilized in the plant. The good news…
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Maintained by Craig Dick, blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing, we have a wide array of blog articles from Craig and some expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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